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Downtown Specific Plan, Volumes 1 & 4� SPECIFIC PLANVOLUMES I & 4.. EXISTING CONDITIONSREPORT & FINAL JIMR I Final Plan, November 199 7 Prepared by the Town of Truckee Community Development Department - Planning Division 11570 Donner Vass Road Truckee, Ca. 96161 1 (916) 582-7876 t 11 The final FIR for the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan consists of the following documents: 1. The Draft FIR for the Downtown Specific Plan, dated May 1997 2. The comments on the Draft FIR and the response to comments on the Draft FIR 3. The corrections and modifications to the Draft FIR 4. The Mitigation Monitoring Program Items 2-4 are contained in Attachment B to Volume 4, The Final FIR for the Downtown Specific Plan was certified by the Truckee Town Council by Resolution 97-37. aow�n of CUE Prepared by the Town of Truckee Community Development Department - Planning Division 11570 Donner Vass Road Truckee, Ca. 96161 1 (916) 582-7876 t 11 The final FIR for the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan consists of the following documents: 1. The Draft FIR for the Downtown Specific Plan, dated May 1997 2. The comments on the Draft FIR and the response to comments on the Draft FIR 3. The corrections and modifications to the Draft FIR 4. The Mitigation Monitoring Program Items 2-4 are contained in Attachment B to Volume 4, The Final FIR for the Downtown Specific Plan was certified by the Truckee Town Council by Resolution 97-37. DON��ONVN TRUCKE SPECIFIC PLAN I 1 VOLUME 4: DRAFT EIR 1 SC]H[ #95Il12009 � May Il997 it YOWK OF —444 !C�� Prepared by the Town. of Truckee Community Development Department - Planning Division 11570 Danner Pass Road Truckee, Ca. 96161 (916) 582-7876 Downtown jackee S eecilicPlasm _ Tony Lashhrook - Community Development Director Elizabeth Eddins - Town Planner Lenore Erber - Landscape architect Duane Hall - Associate Planner Gavin Ball - Assistant Planner Brad Wall - Assistant Planner Kelly Holm - Administrative Secretary Anton Nelessen & Associates - Vision Planning Process Leigh Scott & Cleary - Consulting Traffic Engineers Laura J. Mello Landscape Architecture - Consulting Landscape Architect Stanley R. Hnlfcnan & Associates - Consulthig Economists ■ Downtown Specific -Plan Draft EIR Table of Contents IChapter Title Page Chapter 1: Introduction...................................................1 A. Purpose of the Document ....................................... 1-1 B. Consistency with the Town of Truckee General Plan ................. 1-1 C. Project Location ............................................... ]-2 D. Project Description 1-3 E. Local Environmental Setting....................................1-3 F. Regional Environmental Setting .. 1-3 G. Historic and Cultural Setting ........ ........................1-3 H. Report Organization ........................................... 1-6 I. Use of Incorporation by ......` ................................. 1-6 J. Intended Uses of the Document 1-7 K. Summary of Specific Plan Policies ................................ 1-7 L. Mitigation Monitoring Program .................................. 1-7 Chapter2: Executive Summary ............................................ 2 ' A. Introduction ................................................ 2-1 B. Project Description ........................................... 2-1 C. Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures... 2-1 D. Alternatives . ... ` • ... ` ........ 2-1 E. Areas of Controversy ......................................... 2-2 F. Issues to be Resolved ........................................ 2-2 G. Summary Table ............................................. 2-2 Chapter 3: Population + and Housing ............................... . .......... 3 A. Setting 3-1 B. Evaluation Guidelines .................................. . . . . . 3-4 C: Impacts .................................................... 3-4 D. Mitigation Measures ......................................... 3-4 t Chapter 4: Transportation and Circulation..................................4 A. Setting ..................................................... 4-1 B. Evaluation Guidelines ........................................ 4-1 C. Circulation Impacts .......................................... 4-2 D. Parking Impacts ............................................ 4-3 D. Mitigation Measures ......................................... 4-4 Chapter 5: Land Use ..................................................... 5 A. Setting ..................................................... 5-1 B. Evaluation Guidelines . 5-5 C. Impacts .................................................... 5-5 t Downtown Specific Pian Draft EIR Table of Contents 1 Chapter Title Page D. Mitigation Measures ......................................... 5-6 Chapter 6: Soils, Geology, & Ground Contamination ......................... 6 A. Setting ..................................................... 6-1 B. Evaluation Guidelines ........................................ 6-1 C. Impacts ........................................... I........ 6-2 D. Mitigation Measures ........................................ 6-3 Chapter 7: Air Quality ................................................... 7 A. Setting ..................................................... 7-1 B. Evaluation Guidelines ........................................ 7-2 C. Impacts...................................4........ ...... 7-3 D. Mitigation Measures ......................................... 7-4 Chapter8: Noise........................................................8 A. Setting- .................................................... 8-1 B. Evaluation Guidelines ........................................ 8-1 C. Impacts .................................................... 8-2 D. Mitigation Measures ......................................... 8-3 Chapter 9: Biological and Scenic Resources .................................. 9 A. Setting .................................................... 9-1 B. Evaluation Guidelines ....................................... 9-1 t C. Impacts ................................................... 9-1 D. Mitigation Measures ........................................ 94 Chapter 10: Cultural and Historic Resources ............................... 10 A. Setting ................................................... 101 B. Evaluation Guidelines ...................................... 10-5 C. Impacts .................................................. 10-6 D. Mitigation Measures ...................................... 10-6 Chapter 11: Public Services and Infrastructure ............................. 11 A. Setting .................................................. 11-1 B. Evaluation Guidelines ..................................... I1-6 C. Impacts ................................................. 11-6 D. Mitigation Measures ...................................... 11-9 t IDowntown Specific Plan Draft EIR Table of Contents Chapter Title Page A. Cumulative Impacts...........13-1 B. Unavoidable Significant Impacts .......................... 13-1 C. Growth Inducing Impacts ................................. 13-1 ID. Project Alternatives ...................................... 13-1 APPENDIX A - TRUCKEE DOWNTOWN CIRCULATION STUDY APPENDIX B - MAPF PC -2 INITIATIVE TRAFFIC ANALYSIS - APPENDIX C RESPONSES TO NOTICE OF PREPARATION it 1 t 1 Chapter 12: Natural Hazards 1 Safety Hazards ............................. 12 A. Setting .................................................. 12-1 B. Evaluation Guidelines ..................................... 12-1 C. Impacts ................................................. 12-2 D. Mitigation Measures ...................................... 12-3 Chapter 13: p o` Project Alternatives & CEQA Assessments ..................... 13 A. Cumulative Impacts...........13-1 B. Unavoidable Significant Impacts .......................... 13-1 C. Growth Inducing Impacts ................................. 13-1 ID. Project Alternatives ...................................... 13-1 APPENDIX A - TRUCKEE DOWNTOWN CIRCULATION STUDY APPENDIX B - MAPF PC -2 INITIATIVE TRAFFIC ANALYSIS - APPENDIX C RESPONSES TO NOTICE OF PREPARATION it 1 t 1 I J IChapter I - INTRODU+CTION A. Purpose of the Document This draft environmental impact report (DEIR) has been prepared for the Town of Truckee Downtown Specific Plan. The policy and regulatory components of the Specific Plan consist of Volume 2, Policies and Programs, and Volume 3, DSA Zoning Ordinance. This EIR provides analysis of the range of potential environmental impacts of the Specific Plan, as well as the proposed alternatives to the plan. This document is a program level EIR, in that it evaluates broad plan policies, their requirements, their interrelationships, and their associated environmental impacts. Furthermore, the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) provides that future site specific developments within the Downtown Study Area (DSA) can provide their environmental analysis as "tiered" off of this EIR. This means that any future project in the DSA that requires environmental review need only provide detailed analysis of those impacts that would occur above and beyond those dealt with in this document. The advantages of a program EIR are that it: (1) Provides for a more exhaustive consideration of effects and alternatives than would be practical in an EIR. on an individual action, (2) Ensures consideration of cumulative impacts that might be slighted in a case-by-case analysis, (3) Avoids duplicative reconsideration of basic policy concerns, (4) Allows the Town to consider broad policy alternatives and program -wide mitigation measures at an early time when the Town has greater flexibility to deal with basic problems or cumulative impacts, and, (5) Allows for a reduction in paperwork. B. C�Qnsistency with thf,Town of Truckee General Plan According to Article 8 of the State of California Planning and Zoning Law, specific plans may not be adopted or amended unless the proposed specific plan or amendment is consistent with the general plan or comprehensive plan. Legally, the Downtown Specific Plan is a tool for implementing the Town of Truckee General Plan, containing the goals, objectives, and policies needed to tailor the General Plan to fit this particular area. The specific plan EIR can be considered a "second -level" tier in the Town's land use planning environmental analysis. The "first -level" tier is the EIR certified for the Town General Plan. The General Pian EIR analyzed potential environmental impacts which may result from development subsequently allowed by the General Plan including development in the Downtown Study Area. The General Plan establishes the policy basis for Town decision-making, particularly for land use and development issues, for the preparation of the Town's initial zoning and development standards, capital facility plans, and the Downtown Specific Plan. The scope of analysis for the General Plan EIR is broad in nature, and is intended to identify the need for general plan policy direction in areas of potential environmental impact. Downtown Truckee Speck flan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 1-1 This specific pian implements the Town General Plan by providing for more detailed planning and analysis in the Downtown Study Area, and the EIR can be considered a lower -tier of the General Plan EIR. The specific plan EIR expands on the General Plan EIR by analyzing in greater depth potential environmental impacts which may result from development in the downtown study area and identifying further need for policy direction in areas of potential environmental impact. In its role as a lower -level tier ESR, the specific plan EIR generally will not address cumulative and off-site impacts which were sufficiently addressed by the General Plan EIR. Mitigation measures adopted by the General Plan, or impacts of similar or greater effect, are included as part of this EIR to address the cumulative environmental impacts identified in the General Plan ETR. The specific plan EIR will also be used as a higher -tier EIR when environmental impact reports and negative declarations are prepared for development projects and plans submitted pursuant to the specific plan and also for public improvement projects identified in the plan. Examples of "third -level" tier projects include a Redevelopment Plan and individual development applications. CEQA exempts certain projects from further environmental review if the project is consistent with the specific plan and the impacts have been analyzed and mitigated in the specific plan EIR, or, on projects which require environmental review, CEQA limits environmental review to project -specific impacts. It is the intent of this EIR to address cumulative environmental impacts related to projected 20 - year development projections in the DSA. Future development projects which are consistent with the Specific Plan will tier off the analysis contained in this EIR for cumulative impacts. As a "program level" EIR, if the document completely addresses the issues associated with the "future project," then no additional environmental review of that project will be necessary. If further review is required, then only the documentation of that review which is over and above that of the program DEIR needs to be addressed in the subsequent project EIR. This is a process known as "tiering" (CEQA Guidelines section 15385), which is meant to substantially reduce or eliminate redundancy in environmental analyses. Due to the broad scope of the Downtown Specific Plan, and the potential for significant site specific impacts related to new development projects, new "discretionary" development projects will be subject to further environmental review at the application stage. If the initial study for such projects reveals that there may be potentially significant environmental impacts, above and beyond those addressed in the program EIR, then a subsequent mitigated negative declaration or EIR for the project will be required. Project Location The Town of Truckee is located in eastern Nevada County (California), on Interstate 80, about thirty-five mites west of Reno, Nevada. The DSA is contained completely within the Truckee ' Town limits, and covers an area of approximately one square mile. Interstate 80 marks the northern boundary; the southern boundary line includes the hilltop area and land that parallels the Truckee River to the (Placer f Nevada) county line. This county line frames a portion of the DSA Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Drafi Environmental Impact Report 1-2 n limits at the extreme western end, while the "old mill site" essentially forms the eastern boundary. Figure 1- I shows a vicinity map of the project area, and Figure 1-2 shows the boundaries of the DSA. D. Proiect Description The Town of Truckee Downtown Study Area Specific Plan implements the Town's General Plan, as it pertains to the DSA. It is a comprehensive land use and development plan that is meant to guide the growth and development of the DSA for the next twenty years. The Downtown Specific Plan consists of 4 Volumes: Volume i is the Existing Conditions P g Report, much of which has been incorporated into this EIR for the purpose of describing existing environmental conditions. Volume 2 of the Specific Plan consists of the policies and programs, and Volume 3 consists of the zoning ordinance. The project analyzed in this DEIR consists of Volumes 2 and 3 of the Specific Plan: the policies, programs and the zoning ordinance. These Volumes of the Specific Plan are hereby incorporated by reference for purposes of the DEIR project description. The executive summary of Volume 2 of the Specific Plan is contained in the DEIR and appendix A. Volume 4 of the Specific Plan is the DEIR, and will ultimately also include the FEIR. The Specific Plan accommodates a substantial amount of additional "infill" growth, which is described in Table 2.1 of Volume 2. Table 2.1 identifies existing and projected growth accommodated by the Specific Plan by DSA subareas, which are shown on Figure 2.1 of Volume 2. E. Local Environrmraental Settiniz Downtown Truckee is contained within a high mountain valley which was formed long ago as periods of glacial activity coincided with uplift of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. The Truckee River flows through the DSA from west to east, as it makes its way from the north shore of Lake Tahoe to Pyramid Lake in the state of Nevada. Therefore, both riparian and high mountain forest ecosystems can be found within the study area. 1 F. Regional Environmental Settin The Town itself is generally accepted to be the regional center for transportation, business, commerce, and tourism. Truckee is the major urban area in the Sierra Nevada mountains, north of Lake Tahoe. This holds true even though the Town's population is just over 10,000. Truckee is located in the "Mixed Conifer - Jeffery Pine - Sagebrush life zone," as described by the Nevada County Master Environmental Inventory ( 1991). G. Historic and Cultural -Setting The DSA contains lands that are rich in history, as one of the wagon train routes for California's first Caucasian settlers from the eastern states once passed through the area. Interstate 80 continues to be the main gateway to California for westbound travelers. The world's first long distance telephone line came through Truckee; the first trans -continental railroad, which runs Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental bnipact Report 1-3 r fi �'T�T T T11. • • r rH .I NOT TO SCALE L1 C1 t it r VICENUTY MAP � FEGURE M Dowutown Truckee Specific Plan Infroduc#ion - Page 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Im �J through the heart of the DSA, was successfully completed in the late 1800's. and is still in use to this day. There are many structures, some which have been restored, from this era that still stand in Truckee. Chapter 10 of this EIR describes the historic setting of the study area. H B eport OrgaUization This draft EIR follows the standard organizational format recommended by the CEQA guidelines for environmental assessments. This document is intended to provide full disclosure of the potential environmental effects associated with the DSA Specific Plan. For all possible adverse impacts that the proposed plan could have on the environment, mitigation measures are given that would reduce (although not always to a less -than -significant level) or eliminate them. These mitigation measures are in the form of policies and standards contained in Volumes 2 and 3 of the Specific Plan. The majority of this document is devoted to impact analysis_ Each chapter is divided into four sections: Setting, Evaluation Guidelines, Impacts, and Mitigation. The "Setting" sections briefly describe the existing environmental conditions, incorporating appropriate sections of the Existing Conditions Report by reference_ "Evaluation Guidelines" describe the criteria that determine any particular impact's potential significance. "Impact" sections summarize relevant plan proposals and analyze any associated potential environmental impacts. "Mitigation" sections describe the policies and standards which have been included in the Specific Plan to reduce or eliminate any of these potentially adverse impacts. A description and analysis of project alternatives is discussed in chapter 13, summary information regarding environmental impacts and mitigation measures is contained in chapter 2, (the Executive Summary), while various mandatory CEQA analyses (such as cumulative impacts, unavoidable significant impacts, irreversible significant impacts, and growth inducing impacts) that are above and beyond the analysis of individual potential impacts are grouped together in chapter 14. IUse ofInconoration by Reference CEQA guidelines permit the use of relevant data generated while preparing related environmental documents by a procedure termed "incorporation by reference." Environmental impact reports may incorporate any portion of relevant documents that are both a matter of public record and generally available to the public. According to section 15150 of the CEQA Guidelines, incorporation by reference may be used when including long, descriptive, or technical materials that provide general background, but do not directly contribute to the analysis at hand. Examples of material that may be incorporated by reference include. a description of a proposed project's environmental setting from another EIR or a description of the city or county general plan applicable to the project's location. All documents whose contents are incorporated by reference must be made available for public inspection at the lead agency's office (in this case, the Town of Truckee Community Development Department). Within this document, incorporation by reference has been used extensively. Appropriate Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 1-6 summaries are provided of the information included in this manner. Documents which are incorporated by referenced include the Town of Truckee General Plan, and Volumes I, II, and III of the DSA Specific Plan. Copies of these documents are on file, and available for public review, at the Truckee Town Hall. J. Intended Uses of the QQcument The primary use of this DEIR is to analyze potentially significant impacts of Downtown Specific Plan implementation, and to identify mitigation measures for these potentially significant impacts. This document is also intended to assist the Planning Commission, Town Council, and the general public in their deliberation on the policies, ,guidelines, and implementation strategies included in the Specific Plan. The EIR is the specificg lan's disclosure document regarding the potential environmental p g impacts which may result from the implementation of the plan. As encouraged by CEQA, the environmental analysis of the plan was conducted in conjunction with the preparation of the plan so that environmental issues could be addressed as early as possible and integrated with other planning objectives. Unlike many EIRs which analyze projects for environmental impacts and identify mitigation measures which must be subsequently incorporated into the project, this EIR analyzes the environmental impacts of the specific plan and describes how they have been mitigated by specific plan policies and zoning standards. The specific plan already incorporates most of the environmental policies and mitigation measures identified in the EIR. This Draft EIR is a public review document which affords the public and interested agencies the ability to review and provide comments on the adequacy of the EIR. The Draft EIR will be F circulated for a 45 day review period to allow written comments on the DEIR to be submitted by the public. The Final EIR will consist of all responses to the written comments on the DEIR, and any corrections necessary. The Town Council will be review the Draft EIR and Final EIR as part of the public review process for adoption of the Downtown Specific Plan. The Town Council is required to certify the Final EIR as complying with CEQA prior to adoption of the Downtown Specific Plan, K. Summ= 12f S ecific Plan 'cies The policies contained in Volume 2 of the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan are summarized in Table 1.1. These are the policies which are referred to throughout this EIR as mitigation measures. For the full text of the policies refer to the Specific Plan, Volume 2. The format of the policies is Chapter, Section #, Policy #. For example, Policy 7 +G.3 refers to Chapter Seven, Section G, policy 3. L. Mi t' ram The policies in this EIR which function as mitigation measures are implemented through the Downtown Specific Plan. 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LOLW A oC] oo c 6 cc7 a7 or, 00 06 Ql w o i G C4 L} D Le' LL, t7 +� E E r: C U U 'n U N •U+ y U W U CO U ..i . p m ,� � O ❑_ � O C 4 ❑ O C A a. � v�o roto m -M u no nri T on m C r i� W U � 5 666 �a,IB nn�C nnr3 ^^IC 41"0 W d Lr N d L -Jx� �7 y r" Q1 U Ur" U U U O ❑ v 0 q G y q CL ❑ m 'a y G y 0 nG .::.F+�{. .. y ❑ C I+f U ❑ +� v m > '�-..... on 'cy G q '. G w ❑. It a l U.} w o i G C4 L} D Le' LL, t7 L 4 _71 r .. ....... ....... c u .. ..... ..... ......... .. Its o L 4 n r E c u Its o aj be .. ... . ...... . 41 UD oi- ,A, :7t 'u. L Id rd 4 n r E c u Its aj 41 Id rd cl 7: E aj 41 4u .. ............ ... . I . . . . ....... .. . .. . .......... Fu CL ,d r 7: E 41 .. ............ ... . I . . . . ....... .. . .. . .......... _71 CL Qj CL Cd W 43 rL . . ....... . Ow . ........... ........... .... ...... dy 1 iChapter 2 - EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A. Introduction This chapter is a summary of the discussion of potential environmental impacts, mitigation measures, and alternatives of the Town of Truckee Specific Plan. It also addresses areas of I 11 e possible controversy and issues which need to be resolved in the Environmental Impact Report (EIR). The summary was prepared in accordance to the requirements of section 15123 of the California Environmental Quality Act Guidelines. This section is intended to serve only as a summary, and readers should refer to the main body of text for further discussion on the items outlined herein. The individual sections of the EIR for each item are referenced in the summary table at the end of this chapter. B. Project Description The proposed project is a Specific Plan that will implement the Town of Truckee General Plan, as it pertains to the (re)development of the Downtown Study Area (DSA). The Specific Plan will guide and regulate future land uses, site and building design, and public improvements within the plan area. C. Environmental Impacts and Mitigation Measures A summary of potential environmental impacts, mitigation measures, and determinations of significance are contained in the summary table at the end of this chapter. D. Alternatives There are three alternatives that were considered in this EIR (see chapter 15). Each of these is briefly described below. Alternative 41 -. Proposed Plan - This alternative was developed to meet the reasonable needs of the community for residential, commercial, and industrial development while providing environmental protection to the DSA. This plan implements General Plan policies directing infill development into the Truckee Downtown Area. This alternative balances the need for growth with the need to protect the environment, and is the recommended Specific Plan. The potential environmental impacts of this alternative are addressed in this document, and are summarized in the table at the end of this chapter. Alternative #2: No Project - This alternative would maintain the existing zoning within the DSA, neither encouraging nor discouraging additional development. Implementation of this alternative would result in inconsistencies between the existing zoning and the Town of Truckee General Plan, particularly as it relates to relocating industrial uses off the Truckee River, acconunodating additional infill commercial and residential growth in the DSA, and addressing longstanding problems with parking and pedestrian access. The Specific Plan policies intended to mitigate potentially significant impacts associated with new growth would not be implemented, resulting in greater environmental impacts under this alternative. In addition, significant and unmitigated impacts related to air quality and traffic circulation would remain. Downtown Truckee Specific Placa - Draft Environmental Impact Report 2-1 Alternative #3; Reduced development I Low Growth - This alternative would reduce the intensity , and density of growth in the DSA relative to the preferred alternative. Potential adverse environmental impacts would be reduced accordingly, but would still require mitigation in most cases. Impacts to air quality and traffic f circulation would remain as significant and unavoidable. E. Areas of Corgi►rov;,rsy I The Downtown Specific Plan preparation process was done in close coordination with the business and environmental community. The extensive community involvement resulted in consensus building on the policy direction and land uses in the Specific Plan. The areas of controversy are primarily focussed on development in the Highway 267 C Cemetery subarea and relate to the appropriate type of development at this location and its orientation to the 1-80 Freeway. F. Issues to be Resolved There are no major outstanding issues to be resolved related to this DEIR. G. Summm Table ' The following table provides a summary of the impacts and mitigation measures identified in this EIR. Please refer to Table 1.1 in this E1R, of to Volume 2 of the Downtown Specific Plan, for an explanation of the policies listed. Impact Category Impacts Mitigation Measures Finding Population and Housing Specific Plan will result in an None Not significant, implements General (Ch. 3) increase in population and housing in Plan policies. the DSA. Transportation and Circulation Impacts - Traffic from Policies 3.13.1-7 Mitigated to a less than significant Circulation (Ch. 4) infill ,growth will reduce LOS to Projects 3.C.1-5 level with implementation of below "E" at main DSA intersections. identified project s and the Hwy 257 Bypass. Significant and unmitigabde in the interim period prior to construction of the 267 Bypass. Parking Impacts - Parking demand Policies 3.E.1-13 Mitigated to a less than significant created by infill growth will exceed 3.F. Listed streetscape impact with implementation of listed currently available parking supply. improvements polices & projects. 3.G. Projects 1-7 3.H. Projects 1-5 Land Use (Ch. 5) Potential for land use incompatibility Polices 2.13.3 & 16 Mitigated to a less than significant between different land uses. Polices 2.E.2 & 5 impact with implementation of listed polices & projects. Soils and Geology (Ch. 6) New development will create the Policies 7.0 1&2 Mitigated to a less than significant potential for increased soil erosion Policy 7.F.1 `impact with implementation of listed and land instability. polices & projects. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 2-2 1 1 N Impact Category Impacts Mitigation Measures Finding it Quality (Ch. 7) New development could exacerbate Town of Truckee Air Significant and Unmitigable existing PM 10 pollutant levels {duality Management Plan Noise (Ch. 8) Potential for exposure of sensitive Policies 7.x3.1-4 Mitigated to a less than significant receptors to noise levels in excess of impact with impiementation of listed adopted standards. policies. iological and Scenic New development could create Policies 2.8.3, Mitigated to a less than significant esources potential adverse impacts to sensitive 2G 1,7,9,10; impact with implementation of listed Ch. 9) habitat, including Riparian zones. 7B 1-7, 7C 1&2 , 7F 1&2, policies. 9C4. New devclopment could result in Mitigated to a less than significant potential adverse impacts to scenic impact with implementation of listed resources. policies. New development could result in Mitigated to a less than significant adverse impacts to water quality. impact with implementation of listed policies. ultural and Historic New grading for development could Chapter 8 - All policies in Mitigated to a less than significant esources (Ch. 10) result in disturbance of previously all sections. impact with implementation of listed undiscovered archaeological policies. resources. Historic resources could be destroyed Mitigated to a less than significant :x to make way for new development. impact with implementation of listed policies. Public Services and Increased demand for public services All policies in Sections Mitigated to a less than significant nfrastructure (Ch. 11) Roc drainage facilities as a result of new 6B, 6D, 6E, 6F, 60 impact with implementation of fisted growth. policies. Increased demand for recreational Parks proposals in Chapter areas as a result of new growth. 9. Natural Hazards 1 Safety New development may be subject to All policies in Sections 6E, Mitigated to a less than significant azards (Ch. 12) flood, landslide, earthquake, and fire policies 6G 1-4; impact with implementation of listed hazards policy 7F 2. policies. H. &mmary of Responses tQ the Noticg of Ercparation. The Notice of Preparation of the Downtown Specific Plan EIR was circulated in November 1995. The NOP was sent to the State Clearinghouse and all affected local agencies - Following is a summary of the comments received, and the sections of the EIR where these comments are addressed. The NOP responses are reproduced in Appendix C. 1) Department of Environmenal Health: Issues regarding site specific cleanup of hazardous waste and/or groundwater contaminated sites need to be addressed. Soil and groundwater contamination is addressed in Chapter 6 Downlown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 2-3 2) Tahoe Truckee Airport District: Please address existing and increased air traffic as it relates to noise impacts. Noise impact analsyis is tiered off the General Plan EIR noise impact analysis, which included evaluation of existing and future airport noise contours. Refer to Chapter 8 of the EIR for more information. 3) Placer County Department of Public Works: a) The traffic created by proposed the development could significantly impact the intersection of SR 89 and West River Street, which is within Placer County. The EIR should address this issue. b) Any impacts to SR 267 and the improvements required to mitigate these impacts should be addressed. c) The Specific Plan should identify a mechanism for funding any improvements identified as mitigations for impacts. Impacts to West River Street & Hwy 89 and Hwy 267 are evaluated in the Downtown Truckee Traffic Study which is included as appendix to this EIR. Please refer to Chapter 4 for a discussion of the impacts and mitigation measures identified in the traffic study. 4) Southwest Gas: Southwest's expansion plans included a "Proponent's Environmental , Assessment" which resulted in a negative declaration being granted in February 1995. 5) U.S. Department of the Interior: The proposed plan does not affect any BLM managed public lands or programs, therefore no additional coordination with our office is required. 6) TTSA: TTSA has reviewed the NOP and has no further comments at this time. 7) Truckee Donner Historical Society: The potential impacts of the Specific Pian on existing historic structures, and on the historic character of downtown, should be evaluated. Potential impacts to cultural and historic resources are evaluated in Chapter 10 of this EIR. 8) U.S. Army Corps of Engineers: The proposed Specific Pian will not conflict with any other project or programs within our jurisdiction. 9) Truckee Donner Public Utility District (TDPUD): The TDPUD provides electrical and water service to the DSA. We would like to work with the Town during EIR preparation to evaluate the impacts of future growth on our facilities. Potential impacts to electric and water services are described in Chapter 11 of this EIR. 10) Northern Sierra Air Quality Management District: The EIR should evaluate the effects of Downtown growth on future air quality. Potential impacts to air quality are described in Chapter 7 o,,fthis EIR 11) Tahoe Truckee Unified School District: The District will not be able to provide services & housing to future by students generated proposed development in downtown Truckee. The EIR Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 2-4 1 should evaluate this issue and provide mitigation. Impacts to school facilities are described in Chapter 1I - Public Services and Infrastructure 12) Caltrans: The EIR should address impacts to cultural resources and drainage, in addition to the need to realign Glenshire Drive at its intersection with SR 267, and provide improved access from SR 267 to Hilltop.. Impacts to cultural resources erre described in Chapter 10 - Cultural and Historic Resources, impacts on drainage systems are contained in Chapter 11 - Public Services and h!/rastructure, and impacts to traffic are contained in Chapter 4, Transportation and Circulation. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 2-5 IChapter 3 - POPULATION AND HOUSING A. Settin 1. Downtown Study Area Demographic Characteristics The DSA is contained entirely within block groups 1 through 5 of census tract 12.01. The following demographic information was compiled from 1990 census data. Most of Truckee's population growth over the last 20 years has occurred outside of the DSA_ As of the 1990 census, the population of the DSA was 516 persons. In 1990, the median age within the DSA was 33.6 years, slightly older than the Town as a whole. Approximately 92 percent of the study area population was under the age of 55 and approximately 55 percent of the population was under the age of 35. There were 146 children under the age of 18. Adults between the ages of 30 and 44 formed the greatest proportion of the population with nearly 50 percent of the total falling in �. this age bracket (see table 2-1). Approximately 45 percent of the population in 1994 was female. I�L n The racial and ethnic composition of Truckee has not changed significantly over the past century. The 1990 census data reveal a racial composition of 85 percent Caucasian in the DSA. Historically the dominant ethnicities were German, English, and Irish with influxes of Chinese and Italian immigrants. Of ancestries revealed by the 1990 census data, the majority of residents still report German, English, and Irish heritage. However, the percentage of persons of Hispanic origin within the DSA has increased over the past decades. With 54 persons of Hispanic origin (12 percent of total DSA population), the percentage of the DSA Hispanic population within the DSA is greater than the percentage within Town of Truckee as a whole. There are several demographic trends occurring within the DSA. Although the population of the study area has not increased significantly over the past few decades, the number and composition of households has. This is caused by the increase of women in the labor force, both within dual - income families and single parent households. Another significant trend is the rise of Hispanic immigrants to the region. The increase in the number of resident households, and the makeup of these households, will greatly affect the demand for housing, particularly housing that is considered affordable to the average income or lower income families. „ Based on the 1990 census data, there are 204 households in the study area. The average household size is 2.64 persons. Of the 204 households in the DSA only 47, or 23 percent, were renter occupied. This is significantly lower than the State average of 44 percent and lower than the Town distribution of 34.5 percent, indicating a need for units available for rent. Furthermore 34 of the total units were vacant, reserved for seasonal, recreational, or occasional use by their owners. The number of vacant units represents a lower percentage of second homes in the DSA than the Town as a whole, which has approximately 51% second homes, primarily in Tahoe Donner. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 3-1 1 2. DSA House Values and Contract Rents t 1990 census data reports that median monthly rent in the DSA was $654, this is lower than Truckee as a whole (median rent of $681 per month) and higher than that of Nevada county (median monthly rent of $598). Current real estate data indicates that the median monthly rent is rising. The 1990 median cost for owner occupied housing within the DSA is $128,600. 55 percent of these units cost over $125,000. The median monthly mortgage payment was $883 per month. Average DSA home values are low relative to rest of Truckee and to the State. ' As a major summer and winter recreation resort, the Truckee region experiences many housing problems associated with high seasonal migration_ Furthermore, there is a high amount of employment relative to housing in Truckee. Housing in Truckee is in the higher price range for j Nevada County, and jobs in the tourist industry are often low paying jobs. The combination of high housing prices, low wages, and an excess of jobs over housing may result in a large in - commute from areas where affordable housing is available. State housing policy recognizes that cooperative participation between the public and private sectors is necessary to expand housing opportunities to all economic segments of the community. Historically, the private sector has responded to the majority of the community's housing needs through the provision of market rate housing. However, due to economic conditions and trends in the state, the affordability of low density market rate housing is declining. Furthermore, additional commercial and industrial development could exacerbate the shortage of affordable housing in the area. The correlation between income deficiencies and housing problems (affordability and maintenance) indicates the need to assist very low and low income households with their housing needs. In addition to the challenge of meeting current housing needs, provision must also be made to satisfy the housing needs of the future. In general, it is reasonable to expect that low income families will, in many cases, continue to be unable to satisfy their housing needs through the market rate inventory, making government assisted housing programs essential. j D 3. SA Household Incomes Household incomes are one of the best indicators of the amount and type of business enterprises that would be supportable in any given market area. The median household income in -the study area in 1990 was $41,190. This is significantly higher that the State average of $33,901 and slightly higher than the median for the Town of Truckee, $40,012. However, 4I percent of households have an annual income less than $27,004 and 14 percent of households have an annual income less than $17,000. Per capita income in the study area was $18,341, compared with $17,468 for the whole of Truckee. Per capita income for residents of Hispanic ethnicity was only $6,294. 2.3 percent of the population in the DSA reported incomes below the US poverty level. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 3-2 4. Occupation and Employment Based can the 1990 census data, the largest number of employed people in the study area are involved in the service industry. Other categories that represent significant portions of the study area populations are construction and retail trade. 55 percent of the population is employed; this is 80 percent of the labor force. Women constitute 70 percent of the labor force, up considerably from 1984. This rise is in large part due to increased entry into the labor market and a rise in dual income families. The unemployment rate as of 1990 was 2.9 percent, much lower than the unemployment rate for the whole of Truckee (4.9 percent). 74 percent of the labor force worked more than 35 hours per week. Data reveals that 51 persons (20.5 percent) worked in another county and 13 (5 percent) worked in another state, showing significant job leakage. The average commute to work is 15.7 minutes, in comparison, only 44 percent of all employed residents in the State travel to work in under 20 ry minutes. The short commute times indicate that a large proportion of residents of the DSA work in the study area or within neighboring areas. `"-i Table 3-1 Population haracteristics for the DSA- 1990 - DSA Town of Truckee Population 516 8912 Age Distribution 0-17 30% 27% 18-34 26% 27% 35-54 37% 34% 7- 55+ 7% 12% z: Median Age 33.6 33 A6 Households 204 3295 Avg. Household size 2.6 2.7 Household Type families 57% 71.1% non -families 43% 28.9% Household Tenure renters 23% 34.5% owner-occ. 77% 65.5% IDowntown Truckee Specylc Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 3-3 �1 B. EvaluatiM_GuWelines I Impacts relating to housing are evaluated for significance based upon the following criteria: Evaluation of impacts will be conducted based on the potential for the proposed project to result in an effect on existing housing. Projects which restrict access to affordable housing or reduce actual numbers of (affordable) housing units would be considered to have a significant impact on housing. Popul'ition impacts are determined by the effect of the project on the population and growth rate of an area.i moacts Population: The Specific Plan will result in an increase in population in the DSA. With the increase in available housing supply, population will increase proportionally. This population increase is related to the projected growth accommodated town -wide by the Truckee General Plan, and will not represent an increase beyond what is planned for the Town. Because projected growth within the DSA is reasonable given the total amount of Town -wide growth projected in the Town of Truckee General Plan, the impact is not considered significant Housing: Buildout of the Specific flan would result in the addition of approximately 1400 residential dwelling units (@ 80% multi -family, 20% single-family) in the study area. A portion of these multi -family units may or may not turn out to be "affordable housing." Because it is the responsibility of each individual jurisdiction to provide its fair share of their particular region's affordable housing, more fully developed analysis of the issue is included in the Town of Truckee General Plan housing element, and is hereby incorporated by reference. The DSA will result in an increase in employment generating land uses. Significant impacts to housing could occur from potential conversion of affordable housing to mixed use commercial & office, and from additional housing demand created by growth in employment generating land uses. To provide residential units in proximity to employment, the Specific Plan encourages construction of new housing within the DSA through implementation of the policies listed below in Section D. D, hditigation Measurv5 I Volume 2 of the Downtown Specific Plan contains the following policies which will mitigate potentially significant impacts to affordable housing. The Specific Plan itself is not expected to amplify any existing housing problems, as increased housing opportunities are actually created by it. Therefore, any impacts relative to housing related concerns that may result from implementation of the Specific Plan will be mitigated to levels that are less than significant by implementation of the Town of Truckee General Plan Housing Element, and by the following Specific Plan Policies: Chapter 2. Land Use - Section 213, policies 1, 5,10 I Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 3-4 1 n IChapter 4 - CIRCULATION AND PARKING t A. Setting Traffic capacity is one of the primary constraints to development in the DSA. In order to quantify existing traffic conditions, and determine potentially significant traffic impacts created by implementation of the Downtown Specific Plan, Leigh, Scott, & Cleary Traffic Engineers conducted a detailed study of traffic in the DSA. The existing transportation and circulation setting is described in detail in Chapter 2 of their report, Tntckee Downtown CirculationStudy, July 1996, which is hereby incorporated by reference, and included as appendix A to this document. Existing parking conditions are described in Chapter 6 of the above referenced report. B. Evaluation Guidelines The Town of Truckee General Plan sets a level of service standard of "E" or better for intersections within the DSA. As explained in Chapter 2 of the Downtown Truckee Circulation Study, main intersections within the DSA are currently operating a levels of E & F. Traffic impacts are considered significant if they will result in LOS of F with projected growth accommodated by the Specific Plan . The following table illustrates definitions for the various Levels of Service. Level of ataige_ Signalised Intersection Unsigtlali7,ed Intersection Roadway(Daily) ¢ "A„ "C„ Uncongested operations, all queues clear in a single signal cycle. V/C < 0.50 Uncongested operations, all queues clear in a single signal cycle. VIC 0.51-0.70 Light congestion, occasional backups on critical approaches. VIC = 0.71-0.80 "Q" Significant congestions of critical approaches, but intersection functional. Cars required to wait through more than one cycle during short peaks. No long queues formed. VIC = 0.81.0.90 "E" Severe congestion with some long-standing queues on Little or no delay. Reserve capacity >400 Short traffic delays. Reserve capacity 300-399 Average traffic delays. Reserve capacity 204-299 Long traffic delays. - Reserve capacity 100-199 Completely free flow Free flow, presence of Other vehicles noticeable. Ability to maneuver and select operating speed affected Unstable flow, speeds and ability to maneuver severely impacted_ Very long traffic delays. At or near capacity, flow Failure, extreme congestion. quite unstable. IDowntown Truckee Specie pian - Draft Environmental Impact Report 4-1 critical approaches. Block- Reserve capacity 0-99 age of intersection may occur if traffic signal does not provide for protected turning movements. Traffic queue may block nearby intersection(s) upstream of critical approach(es). VIC = 0.91-1.00 "F" 'Total breakdown, stop -and -go Intersection blocked by Forced flow, total operation. VIC > 1.00 external causes. breakdown Sources: 1485 Highway Capacity Manual, Transportation Research Board (TRH) Special Report 209; VIC (volume to capacity) ratio ranges from TRS Circular 212. Parking impacts were evaluated based on the parking required to serve projected 20 year growth, and the capacity of existing parking areas to accommodate this projected demand. Circulation Impacts The traffic model and land use assumptions used to determine Specific Plan traffic impacts are P p p described in Chapter 4 of the Downtown Truckee Traffic Study. Traffic and circulation impacts from projected 20 year growth accommodated by the Specific Plan, and for general plan buildout, are described in Chapter 5 of the Study. Below is a summary of the impacts; Figure 19 of the Downtown Traffic Study (contained in appendix A) presents the results of the projected year 2015 and general plan buildout intersection operations analysis for the proposed specific plan. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact deport 4-2 1 A fundamental assumption of the traffic modeling effort was that the Highway 267 bypass would be constructed, resulting in a short term decrease in traffic in the DSA with diversion of existing through traffic to the Highway 267 Bypass. This decrease would provide capacity for future growth accommodated by the specific plan. Evaluation of intersection operations for 20 year projected growth indicate that all roadways in the DSA can operate at acceptable levels of service in the year 2015 without widening any roadways to four lanes. This will, however, require signalization of the following four intersections in the year 2015: BridgetnStreet f Comercial Row - Glenshire Drive 1 State Route 267 1 89 - Westbound I-80 off ramp SR 2671 SR North Figure 19 of the Downtown Traffic Study (contained in appendix A) presents the results of the projected year 2015 and general plan buildout intersection operations analysis for the proposed specific plan. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact deport 4-2 1 f� t In addition to needed signalization, growth accommodated by the Specific Plan will require an additional undercrossing of the railroad, primarily to serve projected development on the Mill site. The alignment for this undercrossing proposed in the Specific Plan is to the east of the balloon track. This is described in the Traffic Study as Alternative 7. The easterly undercrossing will most efficiently serve traffic with the construction of a bridge connecting East River Street to Highway 267. This bridge crossing was not shown to be necessary for traffic mitigation purposes within the 20 year time frame of the Specific Plan, however future plan updates should consider the necessity of this additional bridge crossing. The function of the easterly undercrossing is increased by the location of mill site parking at the easterly end, near the access for the undercrossing. In summary, the Traffic Study concludes that significant unmitigable impacts to traffic will not occur as a result of specific plan implementation, either with 20 year projected growth or with general plan buildout, as long as the Highway 267 Bypass is operational. However, prior to the construction of the Highway 267 bypass, which is currently scheduled for construction around the year 2000, there will be significant traffic impacts created by new growth in the downtown area in the form of incremental exacerbation of failing levels of service at the primary downtown intersection of Commercial Row 1 Bridge Street. Because traffic impacts will be significant and unmitigable in the interim prior to Bypass construction, a statement of overriding considerations for traffic impacts is required for Specific Plan adoption. ySubsequent to completion of the Downtown Specific Plan, a proposed initiative to amend the Truckee General Plan was circulated by a local citizens' group, the Mountain Area Preservation Foundation (MAPF). This initiative would reduce the commercial growth potential in PC -2 from 175,000 square feet to 25,000 square feet, and remove the potential for 340 rooms of lodging. The impact of such a land use change on the conclusions of the Downtown Traffic Study was evaluated by Leigh, Scott, & Cleary in a traffic model analysis done in June 1997. The conclusion of this study is that the land use changes envisioned in the MAPF initiative would not result in traffic impacts which change any conclusions in the previously prepared Downtown Traffic Analysis. A memo from LSC summarizing the results of the .lune 1997 analysis is contained in Appendix B. Future parking demand created by specific plan implementation is described on page 64 of the Traffic Study, Chapter 6. Figure 24 of Chapter 6 identifies projected parking surplus and deficit at year 2015. Within the area analyzed for parking, new development will create a need for an additional 1135 spaces (including the spaces required for the mill site area). If no additional parking was planned to serve this new development, a significant impact would result . Potential parking impacts can be mitigated by implementation of the parking strategies identified in the Specific Plan, and listed below in the mitigation section. IDowntown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 4-3 D. Traffic Mitigation Measures The Downtown Specific Plan identifies the following mitigation measures to reduce traffic impacts to less than significant levels: Specific Plan Chapter 3 - Section 313, Policies I though 7 - Section 3C, Projects 1 through 5. E. Parking- itigation Measures The Downtown Specific Plan identifies the following policies and improvement projects which will serve as mitigation measures to reduce impacts to parking to less than significant levels: Specific Plan Chapter 3: - Section 3E, Policies 1 though 13 - Section 3F, All listed streetscape improvements - Section 3G, Projects I through 7 - 'Section 3H, Projects I through 7 11 i L 1 t t Downtown Truckee Specific Alan - Draft Environmental Impact Reporl 4-4 Chapter 5 - LAND USE A.A. Setting This chapter discusses the existing land use conditions and patterns, and then examines the potential land use impacts that will potentially be associated with the development proposed by the Specific Plan. 1. Town of Truckee General Plan The General Plan for the "fown sets forth the following land use goals.for the Downtown Study Area: DSA 1. Preserve and enhance the historic mountain character of the Downtown Area, DSA 2. Identify and develop a town square. DSA 3. Identify mechanisms for creating a park 1 open space area with a trail along the Truckee River. i DSA 4. Increase opportunities for pedestrian circulation, including improved access across the railroad tracks, and improved access between parking areas and businesses. DSA 5. Address parking problems in the Downtown Area. DSA 6. Encourage residential uses mixed with office and commercial uses. DSA 7. Enhance the desirability of the Downtown Area as a "destination attraction." DSA 8. Study the potential for the old mill site to be a location for future mixed use development, including local and tourist serving commercial and public uses. DSA 9. Improve roadside landscaping. Reclaim portions of the "no man's land" around the railway. DSA 10. Identify funding mechanisms for Downtown improvements, including the potential for establishing a redevelopment district. 2. Existing Zoning Designations The Downtown Study Area includes several different zoning designations and combining designations. These zone districts will be modified by implementation of the Specific Plan, The existing zoning districts include: Residential (Single and Multiple Family), Commercial (Neighborhood, Community, and Highway), Manufacturing and Industrial, Office and IDowntown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 5-1 1 Professional, and Public. A description of each of these existing designations follows. R1 (Single Family Residential) The "RI" District is provided to establish low density residential land use for single family and related accessory uses and structures. Areas in the R I zone occur primarily along South River Street. R2 (Multiple Family Residential District) The "R2" District is provided to establish a low to medium density residential land use for single-family and multiple -family dwellings and related accessory uses and structures. R2 is the primary residential zone designation in the (north) Downtown area, and is located along East South River Street, Riverside Drive, and Keiser Avenue. R3 (Medium Density Multiple Family Residential) The "RY District is provided to establish high density multiple -family residential development. It is designed to facilitate development in urbanized areas. Coupled with planned development corn-bining district regulations, it can be utilized to take advantage of the condominium development technique to provide and preserve open space. One R3 zoned parcel is located along Trout Creek Rd. RA (Residential Agricultural) I The "RA" District is provided to promote residential / agricultural development and related land use structures. One RA zoned area is located within the DSA, at the junction of Hwy 267 and Glenshire road. It is part of a parcel owned by the United States Forest Service. C1 (Neighborhood Commercial The "CI" District is intended to provide for retail services directly related to the needs of the neighborhood area. In adaptation of this district to the neighborhood, adequate safeguards are established to integrate commercial use in harmony with the residential areas to which it is intended to serve. The C l district, in combination with a number of overlay district combinations, is the primary commercial designation in the study area. Parcels in the C 1 , designation are located along Donner Pass Road, West River Street, and 'Bridge Street. C2 (Community Commercial) ■ The "C2" District is intended to provide a wide range of retail and service uses that would relate to the varied needs of a community area or group of neighborhoods. This designation allows for more intensive commercial uses than the C1 designation. The only location of C2 zoning in the study area is on the southwest side of the Highway 267/1-80 interchange. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 5-2 hoped that a practice of conservation and enhancement of these resources can be established and maintained. The objectives of the Historic Preservation District are: to provide the �esign criteria to be used in determining the character and design of structures within the Historic District, and, to establish guidelines for the review and approval process with regard to any potential changes to these resources. Any proposed project that falls with the historic Preservation District must also meet the more general requirements of the Town of Truckee Design Guidelines.. B. Impact Evaluation Guidelines Any changes in land use designations, including proposed new designations, within the DSA which result in incompatible land uses in close proximity to each other could be classified as potentially significant impacts. Factors that determine incompatibility include: excessive noise, odors, and traffic impacts (see the chapters on noise, and traffic 1 circulation, within this document for specific thresholds of significance). Noise is usually one of the most significant factors in determining land use compatibility. Chapter 9 of this document provides a detailed analysis of noise issues. C. Impacts The Downtown Specific Plan sets forth overall land use policies for each of the 8 subareas that make.up the DSA, and identifies land uses and major public improvements which implement these policies. Chapter 2, Land Use, in Volume 2 of the Downtown Specific Plan describes in detail the land uses and projected growth in each of the sub -areas. The additional development accommodated by the Specific Plan will result in substantial growth within the DSA boundaries. This growth is consistent with the Town of Truckee General Plan's goals to accommodate "infill" development, and is not considered a significant impact. Development consistent with the Specific Plan could result in land use compatibility conflicts. Land use incompatibility occurs when the activities related to one land use negatively impact a different nearby land use. Such incompatibility may result from noise, odors, public access, traffic patterns, and lighting. Land uses that create potential incompatibilities are commercial, industrial, public facilities, recreational uses, etc. in close proximity to sensitive uses such as residential areas. The Downtown Specific Plan creates a "mixed use" land use designation which accommodates a range of residential, office, lodging, and commercial land uses. A mix of land uses in close proximity, in addition to the conversion of industrial uses along the river corridor to a mix of residential and commercial uses, could result in land use compatibility problems . Land use compatibility is further addressed in Specific Plan Chapters on Land Use, Environmental Conservation, Traffic Circulation, and Historic Resources. IDowntown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 5-5 t D. Mitigation Mgasurcs The following Specific Plan policies are intended to mitigate potential impacts resulting from land use compatibility to less than significant levels: Chapter 2 - Section 2B, policies 3 & 16 - Section 2E, policies 2 & 5 Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 5-6 1 Chapter 6 - SOILS, GEOLOGY, & GROUND CONTAMINATION A. Sgtting Soils resources are important to all aspects of the physical and biological environment. The value of any particular soi l type is measured by its abi 1 ity to support vegetation and fitter nutrients and sediments before they enter any downstream rivers, creeks, streams, drainages, etc. Soil provides a foundation and support for structures, roadways, and cuts and fills that are often necessary for their construction. Much of Truckee is underlain with glacial till, moraines, and outwash. These soils can be described as silty 1 sandy gravels, or gravelly l silty sands. Glaciers have transported large ivolumes of sediments from the crest of the Sierra Nevada to the west, and distributed them throughout the Truckee area as glacial deposits. Soils in the Truckee area have their origins in the results of this glacial outwash activity. In addition to the silts, sands, and gravels previously mentioned, these deposits also commonly include a range of cobbles and boulders ranging up to over one to two (or even several) tons. Typical soil depths are between 20 and 60 inches, except where surface boulders exist. Soils in and along the hanks of the Truckee River are similar to the rest of the soils in the DSA. However, because of the fact that silts, sands, and gravels are continually washed downstream and deposited as alluvial sediments, soils along the river have an even wider range of particle sizes and contain more nutrients. Boulders are also dispersed throughout the River and its banks. Much of the greater Truckee valley, including the DSA, was formed by volcanic deposits. These deposits originated as basaltic rock flows and ash flows. Several periods of glacial activity occurred during and after these volcanic periods, which resulted in the spreading and dispersion of these volcanic deposits. The soil types described above were parented from these geologic activities. Contamination of soil and groundwater within the DSA is a long standing problem that hinders investment in the area. Chapter 10 of the Existing Conditions Report (Downtown Specific Plan Volume 1) contains a list and map of the parcels within the DSA that are known to be contaminated. Cleanup of contaminated soils is generally triggered by a proposed development project or property transfer. The Town of Truckee is not directly responsible for requiring cleanup of this type of contamination. This responsibility primarily resides with the Lahontan Region of the California Water Quality Control Board and the Nevada County Environmental Health Department. B. Evaluation Guidelines The potential for erosion, landslides, mudflows, etc., are factors used in determining potentially significant soils impacts. Impacts will be considered significant where it can be shown that measurable increases in erosion would likely occur as a result of development. The drainage capacity of soils in any particular area is also important; soils that can absorb more moisture will Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 6-1 erode less because the amount of water moving over the surface is reduced. Development on I steeper slopes (generally those over 15% ) is a possibility in the DSA. Steeper slopes are located in the North Downtown Residential Subarea, along the south side of the Truckee River, and along the north side of Glenshire Drive. Geologic impacts occur when unique geologic or physical features are destroyed. Unique rock outcroppings occur in the DSA, which could be potentially affected by new development. Impacts relating to mineral resource extraction will not be significant. This is because the Mineral Land Classification Map for Eastern Nevada County (Loyd, 1990) classifies the DSA as Mineral Resource Zone - 4. MRZ-4 is defined as: areas of no known mineral occurrences where geologic information does not rule out either the presence or absence of significant mineral resources. There is substantial mining activity that occurs within the Town limits, but it is outside of the DSA boundaries. C Impacts Development allowed by the Specific Plan will result in grading, construction, and placement of structures, roads, and supporting facilities. This development will disrupt, displace, compact, and cover soil, and will- directly alter water absorption rates. In addition, surface water- runoff will be increased and redirected as new development occurs. As a result, soil and mineral resources ' could be adversely affected by growth in the DSA, particularly that growth which occurs in areas of significant slope. These impacts are potentially significant, and will require mitigation in order to reduce them to a less than significant level. I The displacement, disruption, compaction, and covering of soil by development activities will expose soils to wind and surface water and increase surface runoff. These factors will increase wind and water erosion of soils. Some of the soils in the DSA are located on moderate to steep slopes which have medium to rapid runoff and moderate to high erosion potential. Wind and water erosion impacts on soils may be significant. Development of structures and roads on areas of significant slope may create unstable earth conditions with large and unstable cut and fill banks which may lead to landslides or other geologic hazards. These (potentially) unstable earth conditions may expose people and property to related hazards. Potential impacts from construction in areas of contamination are currently addressed through the review of individual projects. Although significant impacts from soil contamination are somewhat mitigated by mandatory cleanup as a result of development or property transfer, issues of soil & groundwater contamination should be addressed on a more comprehensive scale and not on a "piecemeal basis. The Downtown Specific Plan contains policies directing the Town to coordinate with responsible agencies to develop methods for addressing the problem more comprehensively. I Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 6-2 1 1 1 i 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Miti i The following mitigation measures within the Specific Plan will reduce potential soils and geologic impacts to less than significant levels: Specific Plan Chapter 7 - Section 7C, policies 1 & 2 - Section 7F, policy 1 While not an impact the Town has the authority to mitigate, soil & groundwater contamination is addressed in the Downtown Specific Plan in the following policies' Specific Plan Chapter 7 - Section 7F, policies 1-3 Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 6-3 i IChapter 7 - AJR QUALITY A. SeItiny The climate of the Truckee air basin is characterized by cold, wet winters and mild summers. Temperatures in the Truckee basin typically show large seasonal and diurnal variations. These temperature variations, combined with the enclosed nature of the basin, create air basin characteristics which affect pollutant concentrations on a daily and seasonal basis. Meteorologically, the Truckee basin is subject to strong inversions and stagnant air conditions during much of the winter season. These conditions, coupled with wood burning and ether emissions, can result in very high short -tern PMio levels, and high seasonal levels as well. Because the Town is located on the eastern slope of the Sierra, it is well sheltered from the prevailing west-southwest wind pattern typical of much of California. Rimmed on all sides by mountains, emissions in the Truckee airshed are often trapped, with this effect multiplied under the predominant high-pressure, high -inversion (see below) winter weather pattern. Making ' matters worse, sustained colder temperatures in "dead of winter" days drive up woodstove use considerably, adding more particulate matter to the basin and exacerbating Truckee's poor air quality. Normally, air temperatures decrease as elevation increases. When a temperature inversion occurs, however, temperatures within a layer of air increase with height. The presence of a temperature inversion layer reduces or lowers the "mixing height" of the air, which results in less dispersion potential for pollutants in the air basin. Inversions trap pollutants near their emission source by preventing the vertical mixing process that is critical to the dispersion of airborne pollutants. As a result of these effects, the potential for significant pollutant concentrations is high during strong temperature inversion conditions, which frequently occur during winter months in the Truckee air basin. The main pollutants contributing to poor air quality are; carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (03), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), course particulates, and fine particulates (PMto). The major pollutant sources include woodstoves and suspended roadway dust and, to a lesser degree, automobiles. Carbon monoxide is a tasteless, odorless, and colorless gas which is somewhat lighter than air. Its poisonous effect on humans is caused by the replacement of oxygen with the compound in the bloodstream. Maximum CO concentrations occur during heavy episodes of traffic congestion which are accompanied by strong temperature inversions. Ozone is a group of complex oxidants that can be found in ambient air. 03 is not directly produced by combustion, but rather as a secondary pollutant that results from high hydrocarbon levels. Automobile emissions represent the primary (indirect) source of ozone pollution. 03 is created by a complex series of photochemical reactions involving hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen. Therefore, in order to control ozone pollution, it is necessary to control emissions of these other pollutants. Because ozone is a secondary Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 7-I t pollutant, maximum concentrations may be found miles downwind from the emission sources for the pollutants that lead to its creation. Particulates are airborne particulate matter caused by a combination of sources which , include fugitive dust from roads and construction sites, and combustion from woodstoves, amonf, otters. Particulates reduce visibility and lead to respiratory related health hazards, ' PMio is defined as inhalable particulate matter which is 10 microns or less in size, Simply stated, PMto is extremely "small" material that becomes easily lifted into or "entrained" in the air. As a general reference, one PMio particle is roughly one-eighth the thickness of a human hair, and one million PM to particles end-to-end would fit within one meter, or about 39 inches. PMio has a greater health effect than larger particles since the human body's respiratory system is unable to filter out these smaller particles. Once in the lungs, most PMio is not removed by the body's natural defense systems. These small particles may include toxins which can be absorbed by the blood and carried to other parts of the body. Those particles not absorbed can aggravate the lining of the lungs, causing irritation, inflammation, fluid accumulation, and reduced lung capacity. Air pollutant levels monitored within the project vicinity sometimes exceed state and/or federal standards for PMio. During the -winter months when inversion layers are low, and intensive residential wood burning occurs, PMto levels increase to their highest levels. However, the Town , recently adopted Ordinance 93-35 which sets air quality standards for solid fuel burning appliances, and should reduce future standards exceedences. B. Evaluation Effects on the quality of the air that would occur as a result of plan buildout will be evaluated for significance against the Federal Clean Air Act, the Town of Truckee Air Quality Management Plan for Particulate Matter, and the potential for creation of objectionable smoke, odors, ash, dust, or other respirable particulate matter (PMio). Because of the existing poor air quality conditions in the basin, any increase in PMio levels will be considered a significant impact. Furthermore, impacts that result in exceedenees of federal (Environmental Protection Agency) or state (California Air Resources Board) standards for carbon monoxide levels will be deemed significant, as well. The following table illustrates state and federal standards for various pollutants. �I Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 7-2 [11 Ll t 'J C. Impacts Development associated with the Specific Plan would lead to long term impacts relating to increased traffic volumes_ The primary source of new automobile emissions is additional vehicle trips resulting from increased residential density, non-residential projects, and increased tourist related traffic. Air quality impacts from an increase in CO levels will not be significant. This is evidenced by the General Plan's forecast of CO levels at DSA intersections of less than half of thestringent State of California standards at General Plan buildout (General Plan Volume IV Technical Analysis). Other potential impacts to air quality include increased airborne particulate matter resulting from fugitive dust escaping from construction sites, increased use of woodstoves which would increase particulate matter (PMto) generation, and road sanding. The disruption and displacement of soils caused by grading and other development activities will expose soils to wind patterns. Once the soil is lifted by the wind, the soil will become airborne particulate shatter which may decrease air quality and visibility. The level of particulate generation depends on soil moisture, wind speed, activity level, and silt content of the soil. These impacts would also be short term, however, and would subside after construction activities ceased. Furthermore, impacts to air quality which result from fugitive dust generation can be successfully mitigated to less than significant levels through preventative measures such as watering (see mitigation measures below). Any increase in particulate matter that might be produced by wood stove use will be considered to be a significant impact, based upon the evaluation criteria outlined above. Increased airborne particulate matter resulting from road sanding, which would also add to PM 10 related impacts, would only be mitigated through reduced amounts of sand placed, or alternative substances being used. According to the Truckee General Plan, approximately 1445 tons of PMio is currently generated each year on a Town -wide basis. It has been determined that 15% of Truckee's PMio occurs as a direct result of residential wood burning. This means that nearly 200 tons of respirable Downlown Truckee Specific flan - Draft Environmental Impacl Reporl 7-3 Pollutant California Standard Federal Standard Carbon Monoxide 6 ppm (8 hr. avg. Concentration) 4 ppm (8 hr. avg.) 20 ppm (1 hr avg) 35 ppm (1 hr. avg.) LOzone 0.09 (1 hr. avg.) 0.12 (1 hr. ppm ppm avg,) Nitrogen Dioxide 41.25 ppm (1 hr, avg.) 0.05 ppm (24 hr. avg.) 0.053 ppm (annual average) (annual average) Suspended Particulate 50 micrograms per 150 micrograms per Matter (PMIo) cubic meter cubic meter (24 hours) (24 hours) Source: Draft Environmental Assessment 1 Negative Declaration for the Meyers C mmunily Plan Prepared by El Dorado County Planning Department, August, 1993. [11 Ll t 'J C. Impacts Development associated with the Specific Plan would lead to long term impacts relating to increased traffic volumes_ The primary source of new automobile emissions is additional vehicle trips resulting from increased residential density, non-residential projects, and increased tourist related traffic. Air quality impacts from an increase in CO levels will not be significant. This is evidenced by the General Plan's forecast of CO levels at DSA intersections of less than half of thestringent State of California standards at General Plan buildout (General Plan Volume IV Technical Analysis). Other potential impacts to air quality include increased airborne particulate matter resulting from fugitive dust escaping from construction sites, increased use of woodstoves which would increase particulate matter (PMto) generation, and road sanding. The disruption and displacement of soils caused by grading and other development activities will expose soils to wind patterns. Once the soil is lifted by the wind, the soil will become airborne particulate shatter which may decrease air quality and visibility. The level of particulate generation depends on soil moisture, wind speed, activity level, and silt content of the soil. These impacts would also be short term, however, and would subside after construction activities ceased. Furthermore, impacts to air quality which result from fugitive dust generation can be successfully mitigated to less than significant levels through preventative measures such as watering (see mitigation measures below). Any increase in particulate matter that might be produced by wood stove use will be considered to be a significant impact, based upon the evaluation criteria outlined above. Increased airborne particulate matter resulting from road sanding, which would also add to PM 10 related impacts, would only be mitigated through reduced amounts of sand placed, or alternative substances being used. According to the Truckee General Plan, approximately 1445 tons of PMio is currently generated each year on a Town -wide basis. It has been determined that 15% of Truckee's PMio occurs as a direct result of residential wood burning. This means that nearly 200 tons of respirable Downlown Truckee Specific flan - Draft Environmental Impacl Reporl 7-3 1 generated on a Town -wide basis. I As stated above, any increases in PMio generation will be considered to constitute significant impacts. While there are mitigation measures listed below that are meant to reduce the effects of ' these adverse impacts, it will not be possible to mitigate all air quality impacts to non-significant levels because of the strict evaluation guidelines for standards of significance (which result from the poor air quality that often dominates the Truckee area). The Town of Truckee is currently in the process of preparing an Air Quality Management Plan to create a long-term strategy for reducing PMI0 to acceptable levels. At this time the Plan is not adopted. As a result, a Statement of Overriding Considerations will be prepared prior to adoption of the Specific Plan, because of the significant adverse impacts to air quality that will remain after mitigation, at least prior to implementation of and adopted Air Quality Management Plan. Installation of natural gas in the DSA .may replace some existing wood stoves, resulting in a decline in PM 10 levels over time. Development activity resulting from adoption of the Specific Plan is not anticipated to alter air movement, moisture content or temperature, or introduce a change in the local or regional climate. Furthermore, beneficial impacts would result from the completion of the regional (bicycle 1 ski 1 pedestrian) trail system through the DSA, which would encourage people to use alternative transportation modes. D. Mitigation Measures I The impacts to air quality from additional increases in particulate matter will be significant. Successful mitigation of this impact to less than significant levels is not possible due to the existing conditions of air quality in the air basin. Since air quality issues must be addressed on a regional basis, the Town is in the process of preparing an "Air Quality Management Plan' for the Truckee air basin. This plan will identify programs to be implemented Town -wide with the goal Downtown Truckee ,specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 7-4 1 particulate matter is produced annually by woodstoves in the approximately 9000 dwelling units that currently exist within the Town boundaries; each dwelling unit is responsible for the production of 40-50 lbs. of PMio each year, on the average. Given the proposed residential buildout of the DSA of over 600 dwelling units, the additional PMio to be generated from this source at buildout would be nearly 15 tons per year. Actual levels should be substantially less than this because of further mitigation measures such as restrictions on the number of chimneys permitted per residential unit and new EPA standards for woodstoves. Nevertheless, associated impacts would still be significant. Road dust (54%) and construction activities (19%) are the other major contributors to PM10 levels. Construction and demolition might produce a higher percentage of the DSA's particulate matter during the build out phases of plan development, as this type of activity will likely be intensive (but short term) at certain times. Respirable particulate matter that originates as road dust will likely account for less then half of the increase in PMio generated in the DSA, because of the relatively small amount of new road -miles proposed (as well as the low travel speeds that occur) within the DSA. Vehicular emissions sources for account for only 2% of the PMio generated on a Town -wide basis. I As stated above, any increases in PMio generation will be considered to constitute significant impacts. While there are mitigation measures listed below that are meant to reduce the effects of ' these adverse impacts, it will not be possible to mitigate all air quality impacts to non-significant levels because of the strict evaluation guidelines for standards of significance (which result from the poor air quality that often dominates the Truckee area). The Town of Truckee is currently in the process of preparing an Air Quality Management Plan to create a long-term strategy for reducing PMI0 to acceptable levels. At this time the Plan is not adopted. As a result, a Statement of Overriding Considerations will be prepared prior to adoption of the Specific Plan, because of the significant adverse impacts to air quality that will remain after mitigation, at least prior to implementation of and adopted Air Quality Management Plan. Installation of natural gas in the DSA .may replace some existing wood stoves, resulting in a decline in PM 10 levels over time. Development activity resulting from adoption of the Specific Plan is not anticipated to alter air movement, moisture content or temperature, or introduce a change in the local or regional climate. Furthermore, beneficial impacts would result from the completion of the regional (bicycle 1 ski 1 pedestrian) trail system through the DSA, which would encourage people to use alternative transportation modes. D. Mitigation Measures I The impacts to air quality from additional increases in particulate matter will be significant. Successful mitigation of this impact to less than significant levels is not possible due to the existing conditions of air quality in the air basin. Since air quality issues must be addressed on a regional basis, the Town is in the process of preparing an "Air Quality Management Plan' for the Truckee air basin. This plan will identify programs to be implemented Town -wide with the goal Downtown Truckee ,specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 7-4 1 of bringing particulate matter levels below State and Federal standards. Since this plan in not yet adopted, a Statement of Overriding Considerations is necessary for air quality impacts prior to adoption of the final Specific Plan. In the interim, general plan policies listed under Conservation & Open Space Element Goal #I I will help reduce impacts from PM 10. 1 i IDowntown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 7-5 tChapter 8 - NOISE ' A. Setting Noise is usually defined as "unwanted sound." Any sound that may produce physiological or psychological damage and/or interfere with human communication, work, rest, recreation, or sleep is considered to be noise. People now recognize that noise has become an environmental pollutant that can threaten their duality of life. I Sound energies and intensities are measured in decibels (dBA) that are weighted to correct for the relative frequency response of the human ear. For example, an A -weighted noise level includes a de -emphasis on high frequencies of sound that can be heard by the canine ear, but not by a human ear. The zero on the decibel scale is based on the lowest sound level that a healthy, unimpaired human ear can detect. Unlike other units such as inches or pounds, decibels are measured on a logarithmic scale, representing points on a sharply rising curve. The decibel system of measuring sound gives a rough connection between the physical intensity of sound and its perceived loudness to the human ear. Ambient sounds generally range from 30 dBA (very quiet) to 100 dBA (very loud). The major sources of noise in the DSA include automobile, truck, and train traffic. Downtown Truckee is noisier than most downtowns as a result of the regular freight and passenger train activity that occurs in the heart of the DSA at all hours of the day and night, and from the freeway traffic on 1-80. The noise level of freight train at a distance of 50 feet can be more than 80 decibels (dBA). A busy street has a noise level of 75 dBA at a similar distance. These noise levels are generally considered to be compatible with mast non-residential uses, however, and usually pose no real problems to the commercial uses in this area. Actually, the train activity in I the DSA is often a benefit to the historical atmosphere, and therefore the tourist economy, of the Town. The speed of both vehicles and trains as they pass through downtown Truckee are ' generally slow, and therefore they are not as loud as they otherwise might be. 1 t 1-1 Interstate 80 defines the northern boundary of the DSA. Noise levels at 50 feet from this source of noise are estimated to be 70 dBA. This level of noise is generally considered to be incompatible with the residential land uses located in this area. Because the highway is raised above most of these homes; they are not within a direct line of sight to the freeway, and the noise levels they are subjected to are reduced somewhat. B. Evaluation Guid$r ines Environmental impacts that are associated with noise will be evaluated against the General Plan Noise Element and the associated projected noise levels, specifically, Standards contained in General Plan Table 6.1 for land use compatibility with noise. Noise impacts will also be evaluated against the standards for acceptable site-specific noise levels, depending on land use type, which are outlined below. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 8-I 1 J Physical damage to human hearing begins at prolonged exposure to more than 85 decibels. Exposure to high noise levels effects our entire system, with prolonged noise exposure in excess of 75 decibels increasing body tension, affecting blood pressure, functions of the heart, and the nervous system. Extended periods of noise exposure above 90 dBA will result in permanent cell damage. A sound level of 190 dBA will rupture the car drum and permanently damage the inner ear. ' Noise impacts are be considered to be significant if any of the following conditions exist: exterior noise levels in outdoor activity areas reach 65 dBA CNEL at any residential land use, or 75 dBA CNEL at office, industrial, commercial, or recreational land uses. If and when it has been determined that noise levels of these magnitudes could be realized, appropriate mitigation measures will be required to be implemented that reduce noise to below these levels. C. Impacts Noise impacts due to buildout of the DSA Specific Plan are anticipated to be primarily associated with rail and roadway traffic noise. However, increased noise levels resulting from the intensification of land uses could also occur. In addition, there will almost certainly be short term noise impacts that result from construction activities associated with DSA development. All of these noise impacts will add to the existing noise environment which consists mainly of noise from the following sources; Interstate 80, State Route 257, Danner Pass Road, West River Street, and the Union Pacific (UP) railroad line. The Specific Plan land uses have been designed to separate high-level noise generators from sensitive noise receptors, and design review development standards will be established to require landscaping and screening between noise generators and sensitive noise receptors. Noise impacts will be further mitigated by measures listed under (D) below. The Town of Truckee General Plan noise analysis identifies future General Plan Buildout noise contours for major noise generators in the DSA. These noise contours are identified in Table 6.2 of the General Plan Noise Element, hereby incorporated by reference. Based on the location of the future 65 dBA, CNEL noise contours, there is a likelihood that new residential development could be proposed in areas subject to noise levels higher than 65 dB CNEL. Such areas include residentially designated properties near 1-80 and the Railroad tracks, and mixed use properties with a residential component along Donner Pass Road and West River Street. The mill site, located east of the lumber yard and north of the Truckee River, is subject to combined noise from planes departing from the airport and nearby railroad activity. Residential uses should be limited to interior locations where noise can be blocked by intervening buildings to reduce exterior noise levels to 55 CNEL. Because it is not possible to foresee all the permissible uses and associated noise sources which may be proposed within the DSA, a more detailed analysis of potential noise sources and resulting; noise levels will need to be conducted when site-specific projects are proposed. Downrown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 8-2 Ll t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 D. Mitigation Measures The following Specific Plan noise policies will reduce noise impacts to less than significant levels; Specific Plan Chapter 7 - Section 7D, policies 1 through 4 In addition to the mitigation measures set forth above, the Town of Truckee General Plan Noise Policies contained in the Noise Element are incorporated by reference into this document as further mitigation for potential noise impacts. 8 Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report -3 1 1 1 1 1 Chapter 9 - BIOLOGICAL AND SCENIC RESOURCES A cttin The majority of the DSA is relatively flat. The extreme southern and northern portions of the study area (beyond Jibboom Street around the cemetery, the residential area between Commercial Row and 1-80, as well as portions of the Hilltop area) are the only areas of significant slope. The Truckee River runs through the entire length of the DSA, and Trout Creek flows through the eastern portion before draining into the Truckee River. The riparian areas in, and surrounding these waterways, support the majority of the significant habitats for wildlife and vegetation in the DSA. Because of the elevation, climate, and topography of the DSA, populations of plants and animals present are consistent with those of the Canadian Life Zone. Specific species are listed below. 1. Vegetation Types and Patterns The riparian areas and woodlands in and around the DSA are highly valued for wildlife habitats, watershed protection, erosion control, open space, aesthetic and scenic amenities, and recreation. A wide variety of vegetation types and patterns exist in these undeveloped areas. These undeveloped wildlands are located in the extreme southeastern portion of the DSA (subarea 44; Truckee River corridor). Typical examples of native trees in and around the DSA include Jeffrey Pine, Lodgepole Pine, Pinion Pine, Incense Cedar, Alder, Willow, Cottonwood, and Aspen. Besides trees, there are many species of shrubs and bushes and that are native to the DSA. Among these are: Sagebrush, Bitter -brush, Butterbrush, Mountain Mahogany, Utah Juniper, Com Lily, Buckwheat, Shrub Pea, and Fireweed. The diversities and densities of the various vegetation communities are perhaps most important because of the habitat value that they provide. Among the uses these habitats provide are foraging, nesting, hiding, breeding, fawning, etc. 2. Wildlife There is an abundance of wildlife in and around the DSA. Specifically, wildlife species that have habitats in and near the DSA include: Deer, Desert Jack Rabbit, American Badger, Beaver, Pocket Mouse, Kangaroo Rat, Ground Squirrel, Chipmunk, Mule Deer, +Chickaree, Long -Toed Salamander, Pacific Tree Frog, Yellow -Legged Frog, Western Fence Lizard, Sagebrush Lizard, Horned Lizard, and Western Rattlesnake. Wildlife movement corridors generally consist of areas of continuous, undisturbed vegetation such as the riparian corridor along the Truckee River_ Among the various species of birds that occupy the area are. Turkey Vulture, Nighthawk, American Dipper, Band -tailed Pigeon, Dark -eyed Junco, Mountain Chickadee, Mountain Bluebird, American Robin, Townsend's Solitaire, Stellar's Jay, Pinion Jay, Chipping Sparrow, Song Sparrow, Cliff Swallow, Red -breasted Nuthatch, Black -Billed Magpie, Grey Flycatcher, Vesper Sparrow, Blue Sparrow, Willow Fly {Catcher, Northern Goshawk, Black Swift, and Downtown Truckee Specific Flan - Drafl Environmental Impact Report 9-1 Yellow Warbler. Fish that can be found in the waterways associated with the DSA include Eastern Brook Trout, Mackinaw Trout, Brown Trout, Rainbow Trout, Lahontan Mountain Ephemeral Trout, and Lahontan Lake Trout. While it is true that there are habitat areas in eastern Nevada County for certain plant and animal species known to be rare, threatened, endangered, or sensitive (far instance, Plumas ivesia, Tahoe yellow cress, Sierra Nevada red fox, wolverine, American peregrine falcon, Northern spotted owl, Yellow warbler, Slack swift, Willow flycatcher, and Northern goshawk), and that it is possible that these species could occasionally occur in the study area, it is important to note that none of these habitat areas - nor the associated species - have been confirmed to exist within the boundaries of the DSA. Chapter 9 of the Existing Conditions Report (Specific Plan - volume 1) contains further information regarding the biological inventory of the DSA, as it exists today. This documentation is incorporated by reference into this report. 3. Scenic Resources Scenic resources are of great importance in 'Truckee because of the quality of life they provide and their indirect economic benefits from the tourist economy. Significant visual resources include prominent ridgelines, open vistas, streams, and river views. Scenic detriments to such resources include litter and pollution, vandalized areas, blighted development, unsightly signs and billboards, and unscreened storage areas. The most obvious areas where scenic detriments exist include East River Street where there are several unscreened storage areas for heavy equipment, abandoned vehicles, and assorted junk. West River Street also contains several industrial land uses that create scenic detriments, such as unscreened outdoor storage. Perhaps the worst example this kind of problem is the standard practice of placing unsightly billboards at the gateway entrances to Downtown Truckee. 4. Water Quality Existing water quality within the DSA is currently impaired by a number of different sources. The maintenance of roadways and vehicular traffic serves as a significant source of pollutants.. Salt and sand used on streets and highways during winter months are introduced into surface runoff during snowmen and precipitation events. Vehicle emissions and lubricating agents which leak from vehicles also contribute to the degradation of surface runoff quality. Automotive combustion effluents containing nitrogen oxides are discharged into the atmosphere and onto roadway surfaces. These pollutants are then introduced into surface runoff through atmospheric deposition or dissolution into runoff. Fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and litter and debris are also significant sources of pollution associated with urban land use. Presently, much of the stormwater runoff produced in the DSA is discharged directly into the Truckee River or Trout Creek. The rest percolates through the soil and into groundwater. B, Evaluation(auidelines 1. Vegetation & Wildlife: Potential impacts to biotic corn nunities will be evaluated on the basis of. reduction in the extent, diversity, or quality of native vegetation and animal species, as well as their associated habitats. Because it is not possible to determine the precise numbers of plants Downtown Truckee Specific Plum - Draft Environmental Impact Report 9-2 7, .1 11 and animals affected by adoption of the Specific Plan, careful tracking of biotic resources will be essential in identifying, mitigating, and monitoring impacts that effect them. 2. Scenic Resources: The determination of impact significance relating to scenic resources is perhaps the most subjective of all analyses, because people have differing opinions as to what constitutes a visual asset or detriment. In general, scenic resources will be adverserly affected by location of prominent buildings on undeveloped ridgelines, new or expanded unsightly land uses visible from public roads, and clear cutting of native vegetation and mass pad grading. 3. Water Quality_ All new development can potentially cause changes in percolation rates, drainage patterns, flood flows, contamination levels, and/or runoff amounts. Any of these types of impacts will be classified as potentially significant water quality impact requiring mitigation. C. Impacts 1. 'Vegetation & Wildlife: There is a potential for significant impacts to biological resources as a result of increased development in the DSA because of the wide range of plant and animal species and habitat present, particularly along the riparian corridors of the Truckee River and its tributaries. Examples of such possible impacts include removal of sensitive riparian habitat, the invasion of exotic plants, increased human use of fragile habitat, disturbances by domestic dogs and cats, and the dispersion of pollutants through runoff into the storm drain system or DSA waterways. Other potential impacts relative to biological resources include: wildlife disturbance created by increased noise and lighting and increased erosion and sedimentation to DSA waterways, resulting in a degradation of fish habitat. The maintenance of healthy riparian habitats is essential for the viability of the plants and animals that rely on them. Riparian vegetation is critical to maintaining healthy fisheries. Loss of riparian vegetation leads to bank erosion, reduction of wildlife habitat, overheating of river waters, and ultimately reduced water quality. Within the DSA, areas of valuable riparian habitat exist along the Truckee River and its tributaries of Trout Creek and Donner Creek. Portions of the existing habitat along Trout creek are heavily degraded by channelization and fill encroachment. In some areas of the Truckee River the riparian habitat has been removed to make way for residential lawns. Specific Plan policies have been developed to ensure that new development does not further degrade the riparian habitat present in the DSA. Furthermore, policies have been added to encourage habitat improvement along these waterways. 2. Scenic Resources: Impacts to scenic and visual resources occur when buildings are located prominently on previously undeveloped ridges or in scenic areas with little regard for blending with the surrounding environment. Implementation of the identified specific plan policies, which strive to ensure compatible designs, will mitigate these potential adverse visual impacts to a less than significant level. On the whole, however, impacts to scenic resources that result from adoption of the Specific Plan will be beneficial. The mountains surrounding the DSA will be unaffected, for the most part, while the visual quality of the study area itself should actually be improved by the implementation of Specific Plan Design Guidelines, as well as other measures Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - ,Draft Environmental Impact Report 9-3 intended to remedy existing visual clutter, inappropriate billboards, and blight. I Specific Plan Chapter 2 - Section 213, policy 3 ' 3. Water [duality: According to the California Regional Water Quality Control Board - Lahontan, the "beneficial uses" of the Truckee River include: most types of water supply, ' recreation, wildlife habitat, ground water recharge, and hydropower generation. While the majority of these uses occur outside of the DSA, activities and events that affect water quality that occur within the DSA will have an impact on downstream waters. Therefore, improved treatment of runoff will be a necessary component of mitigation where water quality is concerned ' (see impacts and mitigation measures below). Development resulting from implementation of the Specific Plan (as well as previously existing development) may result in the disturbance of the watershed's natural system. Such development interferes with the natural drainage process in , three ways. First, the removal of vegetative cover decreases the infiltration rate, increases the amount of surface water runoff and erosion, and decreases the uptake of nutrients by plants. Second, an increase in impervious surfaces (such as parking lots) decreases infiltration and ' increases surface runoff, which in turn increases erosion. Third, unstable conditions are created by areas left bare and by cut and fill slopes, which also increase downstream runoff and sediment loads. Impacts resulting from increased surface runoff, deposition, siltation, erosion, and modification of drainage channels and patterns are potentially significant without mitigation. D. Mitigation Measures The following Specific Plan policies will mitigate potentially significant impacts on biological 1 and scenic resources and water quality to a less than significant level. Specific Plan Chapter 2 - Section 213, policy 3 ' -Section 2G, policies 1,7,9,10 Specific Flan Chapter 7 - Section 713, policies 1 through 7 ' -Section 7C, policies 1 & 2 - Section 7F, policies I & 2 Specific Plan Chapter 9 - Section 9C, policy 4 n u fl Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 9-4 1 1 1 Chapter 10 - CULTURAL AND HISTORIC RESOURCES I A. Settin Historic Background The Town of Truckee is one of the richest locations in California in terms of the density and variety of both cultural and historic resources. Virtually all of the Town is considered moderately to extremely sensitive with regard to the presence of cultural resources. The DSA is home to a high concentration of structures that have historical significance . These historic structures are preserved and incorporated into modern Town life in the historic district of downtown Truckee. Areas that are moderately sensitive in terms of cultural resources tend to be associated with hilI slopes. Areas that are flatter, but removed from water sources, tend to be of high cultural sensitivity_ Many areas along the Town's waterways, particularly flatter areas, are of extreme cultural sensitivity. The precise locations of these resources, particularly prehistoric archaeological sites from the Martis and other cultures, are considered confidential. These locations are only released by the State Archaeological Information Center to qualifiers archaeologists doing site specific surveys. "Historic," as defined by 'Webster's New Collegiate Dictionary, is something "of, relating to, or having the character of history" with history comprising past events of an institution or location. The Town of Truckee is one of the richest locations in California in terms of the density and variety of recorded cultural resources. Virtually all of the Town is considered moderately to extremely sensitive in terms of cultural resources. In order to regulate future development in the historic district, in 1982, the Nevada County Board of Supervisors established a Historic Preservation District for the Truckee Downtown area and adopted historic design guidelines. These historic design guidelines represent the historic period dating from the late 1800's through the early 1900's. Historic planning districts are established to ensure that new buildings are compatible with the existing historic buildings in the area. For planning purposes, the established time period provides the current definition for "historic" in the DSA, and the type of buildings built in this time period provide the base guidelines for the architectural design of new structures in the historic district. ' The modern history of Truckee begins in 1.863 when Gray's Toll Station, later renamed Coburn Station, was founded in the Downtown area. Like many western towns that were founded in the ' 19th century, the streets of the hastily renamed Town of Truckee were roughly laid out in a rectangular grid pattern parallel to the railroad tracks. Because Donner Pass Road was the street next to the railroad tracks, and was the regional access road, it became the main street of commerce and activity of the town. Numerous commercial buildings were constructed along the north side of Donner Pass Road immediately west of Bridge Street. In order to withstand the fury of the numerous fires which swept the town throughout its history, many of these commercial buildings were constructed of brick. In addition, some of these commercial buildings are two stories in height. The south side of Donner Pass Road is Southern Pacific railroad right -of --way, ' Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Import Report 10-1 and development on this side of the street was not as forthcoming as the north side. A railroad freight depot and passenger depot which are still standing and in use were built in this area. The north side of Donner Pass Road from Bridge Street to the Cottage Hotel is the area most developed with historic structures, with more than 90% of the street frontage occupied by historic buildings. Further to the west along Donner Pass Road, a residential neighborhood known as Brickelltown arose in the area previously occupied by the original Coburn's station. Some of the oldest residences are found in Brickelltown. The Church Street neighborhood provided another residential area for early Truckee and also was home to the Methodist Church and Catholic Church. The Town's oldest structure, Cray's log cabin built in 1863, was relocated to the Church Street neighborhood in 1903. The construction of Highway 267 in 1949 significantly impacted the cohesiveness of the neighborhood by bisecting the neighborhood. The eastern end of the neighborhood has slowly eroded with only two historic structures remaining. By the 1870's, the area between the railroad tracks and the Truckee River was developing with a mixture of residences and commercial structures. The existing historic structures of the River Street neighborhoods are varied in age and architectural type because of several fires which resulted in their rebuilding. The area south of the Truckee River developed as the neighborhood for Truckee's Chinese residents. The Chinese were soon forced out of the Town, and the Chinatown 1 South Truckee and South River neighborhoods became home to new businesses and residences. There are only four remaining historic structures in these neighborhoods, including .r the only remaining historic structure of the Chinese community (the Herb Shop on the corner of Hwy. 267 and East South River Street). By 1885, the town had quickly expanded to the hilly terrain north of Donner Pass Road. This area became a prime residential neighborhood because of the southern exposure and view of the Downtown area. The Burckhaulter Area along Bridge Street and Keiser Avenue was developed in the 1870's and contains some of the town's oldest residential buildings. It also has a diverse array of residential architectural types including Victorian, Bungalow, Utilitarian, Italianate, and Box. Spring Street was extended north to provide access to another residential neighborhood north of the Downtown core: Charles McGlashan's subdivision now known as the McGlashan Addition. The McGlashan Addition contains a number of residential buildings constructed between 1885 and 1907, and like the Burckhaulter Area, residences of varied architectural types. Some historic buildings along the northern edge of the neighborhood were removed as a result of the construction of Interstate 80. The last residential neighborhood north of the Downtown core was settled by Italian Families along the banks of Trout Creek in the 1890's. Unlike the Burckhaulter Area and McGlashan Addition, the Italian Quarters lacks the identification of an historic neighborhood since only two historic buildings remain. The neighborhood also lacks any evidence of the ice harvesting business which played an important role in the development of the area. The number of historic structures and their predominant structure type and architectural style for each historic neighborhood are provided in the following table. Downtown Truckee .Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 10-2 L u ITabled -1: Number of hiss do structures f structure type & style. Neighborhood ist ric Building Count Structure Trine Architectural Tyue Brckelltown 17 Residential UtilitarianNernacular Victorian Burckhaulter 13 Residential Vcrnacular Victorian Chinatown 1 South Truckee 2 Residential l Commercial Utilitarian Church Street 19 Residential Utilitarian/Victorian Commercial District 28 Commercial Vernacular Commercial Italian Quarter 2 Residential Utilitarian McGIashan Addition 16 Residential Utilitarian Moody Extension 5 Residential Vernacular Victorian River Street 30 Residential 1 Commercial Utilitarian South River 2 Residential Utilitarian -(Source: Town of Truckee Historical Resources Inventory and Database) 2. Historic Buildings Inventory The DSA has a rich collection of historic buildings dating from the 1870°s to the 1930's. There is a mixture of commercial structures and residential structures spread throughout the DSA with many residential structures, especially those along Donner Pass Road, being converted to commercial uses. Nearly half of the structures in the DSA are considered to be historic, with large concentrations of historic buildings along Commercial Row, Jibboom Street, and River Street. Figure 6.2 in the Existing Conditions Report (Volume 1) shows the exact locations of the historic buildings to be found in the DSA. 3. Commercial Row The area of Donner Pass Road known as Commercial Row has the highest concentration, by far, of historic buildings anywhere in Town. Twenty-one of the twenty-two buildings located here are officially designated as historic structures. The diversity of the various buildings might be somewhat surprising, considering the close proximity of the structures, and the fact that they (originally, at least) were constructed around the same historical period. Due to the chronic fire ' prone nature of Truckee around the turn of the century, practically every one of these buildings Downtown Truckee Speck Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 10-3 1 has been destroyed and rebuilt several times during, and 1 or since, that time period. The newest of these structures (the Porter -Simon building) is brand new, having been completed just this ' year. The vast majority of the structures (14 of 22) are two-story. Four are three-story, Three are one- story, and on.: (Sierra Tavern) is four stories tall. There are eleven buildings that are constructed ' entirely of brick and concrete block. These buildings are concentrated at each end of Commercial Row. Most of the structures in the middle of the strip are at least partially brick, with stucco or , wood used in combination. Furthermore, the historic structures in this part of the DSA are in better physical condition than any others, mainly because of the maintenance necessary keep successful businesses operational. ' Generali speaking, Commercial Row has a pleasant visual appearance, at least from the Donner Y F pP Pass Road side. The recently improved sidewalk is made up of several different patterns of custom brick shapes in combination with a variety of concrete finishes. The walk is continuously ' covered on the western 113, mostly by 2nd story balconies above. The remainder of the Commercial Row sidewalk (which is open to the sky above) is perhaps even more appealing to the pedestrian, because of the landscaping, planters, and benches that encourage a slower pace. ' Details such as the old lampposts -and the scale of signage and storefronts help keep the pedestrian visually interested and involved as well. I Few stores have access from the alley behind Commercial Row, and most actively discourage it. The alley is essentially used for some employee access, deliveries, and trash and garbage ' collection. Even if shops offered customer access from this alley, it would not likely be well- received considering the current dilapidated condition of the area. It seems that the alley should be improved, or at the least kept clean, but activities related to waste disposal and deliveries will ' probably need to remain behind the businesses located there. This will make it difficult to incorporate appealing public access into the alley streetscape. , 4. Other Historic Structures in the DSA Besides Commercial Row, the DSA includes several other historic districts. Among these are: Brickelltown, the Burckhaulter District, the McGlashan Addition, the Church Street Area, and ' the River Street Area. , Brickelltown extends from just past the west end of Commercial Rory to the 1-80 over crossing. This area is known for its large Utilitarian and Victorian style residences, many of which have been converted to commercial uses. The buildings in this area are made almost exclusively from wood. The Burckhaulter District is located on the hill behind Commercial Row along High Street and Keiser Avenue. The one and two story residential structures found here are of similar architectural style (Vernacular Victorian) to Brickelltown. The McGlashan Addition can be found just to the west of the Burckhaulter District, above I behind Brickelltown. One story single family residences make up the majority of the structures in this historic district. The most common building material in these areas is wood, and Utilitarian architecture dominates. , Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 10-4 The Church Street historic neighborhood consists of one and two story residences, which were built primarily from wood products. It is no surprise that the most prominent historic building in this area is the United Methodist Church. The historic district that occurs along the River ' Street(s) includes a long list of one and two story structures that originally were used as residences. While a large percentage remain in residential use, many have been converted to ' commercial uses. The primary architectural building materials used h,:re are stucco and wood. Furthermore, the style of architecture is consistent with the other historic districts located outside of Commercial Row. As previously stated, the historical structures outside of Commercial Row are not as well maintained as the buildings on Commercial Row. While it is true that there are some fine examples of restored structures, such as the C.B. White House, there are also examples of neglected, dilapidated, and deteriorating historical buildings throughout the DSA. ' 5. Railroad Related Features For many people, the railroad is the very essence of what is historical to Downtown Truckee. The Town is famous for the Southern Pacific line that runs through the heart of the DSA. As part of the first transcontinental railroad, which was completed in the mid 19th century, the station in Truckee quickly became the most important hub of train service for the western United States. ' The old passenger depot building is still in use today for ticket sales and tourist information. The building has been functional for more than 100 years. Another railroad related structure that is stillv,in use is the freight depot which has been remodeled to allow commercial uses. These structures are located on property owned by Union Pacific located across Donner Pass Road from Commercial Row. 6. Cemetery For many communities, the cemetery can be a focal point of historical interest. Truckee is no different. Just being able to read names and dates associated with eras past can inspire a sense of historical significance. The cemetery is located in the extreme northeastern portion of the DSA, ' in the Burckhaulter District between Hwy. 267 and I-80, accessed off of Jibboom Street. The site has been used as a graveyard for more than 100 years, has several hundred headstones, but is not yet at capacity. B. Evaluation Guidelines ' Impacts to archaeological, ethnic, or historic resources will be evaluated based upon the potential for loss, disruption, or other adverse effect on said resources. Basically, any impact which has the potential to eliminate an important example ofTruckee's (or California's) history will be ' considered to be a significant impact. Determinations of what constitutes an adverse effect on archaeological resources, or an important example of history, will often require consultation of a qualified professional archaeologist or historian. Impacts to cultural, archaeological, and/or historic resources will be evaluated based upon the criteria contained in appendix "K" of the Downtown Truckee Specific flan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 10-5 CEQA guidelines. 1 C. Impacts_ Much of the DSA has not been surveyed with respect to archaeological resources. The entire , study area should therefore be considered sensitive in terms of the potential presence of both prehistoric and historic resources. Unrecorded archaeological sites could be exposed during construction activities, especially in areas near water resources and historical areas of activity. Determination of the significance of prehistoric and historic resources within the DSA must be evaluated using the criteria set forth in Appendix K of the CEQA guidelines. Furthermore, potentially significant historic sites can also be evaluated using the criteria to determine the eligibility of resources to be included in the National Register of Historic Places. There will almost certainly be significant impacts to archaeological and historic resources that occur as a result of increased development in the DSA, unless the mitigation measures listed below are implemented. , resources could be adversely affected b Historic eso y y destruction to make way for new development. The potential relocation of a small number (1 or 2) of structures may be necessary to create room for the Jibboom Street parking and retail development. Other structures in the DSA could also be affected by development that occurs near them. These factors could constitute a significant impact, depending upon the historic value of the structure(s), condition of the structure(s), the new location(s) for them (if it is determined that relocation is a viable option), and the extent that they would be affected by development proposed by the Specific Plan. Potential destruction of historic structures is considered a significant impact. Policies have been ' included in the Specific Plan to regulate removal of historic structures. Historic character may also be adversely affected by incompatible new development. The Specific Plan contains historic design requirements which will mitigate impacts created by incompatible new development. D. Miti ati n Measpres The following mitigation measures will reduce impacts to cultural resources to a less than significant level: Chapter 8 - All policies in all sections. i� Downtown Truckee .Specific Alan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 10-6 1 1 Chapter 11 PUBLIC SERVICES AND INFRASTRUCTURE 1 A. Setting 1 r 1. Wastewater Collection and Treatment Wastewater collection and treatment services for the DSA, and the Truckee area in general, are provided by the Tahoe Truckee Sanitation Agency (TTSA) and the Truckee Sanitary District (TSD). The TTSA is a regional entity created in the 1970's to transport, treat, and dispose of wastewater in the North Tahoe -Truckee area. In Truckee, the TTSA operates and maintains a sewer collection trunkline which parallels the Truckee River and delivers wastewater to a tertiary -level wastewater treatment facility located on the south side of this river approximately one mile east of the DSA. Treated wastewater is discharged into subsurface leach fields where additional pollutants are removed as the wastewater percolates through the sail to Martis Creek and the Truckee River. The facility can treat and dispose of 7.4 million gallons per day (7 day average flow). The district is governed by an independent board of directors composed of representatives from the TSD, North Tahoe Public Utility District, Squaw Valley County Water District, Tahoe City Public Utility District, and the Alpine Springs County Water District. The TSD is responsible for collecting wastewater in the Truckee area and transporting the wastewater to TTSA facilities. The district was formed in 1906 to collect and treat wastewater within the community of Truckee. The district provided wastewater treatment services until the TTSA facility became operational in 1978. The district eventually expanded to serve new development outside of Downtown including the Gateway area (1957), the Donner Lake area (1962), the Tahoe Donner subdivision, and the Glenshire area. The district now encompasses approximately 38 square miles serving 7,400 residential dwelling units and 415 commercial connections. The district is governed by an independent five -member board of directors, which is elected at large. Sewer mains presently serve most developed property in the DSA and the server mains are sufficient in size to accommodate future development in these areas. Vacant parcels on the fringe areas (i.e., Old Mill Site) may require extensions and 1 or expansion of sewer mains for the district to provide service. The district has identified the following forthcoming projects in the Downtown area to improve the district's wastewater collection capabilities. These projects are anticipated to be funded within the next two years. Commercial Row Mainline Extension - This project will replace an old mainline that currently services Commercial Row. A ten -inch diameter pipeline at the intersection of Spring Street and Commercial Row will be extended approximately 800 feet to the intersection of Commercial Row and Hwy. 267. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Drafi Emuronmental ltnpact Report 11-I East River Street Overhead Crossing Replacement - This project will replace ' approximately 400 feet of ten -inch diameter pipeline where it crosses the Truckee River at the east end of East River Street. The current structure was designed and built in 1927 and does not meet current seismic code requirements. The project will require a 375 -foot long overhead crossing of the Truckee River with a central main span of approximately 100 feet. The pipeline will be increased to 12 inches in diameter to allow for future ' development of the Old Mill Site. Provisions for a one -lane emergency vehicle bridge are being considered by the district. The Town is considering working with the district to the use the crossing as a bicycle 1 pedestrian crossing to and from the Truckee Regional Park. The 1990 maximum day demand for the service area is approximately 350 g.p.m., and the combination of the three well sources is adequate to meet the current demands of the service area. At buildout of the service area under existing zoning uses and densities, the projected maximum day demand is approximately 1,184 g.p.m. The North -Side Well is sufficient in , capacity to meet this projected demand, and the removal of the Airport Well and Sanders Well from the North -Side Service Area distribution system will not adversely affect water supply for the service area. (Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Deport 11-2 I 2. Water Supply pP Y The Truckee Donner Public Utility District (TDPUD) is the water service provider for the DSA, and the Town in general. The district's water system is composed of three components - source, storage, and distribution - with the district divided into seven service areas. Nearly all of the Downtown Study Area is located in the North -Side Service Area (the extreme western end of ' West River Street in the DSA is located in the Gateway Service Area). In addition to the DSA, the North -Side Service Area includes the Tahoe -Truckee Airport area, Olympic Heights, Ponderosa Fairway Estates, and Martis Valley Estates. The present sources of water for the North -Side Service Area are the Airport Well, the North - Side Well, and the Sanders Well. These wells provide water to several service areas, and 1 destination service areas for these wells will change with future development in the Town. The Airport Well (2,500 g.p.m.) primarily serves the Gateway and Tahoe Donner service areas, but the water must go through the North -Side Service Area for distribution to these areas. The North - Side Service Area presently utilizes surplus water from this well in excess of the present demand of the Gateway and Tahoe Donner service areas. Upon buildout of the Tahoe Donner Subdivision, the North -Side Service Area will not be able to utilize water from the Airport Well. The Sanders Well (300 g.p.m.) was developed as part of the Tahoe Donner supply system, but now provides water to the North -Side Service Area. Like the Airport Well, the North -Side Service Area will not be able to utilize water from the Sanders Well upon buildout of the Tahoe Donner Subdivision. The North -Side Well (2,500 g.p.m.) is the primary source of water for the North -Side Service Area. The well was developed to serve both the North -Side Service Area and the Tahoe Donner Service Area. The 1990 maximum day demand for the service area is approximately 350 g.p.m., and the combination of the three well sources is adequate to meet the current demands of the service area. At buildout of the service area under existing zoning uses and densities, the projected maximum day demand is approximately 1,184 g.p.m. The North -Side Well is sufficient in , capacity to meet this projected demand, and the removal of the Airport Well and Sanders Well from the North -Side Service Area distribution system will not adversely affect water supply for the service area. (Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Deport 11-2 I IThe Airport Tank and the North -Side Tank store water for the North -Side Service Area. The Airport Tank is a prestressed concrete tank constructed in 1981 with a storage capacity of approximately 600,000 gallons. The tank was developed as part of the Tahoe Donner water supply system, and water from the Airport Tank must be pumped into the North -Side Tank before delivery into the North -Side Service Area distribution system. The North -Side Tank is a welded steel tank constructed in 1971 with a storage capacity of 400,000 gallons. The tank stores water for the DSA and Olympic Heights distribution systems and to receive water from the North -Side Well for distribution to Tahoe Donner. An existing 100,000 gallon bolted steel tank constructed in 1971 is located on the south side of the Truckee River near Tonini Springs but is not presently in use because of previous contamination of the spring. The 1990 storage requirements (daily storage, fire storage, emergency storage, and flow-through storage) for the North -Side Service Area were approximately 600,000 gallons. The TDPUD does not consider the Airport Tank as storage for the North -Side Service Area because water must be pumped from the Airport Tank to the North -Side Tank. Consequently, the service area has a present storage deficit of at least 200,000 gallons. Storage requirements upon buildout will increase to 1,300,000 gallons resulting in a buildout deficit of 900,000 gallons. The TDPUD ' concludes that additional storage is necessary for the service area. This storage is considered to be a priority because of the existing storage deficit. As part of their Master Plan, the TDPUD has identified two potential sites for water storage tanks to serve the projected demands of the service ' area. These are the Tonini Tank site, and a site located near the intersection of Shaneva Road and Euer Valley Road (referred to as Trout Creek Tank). It is anticipated that 300,000 gallons of ' storage is needed at the Trout Creek Tank with the remaining 600,000 gallons to be developed at the Tonini Tank site. 1 ' Based on structure floor area, type of construction, exposure to adjacent structures, and presence of fire sprinkling systems, the Truckee Fire Protection District estimates that a minimum fire flow of 2,500 gprn is necessary for the DSA. The existing distribution system has adequate pressure to deliver this fire flow. However, as stated before, the service area is deficient in water storage. This significantly impacts the ability of the system to deliver the minimum fire flow for extended periods. Approximately 300,000 gallons of water is required to sustain a minimum fire flow of 2,500 gpm for a 2 -hour period. The North -Side Tank has adequate capacity to provide fire flow for this duration, but water delivery to users in the service area may be adversely affected. The District has identified the following major facility improvements to serve buildout demand of the service area: New transmission pipelines to replace or supersede existing pipelines. - Trout Creek Storage Tank with a capacity of 300,000 gallons to be located near intersection of Shaneva Road and Euer Valley Road. ' - 14" transmission main from Trout Creek Tank to Jibboom Street. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 11-3 - Tonini storage tank(s) with a capacity of 610,000 gallons to be located at foot of Bald Mountain. 3. Drainage The natural terrain of the DSA provides a number of drainage courses which eventually, through man made or natural means, are directed into the Truckee River or Trout Creek. The majority of these drainages do not include water treatment facilities (i.e., grease and oil traps 1 separators, infiltration) prior to discharge into the Truckee waterways. Trout Creek is the major drainage course for the watershed generated from the Tahoe Donner subdivision and other smaller drainage courses within the DSA. Trout Creek also empties into the Truckee River at the easternmost end of the DSA. A stormwater drainage plan has not been fully developed or implemented for the DSA. The existing drainage systems (or lack of same) are discussed by subarea in the paragraphs that , follow. The subareas that are referenced here are the same as those described at the beginning of chapter 5. The commercial core area drainage system of inlets lining Donner Pass Road, which, are meant to , collect surface water runoff from within the area, utilize culverts to direct water into the Truckee River or Trout Creek. The system is intended to accommodate all drainage generated from Donner Pass Road (subarea # 1 ) and north of Donner Pass Road to Interstate 80 (subarea #2). Resurfacing of Donner Pass Road, deterioration of the roadway, and the lack of defined drainage courses along residential streets has caused runoff to be directed onto Donner Pass Road below grade and f or away from the existing drainage inlets. Areas prone to standing water exist along Donner Pass Road, Jibboom Street, and West. River Street segments and intersections due to the inadequacy and deterioration of the current drainage system. Additionally, accumulation of sediment and debris has caused partial blockage of the existing drainage inlets and culverts, resulting in decreased system capacity. The most severe problem areas are along Jibboom Street on both sides of the street and at the northwest intersection of Hwy. 267 and West River Street. Jibboom Street flooding is due to the ' low elevation of the area. Water must be pumped out of the area. ' Subareas #3 and #4 (West River Street industrial subarea and Truckee River corridor, respectively) are located on either side of the Truckee River in the westernmost portion of the DSA. Most of the industrial parcels in this area do not utilize a centralized runoff treatment facility. The more recently approved industrial uses employ grease and oil traps 1 separators, while the older uses drain stormwater runoff directly to the Truckee River. There is a drainage culvert, which runs along West River Street, that drains into the Truckee River as it leaves the subarea. Drainage from the Truckee River corridor subarea on the south side of the river is allowed to flow directly over or through the ground, and into the river. 1 Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 11-4 1 J The River Street residential area (subarea #5) and the Hilltop area (subarea #6) also drain directly into the Truckee River. As a result, there is the potential for trace amounts of toxic substances to be washed into the river. (This statement holds true for other untreated drainages, as well.) The remaining subareas of the DSA are 47 (lumber yard I old mill site 1 East River Street Lindustrial area) and #8 (cemetery 1 Hwy.267 north). Both of these areas drain directly into Trout Creek which, in turn, flows into the Truckee River just outside the DSA eastern boundary. ' Subarea 47 is between subarea #8 and the river, so drainage from the cemetery 1 Hwy. 267 flows through the old mill site. The majority of drainage from these subareas, therefore, flows directly into the Truckee River by way of Trout Creek. Chapter 6, Section g of the Downtown Specific Plan Volume 2 summarizes the results of a focussed drainage study for the DSA. Existing drainage deficiencies and the improvements necessary to correct these deficiencies are identified in this Section of the Specific Plan, and are herby icorporated by reference. 4. Police Protection Police protection is provided under contract with the Town by the Nevada County Sheriff's Department. Currently the Town is evaluating the service level and effectiveness and considering different options, including the creation of a separate police Department for the Town,,..- Parking restrictions are enforced through a full-time parking enforcement officer. 5. Fire Protection The Truckee Fire Protection District is an independent fire protection agency with a board elected from the district. The district provides fire suppression and emergency response to the rural and suburban areas in, and surrounding the incorporated Town of Truckee. District facilities in the DSA include Station No. 91 which is located on the south side of Donner Pass Road across from Commercial Row. This site has been utilized as a fire station for more than 100 years. The present building was constructed in the 1940's with several additions in subsequent years. The station serves as the administrative headquarters for the district and t includes the chief officers' offices, public access 1 public relations, and data processing. It is, however, an unstaffed fire station with volunteers providing staff support during emergency calls. It encompasses approximately 4,600 square feet of Boor area with 2,300 square feet for apparatus, 1,000 square feet for offices, and 1,300 square feet for fire prevention functions. Vehicular equipment includes a 1984 Type I Pumper and two squad vehicles. The District's only fully -staffed station is Station No. 92 which is staffed 24 hours per day with professional firefighters. It is located on Donner Pass Road between Highway 89 and Northwoods Boulevard approximately %a mile west of the DSA and is the nearest station to Downtown Truckee except for Station No. 91. Water storage for fire protection purposes is discussed in the "Water" section of this report. The TDPUD has identified a water storage deficiency for the Central Truckee service area and plants to add water storage to address these deficiencies. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 11-5 There is a need to add fire hydrants in the DSA to decrease distances to structures from hydrants and improve fire flow. The TDPUD has plans to install fire hydrants along the new water mains which will be installed Downtown. Also, requirements for new development generally include the installation of fire hydrants for the new structures. The location AStation No. 91 along Donner Pass Road and near the Donner Pass Road f Hwy. ' 267 intersection is a major limitation for the provision of fire protection services to Downtown properties south of the railroad tracks and the Martis Valley and Airport area. Due to traffic congestion at peak periods and railroad traffic at Donner Pass Road and Highway 267, timely responses by the Station are often difficult. The District has preliminary plans to relocate this station to the Hwy. 267 / Truckee Airport area to improve responses to properties south of the railroad. There are no plans at this time with regard to the fate of the existing station facility. 6. Snow Storage f Removal I All of the roadways in the DSA, with the exception of State Hwy. 267, are part of the Town - maintained road system. These streets are plowed as needed during winter months in order to keep the roads accessible to vehicular traffic. The commercial core area occasionally requires that snow be hauled away, once the storage areas become full to capacity. Snow is stored on the south side of Donner Pass Road along the entire length of Commercial Row. Furthermore, , additional snow can be stored at each end of Commercial Row near the alley and Post Office on Bridge Street, and between the intersection of dibboom Street and the alley and Donner Pass Road on Spring Street. As the DSA develops snow will have to be trucked out, especially during heavy snowfall events, 7. Schools , The DSA is currently served by the.Tahoe Truckee Unified School District. B. Evaluation Guidelines Potential impacts to public services are evaluated against the following criteria to determine potentially significant impacts% Increases in storm water runoff or drainage which exceed current system capacities, increases in sewage generation or sewer system problems that result from exceeding existing capacities, impacts that create the need for increased or expanded water services, fire or police protection services, and school capacity. ' C. Impacts Various public service agencies were contacted in order to determine the extent of the potential impacts relative to their particular area of concern or expertise. For instance, the Tahoe -Truckee Unified School District's response to the Notice of Preparation {NOP} for this DEIR identified ' the mitigation fees required to be paid by developers of new residential units in order for the district to provide the increased services that would be necessary to accommodate the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 11-6 additional development and associated population growth. Similarly, agencies which handle sewage disposal, solid waste disposal, water service, and power were all contacted. These special districts have clearly stated that they would be both willing and capable of providing the increased service to the DSA that would be necessary, should the Specific Plan be adopted and implemented. Each infrastructure system is discussed below with regard to the need for increased capacity (where necessary) to serve additional development. All of the special districts and other service 1 providers have made it clear that they can either: accommodate the proposed growth with their existing infrastructure and service I support system, or, expand their service capacity - often by way of development impact fee imposition - in order to accommodate the development proposed by the Specific Plan. Therefore, while many of these impacts to public services and infrastructure would be potentially significant, they can easily be mitigated to levels of insignificance by the mitigation measures set forth below, Energy - Additional development accommodated by the General Plan will result in increased energy consumption (natural gas and electricity). According to the Truckee Donner Public Utility ■' District (PUD), the additional energy that will be necessary to accommodate this increased need will be available. However, appropriate mitigation measures to reduce this demand are included below. Water- The PUD also provides water service to the DSA. This agency indicated that most of the water"nfrastructure that would be required to serve the development proposed by the Specific Plan is already in place. Any new water lines that become necessary will be provided by measures such as development impact fees. Furthermore, the TDPUD has indicated that the kinds of land uses proposed by the plan would not cause significant adverse impacts on the existing infrastructure. Sewer - The Truckee Sanitary District (TSD) provides sewer service for the DSA, as well as most of the greater Truckee area. The District is divided into nine primary service areas; the downtown area is in the "Central Truckee" service area_ Virtually 100% of the existing parcels within the DSA are served by the TSD. The District has plans to increase wastewater connections as the urban area expands. This service increase is expected to mitigate impacts relating to sewer service to less than significant levels. Solid Waste Disposal - This service is provided by the Eastern Regional Landfill, which is located on Highway 89 South, approximately 2 miles south of the westernmost portion of the study area. This facility acts as a transfer station only, however, as all of the incoming solid waste is transported to a facility known as Lockwood Landfill, in the State of Nevada. According to Paul Achiro, a representative of the Eastern Regional Landfill, Lockwood has sufficient capacity to accept all incoming waste, including that which originates in California, for the next 100 years. As a result, increased solid waste production resulting from Specific Plan idevelopment will not be a significant impact. IDowntown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 11-7 Snow Storage I Removal - Increased development, particularly the infill variety, has the potential to reduce the amount of space available for snow storage. Impacts of this variety would be significant, particularly during periods of excessive snowfall. In order to mitigate urban snow management impacts, the Specific Plan sets forth a snow removal program. Fire Protection - Increased fire protection is a necessary component of all new development. A local fire protection district usually provides their own standard conditions of approval for new development projects. These requirements typically include such items as the extension of adequate fire flow devices (fire hydrant locations), minimum driveway and street width 1 turning radius requirements, snow staking, and vegetation clearing near structures, among others. Potential impacts to the Truckee -Donner Fire Protection District's (TDFPD) ability to respond to emergencies will be mitigated by the District's requirements for these improvements, as well as development standards standards currently in place. Police Protection - The town may need to increase its capacity to protect the public through the Drainage - The Specific Plan calls for improvements to the majority of the roads in the DSA. Drainage improvements are incorporated as part of the Downtown Specific Plan improvements ' proposals. Impacts to existing drainage infrastructure that result from increased development called for in the Specific Plan could be significant, because of increased drainage amounts running off from larger areas of impervious surface coverage. As a result, the mitigation measures listed below that alleviate these potential drainage problems will be required to be implemented to reduce impacts to a less than significant level. Snow Storage I Removal - Increased development, particularly the infill variety, has the potential to reduce the amount of space available for snow storage. Impacts of this variety would be significant, particularly during periods of excessive snowfall. In order to mitigate urban snow management impacts, the Specific Plan sets forth a snow removal program. Fire Protection - Increased fire protection is a necessary component of all new development. A local fire protection district usually provides their own standard conditions of approval for new development projects. These requirements typically include such items as the extension of adequate fire flow devices (fire hydrant locations), minimum driveway and street width 1 turning radius requirements, snow staking, and vegetation clearing near structures, among others. Potential impacts to the Truckee -Donner Fire Protection District's (TDFPD) ability to respond to emergencies will be mitigated by the District's requirements for these improvements, as well as development standards standards currently in place. Police Protection - The town may need to increase its capacity to protect the public through the use of peace officers as a result of Specific Plan development. Currently, the Town contracts with the Nevada County Sherrif's department for police protection. Options available to the Town include: (a) no increase in the amount of peace officers on duty at any one time; (b) increasing ' the scope of the existing contract with the Sherrif's department to include more officers and/or more area patrolled, or; (c) create the Town's own police department. The level of service desirable in the DSA will be determined by the Town Council, and the staffing determined accordingly. "Mutual Schools - The Tahoe -Truckee Unified School District adopted its Benefit School Impact Fee Agreement" in September of 1990, in order to generate additional funds needed to house students. This agreement, between the developer and the District, states that the developer agrees to pay an increased square footage fee to offset or mitigate any associated impacts of his/her residential development project. The District's 1995-1996 Fiscal Year Impact Fee is $2,83 per square foot of assessable space. According to Denise Gaddis, a TTUSD planning analyst, no developer fees are collected by the district until the building permits have been applied for. Impacts to the school district will be significant (up to 150 students could be directly attributable to Specific Plan buildout), but mitigable to non-significant levels through the collection of the impact fees discussed here. Parks and Recreation - Based on data regarding the use of the existing (Truckee Donner Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 11-8 1 1 Recreation and Park District) facilities, both from the Recreation and Park District Staff and outside users, it appears that most District facilities are at capacity or are experiencing overcrowding at this time. Impact fees are currently in place to address the impacts. In addition, the Specific Plan sets forth a number of new parks proposals which would help serve the community's recreation demands. D. Mitigation Measures Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 1I-9 t .r. The following Specific Plan policies will mitigate potential impacts on Public Services to a less than significant level: 1 Snow Storage and Removal - All policies in Specific Plan Chapter 6, Section 6B Law Enforcement - All policies in Specific Plan Chapter 6, Section 6D Fire Protection - All policies in Specific Plan Chapter 6, Section 6E Sewer, Power, & Water - All policies in Specific Plan Chapter 6, Section 6F Drainage - All policies in Specific Plan Chapter 6, Section 6G Parks & Recreation New park proposals identified in Chapter 9 Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 1I-9 t .r. Chapter 12 - NATURAL HAZARDS f SAFETY HAZARDS A. ettin 1. Fire Given the historical fire -prone nature of Truckee (both in Town and in the surrounding forested landscape), it is generally understood that fire is one of the greatest threats to the environment. The Truckee Fire Protection District was established in the late 19th century to help combat this chronic problem. In recent years, the actual occurrence of structure fires has been significantly reduced, largely due to the modernization of methods, equipment, and general safety practices associated with fire prevention. 2. Earthquake Seismic events in the northern Sierra Nevada are relatively rare, although there are documented instances of earthquake activity in the greater Truckee area. There are no known fault lines that occur within the DSA, although a number of small fault "traces" have been identified within the Town boundaries. These fault areas have been studied by the State of California (Department of Mines and Geology and the State Board of Reclamation). The actual danger, both to the health and safety of the ' general population and property damage associated with seismic activity is believed to be quite low. J i 3. Avalanche Avalanche areas are marked on zoning maps as Potential Snow Avalanche Areas - red (PSAA - red) which denotes high avalanche hazard, or (PSAA - blue) which denotes moderate avalanche hazard. There are presently none of these PSAA zones within the DSA. There are, however, certain areas of steep slope located on the south side of the Truckee River, as it flows parallel to West River Street, where it is evident that avalanche activity has occurred, and will likely continue. 4. Flood The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has identified areas subject to flooding in the event of a 100 -year flood. In the DSA, these areas exist along the banks of the Truckee River, and to a lesser extent, along Trout Creek. The flood danger within the DSA boundaries was experienced in the January 1997 flood, when a number of riverfront properties were damaged or threatened. In many locations the flood waters rose substantially above the limits of the mapped 100 year flood plain. Portions of nearly all properties adjacent to the Truckee River are within the mapped 100 year floodplain. B. Evaluation Guidelines Any impacts that are associated with exposure of people or property to increased risk from flooding, fire hazards, avalanches, or earthquakes are considered potentially significant. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 12-1 Q. IM124CIS Geologic hazards in the DSA consist of earthquake and landslides, The Boca l Truckee and Dog Valley Faults are located near the Town, and a number of small fault traces have been identified within the Town boundaries. None of these faults have been designated as an Alquist-Priolo Special Study Zone, which is a designation used by the State of California to identify significant hazards along faults. The identified faults, along with the potential for damage from earthquakes in the Truckee area, have been studied by the State. The State Division of Mines and Geology has conducted general geologic studies of the region, while the State Board of Reclamation, which operates dams in the area, has studied faults in the region in more detail. The conclusions of these studies are that the potential for strong ground shaking from faults in the area is not ■ considered great, and that the potential for damage is also not high. The potential for seiche (flooding in areas surrounding rivers as a result of earthshaking) was also studied and found to be minimal. The existing Town of Truckee Building Code requirements for seismic safety are considered sufficient to prevent earthquake damage. No portions of the DSA are constrained due to earthquake hazards. Unreinforced masonry construction is common in the historic commercial row area. Retrofit of these structures has not been given a high priority in Truckee due to the relatively low earthquake hazard in the area. Landslide hazards can result from -weak soils on steep slopes, and from earthshaking. Landslide hazards have not been studied for any part of Nevada County, including downtown Truckee; it is therefore not possible to identify precise areas subject to landslide hazards. The information available concerning potential earthshaking indicates that landslides on gentle slopes, or liquefaction (soil movement on flat lands due to earthshaking and weak soils), represent minimal hazards. In order to avoid the potential for impacts in this area, zoning standards in Volume III of the Specific Plan require clustering of development away from areas of steeper slopes. Adverse impacts could occur from flooding g alon Trout Creek and the Truckee River. There are areas along these waterways that have been designated by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) as subject to flooding in the event of a 100 -year flood. These areas are generally not considered appropriate for residential land uses. For development proposals in areas subject to flooding in the event of a 104 -year flood, more detailed study of flood hazards will be required as a part of'development design and approval. In addition, since construction within the 100 -year flood plain can have an effect on the size of the flood plain (blocking flood waters in one area can cause them to spread further in another area), new construction in the ' flood plain should be limited unless it can be shown that it will not increase flood hazards in other areas. Current Lahontan RWQCB prohibitions on development within the 100 year floodplain will mitigate potential hazards to new development. I As stated above, risks associated with earthquake activity are minimal, they are not considered significant. Increased risk of fire that would result from Specific Plan development is not likely, 1 and is also considered to be insignificant. Like flood hazards, any potential fire hazards that might result from development in the DSA would be mitigable by development guidelines ,Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 12-2 1 1 designed specifically for fire safety. D. MitigatiMMOsUM Impacts relating to safety hazards and natural hazards are potentially significant, but mitigable to less than significant levels by these measures. In addition to the mitigation measures listed above, all Town of Truckee General Plan Safety Policies under Safety Goal #2 (2.1 through 2.11) have been incorporated by reference into this document. This mitigation program is meant to reduce impacts related to the range of safety concerns to levels of insignificance, Fire Impacts - Specific Plan Chapter b, all policies under Section 6.E. Avalanche Impacts - Specific Plan Chapter 7, Section 7F, policy 2. Flood Impacts - Specific Plan Chapter b, Section +6G, policies 1 through 4 Soil Instabiliy - DSA Zoning Ordinance, Section 11.05.02 ( DFD standards requiring clustering of development away from areas of steep slopes) Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Deport 12-3 F IChapter 13 - CEQA ASSESSMENTS ,& PROJECT ALTERNATIVES A. Cumulative Impacts Cumulative impacts of the proposed Specific Plan are tied closely to the growth and development that is accommodated by the Town of Truckee General Plan. By its very nature, the environmental analysis contained in this DEIR is cumulative, since it looks at environmental impacts associated with projected 20 year buildout of the Downtown Specific Plan. Cumulative impact analysis for the Downtown Specific Plan is tiered off the Truckee General Pian EIR, which is hereby incorporated by reference . B. Unavoidable Significant Impacts 1 Significant and Unavoidable impacts will occur related to traffic and air quality. Due to the severity of existing traffic problems, proposed roadway improvements may not be capable of mitigating further (LDS) impacts to less than significant levels until the Highway 267 Bypass is constructed. The intersections of Bridge Street and Commercial Row will continue to experience LOS F conditions until through traffic is diverted to the Highway 267 Bypass. Similarly, because air quality in Truckee has exceeded State and Federal Standards for particulate matter, it may not be possible to mitigate impacts to air quality to a less than significant level prior to adoption and implementation of the Air Quality Management Plan for Truckee. The Town of Truckee General Plan also identifies impacts in the areas of traffic and air quality as both unavoidable and significant. It was determined that these impacts could not be mitigated to less than significant levels, primarily because of existing traffic and air quality conditions. The Town Council will need to make a "statement of overriding considerations" for the identified traffic and air quality impacts in order to adopt the Downtown Specific Plan. C. Growth lndudne Impacts The adoption and implementation of the Downtown Specific Plan will accommodate significant growth and development, as described in the Land Use Impacts Chapter (Chapter 5). The Specific Plan establishes land uses and infrastructure improvement requirements based upon policy direction contained in the Town of Truckee General Plan. The Specific Plan provides for_ growth projected over a 20 -year time frame, but does not provide excess development capacity inconsistent with the Town of Truckee General Plan. The development potential accommodated by the Specific Plan is based upon the General Plan's policies directing infill development to the DSA. While encouraging growth, the Specific Plan implements detailed programs to mitigate potential environmental impacts and maintain the historic mountain character of the area. D. Project Alternatives This section discusses the possible alternatives to the proposed Specific Plan, as well as their respective potential adverse environmental impacts. CEQA requires that alternatives be selected based on their ability to mitigate potentially unmitigable environmental impacts. Because the significant urunitigable traffic and air quality impacts are based on existing impacted conditions, none of the identified alternatives will reduce these impacts to a less than significant level. i These alternatives are listed and described below. Alternative # 1: Preferred Project Alternative Alternative #2: No Project Alternative Alternative #3: Reduced Growth Alternative I Description of AIternatives & Probable Environmental Impacts The preferred project alternative (#1) is described in Volume II of the Specific Plan (the Vision Plan), and in the project description contained in this document. This alternative was developed to meet the needs of the community for residential, commercial, and industrial development while providing environmental protection to the DSA. This alternative provides for substantial expansion of residential, commercial, and mixed use development wihtin the DSA during the next 20 years. The preferred plan relates infrastructure needs specifically to development and establishes policy direction to create programs to finance necessary upgrades to infrastructure and public services, which reduces the fiscal impact of development on the Town and the general public. The environmental effects of the preferred alternative are reduced by the implementation ' of a program of specific mitigation measures. The "No Project" alternative (42) would maintain the existing zoning within the DSA. This alternative would maintain zoning which is inconsistent with the Town of Truckee General Plan, adopted in February 1996. Adoption of the Downtown Specific Plan is intended to address long standing problems with land uses and environmental problems in the DSA, therefore the no project alternative would preclude implementation of important Specific Plan policies which re intended to mitigate long standing environmental problems. The amount of industrial development accommodated in the DSA would be substantially higher under this alternative, since existing industrially zoned areas would remain unchanged. The amount of infill residential and commercial uses would be reduced under this alternative, due to the maintenance of large areas of industrial zoning. Significant and unmitgable environmental impacts would remain with this alternative, and all other environmental impacts identified in this EIR would be unmitigated due to the lacy of environmental protection policies put in place by the proposed Downtown I Specific Plan. The "Reduced Growth" alternative would reduce the development potential of the DSA by 'I2. This alternative would result in a smaller amount of projected growth being accommodated in the DSA, primarily in the Mill Site and Hilltop master plan areas. Under this alternative the Specific PIan policies to address long standing environmental and land use problems would be adopted, but the Town of Truckee General Plan direction to accommodate infill growth would not be implemented to the fullest extent possible. Potential environmental impacts under this alternative may be reduced slightly, however the significant and unmitigable impacts would remain. Downtown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 16-2 u I APPENDIX A TRUCKEE DOWNTOWN CIRCULATION STUDY t t 1 TRucKEE DowwowN CIRCULATION ,STUDY Prepared for The Town of Truckee 11570 Donner Pass Road Truckee, California 96161 91+61582-7700 Prepared by Leigh, Scott & Cleary, Inc. 2690 Lake Forest Road Post Office Box 5875 Tahoe City, California 9+6145 9161583-4433 LSC # 9670160 July 19, 1996 TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter Number Page , Number 1 Introduction............................................................... 1 2 Existing Transportation Conditions .. .......................................... 4 3 Development of Downtown Transportation Model ... . ............................ 2.1 4 Land. Use Projections/Traffic Generation and Distribution ......................... 26 5 Alternatives Analysis....................................................... 31 NoBuild............................................................... 31 Alternative 1 - Programmed Roadway Improvements ...... , ... , ...... 31 Alternative 2 - Eastern Underpass (West Alignment) ........................... 33 Alternative 3 - Eastern Underpass (West Alignment) and Eastern River Crossing (West Alignment).......................,................................,. 37 Alternative 4 - Eastern Underpass gest Alignment) and Western River Crossing ... 39 Alternative 5 - Eastern Underpass (East) and East River Street Connection to State Route 267 Bypass ................................................ 42 Alternative 6 - Eastern Underpass (West Alignment) and Glenshire Connection to State Route 267 Bypass ................................................ 44 Alternative 7 - Eastern Underpass (East Alignment) and Eastern River Crossing (East Alignment)...................................................... 46 Alternative 8 -Programmed Roadway improvements and Reduced Mill Site Development......................................................... 48 6 Parking Analysis........................................................... 60 7 BicyclelPedestrian Circulation ................................................ 70 List of Tables Table Page Number Description Number 1 Downtown Study Area Street Inventory ........................................ 4 2 Level Of Service Summary (1) ................................................ 12 2 Level Of Service Summary (2) ................................................ 13 2 Level Of Service Summary (3) ................................................ 14 3 Intersection Accident Rates .................................................. 18 4 Truckee Downtown Screenline Analysis - Calibration - Screenline #2 ................ 25 5 Town of Truckee Land Use Totals ............................................. 26 b Trip Generation............................................................ 28 7 Functionality of Roadway Alternatives ......................................... 35 8 Downtown Truckee Parking Inventory ......................................... 61 g Downtown Truckee Average Parking Occupancy Rate ............................ 62 10 Downtown Truckee Peak Parking Occupancy .................................... 63 Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv LSC, Inc. - Page 1 w J I List of Figures f] Truckee Downrown Circulation Siudv LSC, Inc. IPage ii Figure Number Description Page plumber I 2 Project Area Location Map ................................................... Existing Intersection Lane Configuration and intersection Control .................. 2 5 3 Existing Summer P.M. Peak -Hour Traffic ....................................... 9 4 Downtown Study Area Peak -Month Average Daily Traffic ......................... 10 5 Level Of Service Calculations for Existing roadway ,Network... l I 6 Typical Peak -Hour Queues Resulting From Rail Activity ................ 16 7 Downtown Study Area Traffic Analysis Zones ................................... 23 8 9 Truckee Downtown Screenline Map........... Trip Generation Existing, 2015, and General Plan ................................ 24 28 10 Year 2015 Origins and Destinations of Mill Site Traffic ........................... 29 11 12 Year 2015 Origins and Destinations of Truckee River Crossing Traffic ............... Planning Year Level Of Service No Build ....................................... 30 32 13 Planning Year Level Of Service Alternative I ................................... 34 14 15 Planning Year Level of Service Alternative 2 .................................... Planning Year Level Of Service Alternative 3 .......................... . ........ 36 38 16 Planning Year Level Of Service Alternative 4 ................................... 40 1 17 18 Planning Year Level Of Service Alternative 5 ................................... Planning Year Level Of Service Alternative 6 ................................... 43 45 19 Planning Year Level Of Service Alternative 7 ................................... 47 20 'Planning Year Level Of Service Alternative 8 ................................... 49 21 Eastern Underpass Alignment Alternatives ...................................... 51 22 Year 2015 Origins and Destinations of Southern Pacific RR At -Grade Crossing Traffic . 52 23 Existing Parking Supply and Demand .......................................... 65 24 Year 2015 Parking Supply and Demand ..... .... 66 25 Existing and Proposed Pedestrian Facilities .............................. 71 26 Proposed Bikeway Corridors ................................................. 74 f] Truckee Downrown Circulation Siudv LSC, Inc. IPage ii 1 1 t fl Chapter I Introduction The Town of Truckee is currently completing a Downtown Study Area Specific Plan to guide the improvement of the historic downtown area This plan includes many elements that will have impacts on transportation facilities in the downtown area. Most important, the plan calls for a substantial aniouni of additional growth in the downtown area. A summary of growth projections is provided in Chapter 4 of this document. The planned level of downtown development will increase traffic levels substantially over existing conditions. In addition, a number of roadway modifications, such as the State Route 267 bypass, western railroad underpass, Tahoe - Donner Connection and intersection improvements at the Bridge SlreetlDonner Pass Road/State Route 267 intersection have been proposed that will affect future transportation system operating conditions in the downtown study area. The purpose of this study is to document existing conditions of the downtown Truckee transportation network, and present roadway circulation alternatives for consideration in the transportation planning process. This information will then be used as a baseline for evaluating the impacts of the proposed specific plan on transportation conditions within the downtown study area Figure 1 presents the project area location map, as well as the downtown study area roadway network, and intersections which are evaluated in this circulation study. Without a comprehensive planning process, the downtown area has suffered from a number of ongoing transportation deficiencies. Even without the impacts of the proposed Specific Plan development, the area has significant traffic congestion problems, particularly during peak summer and winter visitor periods. Inadequate parking supply has been a longstanding problem for the Commercial Row area_ Atypical intersection control and capacity deficiencies have been a problem at the Bridge Street/Donner Pass Road/State. Route 267 intersection for a number of years. Operation of the Southern Pacific Railroad has caused traffic delay and queuing problems in the downtown area since automobiles were first introduced to Truckee. The following information is intended to quantify these and other operating characteristics of the Truckee transportation network, as well as provide transportation alternatives for consideration in mitigating existing and projected roadway deficiencies. Key issues which are assessed within the downtown study area include: Existing and planning year intersection geometries and traffic volumes, ■ Existing and planning year intersection operating conditions, ► Existing and projected parking supply and demand, ► Existing transit service, ► Historical accident in.fot7nation, ► Existing and planning year impact of train activity on the downtown transportation network, ► Existing pedestrian and bicycle circulation patterns, ► Calibration of existing traffic conditions and preparation of traffic projections using the Truckee ' Transportation Model, Review of existing approved developments and roadway projects within the downtown study area influence. In order to obtain public input on the Truckee Downtown Circulation study, the Truckee Downtown Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC} was presented with the various transportation network improvement alternatives developed in this circulation study. ' The purpose of the circulation study is to quantify future transportation demands within the downtown study 1 Truckee Downtown circulation Srudv fSC,nc_ 1 Page 1 V i Truckee Downwwn Circulation SP. dy JO F�PCSUbd LL .V 1 c c i0 1 N � C 0 C U 4 LLJ � V u �f F '1 U t7 C=1 r+5 L.SC, Inc. Page 2 N r �r sa 2B us sn Nevada aa sig sa 3 California 0 ¢ry � 1 5H to r r sap ss' SS V Q CL Truckee Downwwn Circulation SP. dy JO F�PCSUbd LL .V 1 c c i0 1 N � C 0 C U 4 LLJ � V u �f F '1 U t7 C=1 r+5 L.SC, Inc. Page 2 1 area and to evaluate transportation network improvement alternatives capable of providing efficient mobility to and through the downtown area into the foreseeable future. This circulation study is designed to provide existing and future year traffic projections and anticipated roadway and intersection operations. It should be emphasized that the purpose of the traffic analysis is to present information regarding traffic operations in the downtown area for various transportation network alternatives. It is then the responsibility of the CAC and town staff to weigh the advantages and disadvantages of each alternative for traffic operations, as well as other considerations such as neighborhood impacts, effect on existing land use, visual impacts, and community development policy, to determine the future year roadway network most suitable to the downtown area. This network will then be identified as the preferred roadway alternative for planning purposes in the downtown study area. 1� rl t Truckee Downtown Circulation Addy LSC. Inc. I Page 3 Chapter 2 Existing Transportation Conditions Existing Transportation Facilities All existing streets and Highways in the downtown area (wi.h the exception of Interstate 80) are two-lane roadways of varying width, depending on functional classification and usage. Table 1 presents each of the streets in the downtown study area along with its width and functional classif cation. Intersection control and intersection lane configurations were inventoried through field surveys performed by LSC, Inc. during February of 1996. Figure 2 presents intersection lane configurations and intersection control for each of the thirteen intersections studied in the existing conditions analysis. The following discussion of roadways in the downtown area highlights important characteristics of each roadway and how it fits into the overall downtown Truckee traffic circulation network. TABLE 1: Downtown Study Area Street Inventory Functional Pavement et dame Classification Width(l) State Route 267 arterial 43 feet Donner Pass Road arteriai 25 feet Bridge Street collector 40 feet West River Street (east) collector 22 feet West River Street (west) arterial 20 feet East River Street collector 23 feet Perkins Street local 25 feet Smith Street local 25 feet Church Street local 24 feet Palisades Drive collector 24 feet South River Street local 20 feet East South River Street local 22 feet Jihboom Street collector 22 feet Keiser Avenue local 20 feet Glenshire Drive collector 24 feet E Street local 21 feet D Street local 16 feet Spring Street collector 28 feet High Street collector 22 feet Riverside Drive local 18 feet School Street collector 21 feet Note 1: Minimum road width. 1 Source: Town of Truckee dns7+n 1 Commercial Row is defined for purposes of this study as the section of Donner Pass Road located between High Street and Bridge Street in downtown Truckee. Commercial Row is a portion of the main east -west local transportation link through downtown Truckee. This street carries both regional and local traffic through the core of the downtown area. Commercial Row serves regional lraffic by connecting interstate 90 and Donner Pass Road to State Route 267 south of the downtown area. It also provides a vital link to local circulation by connecting Donner Pass Road west of Spring Street and the Gateway Center of Truckee to the historic downtown area. T-Xkte pownrown Cir=larton Sludv t t t i 11 1 L 3C. Inc. Piga 4 ' LSC. Inc. Page 5 �p C r a /^ 1 r N f C r r7 { m f 'F o t'r 11 •d F J T Cn � i � � � t• •:m capaa�od � .a ti N w ry `I N 0 W u N O O Ct Truckee Downtown C rCuiarion Studv LSC. Inc. Page 5 67 C r a /^ f C r r7 { m o F J T Cn � i � � � t• •:m capaa�od � .a N M1 ry `I N LSC. Inc. Page 5 67 C a /^ f C r m tf7 Cn � W Ct L,T 3. 6D "V5 x r a m LSC. Inc. Page 5 During peak traffic demand periods, traffic along Commercial Row experiences delay due to a number of factors. Atypical (3 -way Shap) intersection control and insufficient intersection capacity at the Commercial Row/Bridge Street/State Route 267 intersection causes traffic to queue along Commercial Row. Parking maneuvers associated with on -street parking on both the north and south sides of Commercial Row contribute to congestion and confusion in the area. Passage of trains through the downtown area causes vehicle queues along Commercial Row from Bridge Street to the west of Spring Street, Bridge Street, for purposes of this study, is defined as beginning at the West River Street intersection and continuing north through the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection to the Interstate 80 grade separation north of the downtown area. The section of Bridge Street between West River Street and Commercial Row is also designated as State Route 267. Bridge Street provides the only access across the Truckee River and Southern Pacific Railroad Tracks in the downtown area. The nearest other crossing of the railroad tracks is via State Route $9, located approximately 2.5 miles to the west of Bridge Street. As with Commercial Row, Bridge Street serves regional traffic by connecting Interstate 90 and Commercial Row to land uses to the south of Truckee. Bridge Street provides a vital link in the local circulation network by connecting the Donner Pass Road, Gateway Center, and historic downtown areas to residential areas south of the Truckee River. During weekend and holiday peak traffic demand periods, traffic along Bridge Street queues from the Bridge Street/Commercial Row/Donner Pass Read intersection to the south in excess of two utiles. This situation typically occurs on Sunday afternoons when regional recreational .traffic. leaving the Truckee and Lake Tahoe area (in addition to local traffic) is forced to funnel through Bridge Street and downtown Truckee to access Interstate 80. During typical weekday peak demand periods, this type of queuing does not occur on Bridge Street, However, during time periods when trains cross Bridge Street via the at -grade crossing, vehicles can queue to the south of the State•Route 267/Palisades Drive intersection. The effect of railroad activity is more fully addresses) in the Railroad Merger Traffic Impact Analysis prepared by LSC, Inc. for the Town of Truckee in March, 1996. Donner Pass Road forms a portion of the Donner Pass Road/Commercial Row/State Route 267 east -west transportation link through downtown Truckee. For purposes of this study, Donner Pass Road is defined as beginning at the intersection with High Street in downtown Truckee and continuing west to the Gateway Center area. This street carries both regional and local traffic to the core of the downtown area. Donner Pass Road serves regional traffic by connecting Interstate 80 to Commercial Row and State Route 267. It also provides a vital link for local circulation by connecting the Gateway Center area of Truckee to the historic downtown area. During peak traffic demand periods, traffic along Donner Pass Road experiences delay due to a number of factors. Parking maneuvers associated with on -street parking on tooth the north and south sides of Donner Pass Road contribute to congestion and confusion in the area.. Vehicles turning left from eastbound Donner Pass Road onto northbound Spring Street cause vehicles to queue along Donner Pass Road, as the left turning vehicle blocks the eastbound approach to the intersection. Passage of trains through the downtown area causes vehicle queues along Commercial Row that extend out onto Donner Pass Road to the west of the Spring Street intersection. State Route 2+67 provides regional access to and from Truckee and the historic downtown area. This roadway connects the Martis Valley and Lake Tahoe areas to downtown Truckee and Interstate 80. To the south, State Route 267 originates at State Route 28 on the North Shore of Lake Tahoe in Kings Beach. From there, State Route 267 continues north, over Brockway Summit, through the Martis Valley and into downtown Trucker. Within the downtown area, State Route 267 is referred to as Bridge Street between the intersections of East River Street and Commercial Row. At the intersection with Commercial Row, State Route 267 continues east to the State Route 267/State Route 89 North interchange with Interstate 80, where it terminates. Truckee Downrown Circulation Snav LSC. Inc. Page 6 i u n n 1 77 1 As noted previously, traffic along Bridge Street/State Route 267 during weekend and holiday peak traffic demand periods, queues from the Commercial RowBridge Street/State Route 267 intersection to the south along State Route 267 in excess of two miles, due to regional recreational traffic (in addition to local traffic) leaving the Truckee and Lake Tahoe area This level of queuing does not occur on State Route 267 during typical weekday peak demand periods. However, during time periods when trains cross Bridge Street via the at -grade crossing, vehicles can queue to the south of the State Route 267/Palisades Drive intersection. ' Glenshire Drive provides access between the historic downtown area and the Glenshire District of Truckee. Glenshire Drive intersects State Route 267 approximately 1/2 mile south of the. State Route 267/Interstate 80 interchange. The Glenshire Drive/State Route 267 intersection is a t -type intersection, with traffic from Glenshire ' Drive controlled by a Stop sign. Traffic signalization has been considered for this intersection in the past; however, steep grades on the State Route 267 approaches to this intersection have precluded signalization due to safety concerns regarding traffic stopping on the steep grades. Traffic congestion along Glenshire Drive is limited to the area near the intersection with State Route 267. Westbound Glenshire Drive drivers wishing to turn north or south on State Route 267 are forced to yield to through tragic on State Route 267. This in turn causes vehicular delay on the Glenshire Drive approach to this intersection. , Jibboom Street provides local access to residential districts in the historic downtown area, as well as providing a diversion route around congestion at the Conirnercial Row/Bridge Street/State Route 267 intersection. Existing congestion and delay on Jibboom Street traffic are minimal. Delays do occur mainly at the Stop controlled intersections at Spring Street, Bridge Street, and Keiser Avenue. The narr6w width of Jibboom Street litnits vehicular capacity and travel speeds. This limits the diversion around the Commercial Row/Bridge Street/State Route 267 intersection to mainly peak demand periods, or when trains block the Bridge Street railroad crossing. During these periods, delay at the Commercial Row/Bridge Street/ -State Route 267 intersection causes the Jibboom Street diversion route to become more travel time competitive. West River Street provides east -west access between State Route 89 on the west side of Truckee and State Route 267 in the downtown area. West River Street provides access to a number of industrial, commercial, and residential land uses located along the Truckee River between the Southern Pacific Railroad tracks and the Truckee River. West River Street also carries regional traffic to and from the Truckee downtown area and State Route 89 south of its intersection with West River Street. West River Street lies parallel to, and south of, the Southern Pacific Railroad right-of-way. It provides a potential diversion route around the Bridge Street at -grade raillhighway crossing for northbound State Route 267 traffic bound for the Donner Pass RoadIState Route 89 area. This diversion route is most viable during off-peak traffic- demand rafficdemand periods when trains are crossing at Bridge Street. During peak traffic demand periods, this diversion route becomes Iess viable, because vehicle queues form that block access to and from West River Street. Existing delay on West River Street is concentrated at the intersections with Bridge Street/State Route 267/East River Street, and with State Route 89. Heavy traffic on the Bridge Street approaches to the Bridge Street/West River Street/State Route 267 intersection severely impedes traffic on West River Street from making a left-hand turn onto Bridge Street_ Delays of up to three minutes have been recorded for this movement during peak demand periods. Compounding this problem is the passage of trains through the downtown area that cause queuing on Bridge Street, blocking access to West River Street and creating gridlock Queues on West River Street approach 1,000 feet in length during peak demand periods when the railroad gates are down at the Bridge Street crossing. Truckee Downtown Circulariort Srudv LSC, Inc. I Page 7 Spring Street provides local access to residential areas in the downtown area. This street also connects Jibboom Street to Donner Pass Road/Commercial Row in the center of the downtown area, forming a critical link in the aforementioned Jibboom Street diversion route. Spring Street also forms the dividing line between the Commercial Row area and the Brickeltown area of downtown Truckee. Existing Traffic Volumes To determine existing traffic flow rates within the downtown study area, LSC, Inc. and Town of Truckee staff performed turning movement counts at each of the downtown study Area intersections on February 7 and February 14, 1996. Hourly and average daily traffic counts at the Bridge Street railroad crossing conducted by Caltrans in January, April, and July of 1994 were also obtained. Hourly and average daily traffic volumes obtained from the Caltrans count on Bridge Street between Commercial Row and West River Street, were evaluated to determine any variation in traffic volumes between summer and winter months. This evaluation indicates that daily traffic volumes in the summer months are approximately 30 percent higher than in winter months. On a peak -hour basis, summer peak -hour traffic volumes were found to be approximately 12 percent higher than winter peak -hour volumes. A shift in north -south traffic demand was also observed at the Bridge Street railroad crossing between winter and summer months. Daring the winter, more traffic is traveling northbound at the Bridge Street railroad crossing than southbound. During summer months, the northbound traffic volume remains relatively constant when compared to northbound winter traffic demand at this location. The southbound traffic volume at this location, however, increases nearly 40 percent over winter volumes, resulting in a shift of the peak demand direction. This shift is most likely due to increased weekday recreational traffic that occurs during the summer months. To account for increased traffic volume and shifts in travel patterns that occur during summer months, the winter Peak -hour counts were adjusted to reflect typical summer weekday P.M. peak -hour tauning movements and travel patterns. Average daily traffic volumes for each of the study roadways were also determined. Figure 3 presents existing summer weekday P.M. peak -hour turning movement counts for the downtown study area, while Figure 4 presents existing average daily traffic volumes for area roadways. Existing Level of Service To evaluate existing roadway operating conditions, the Level Of Service (LOS) concept was used. LOS is a quantitative measure of traffic conditions on isolated sections of roadway and intersections. Appendix A provides a more detailed description of the LOS criteria used for this study. LOS ranges from "A" (with no congestion) to "F" (where the system fails with gridlock or stop -and -go conditions prevailing). Intersection LOS calculations were conducted using the "Highway Capacity Software" package, based upon the procedures presented in the Transion Re, i&j :S and Spccial RepQrt 2Q2. lighwayapacity Manual. Third Edition. Copies of detailed LOS calculations are contained in Appendix B of this report. The Town of Truckee has adopted LOS "D" as a formal minimum Level Of Service standard for roadways outside of the downtown study area and LOS "E" within the downtown study area. Results of the LOS analysis are presented in Figure 5 and Table 2. As shown, the intersections of Commercial Row/Bridge Street/State Route 267, and State Route 267/Palisades Drive currently operate at LOS "F," which is in violation of the town's adopted Level Of Service standard. Level Of Service °"F" operations occur at both of the aforemm ioned intersections due to extensive delays of side street traffic attempting to enter the mainline traffic stream. The intersection of Commercial Row/Bridge Street/State Route 267 is especially problematic due to the atypical Truekee Downrown Circulation Saidv LSC. Int, Page 8 n 1� 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i t 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 '10 M44�qad M1 Truckee Downtown Circulation 5n�dv LSC, Inc. Page 9 ry —1 n LI) 7 U C jy C- U V" LJ Id E— �. 0 L] U7 ' .. 64 us � Y A Z r 1 A L � 1 N a Truckee Downtown Circulation 5n�dv LSC, Inc. Page 9 U z 1.1 1 Truckee Downtown Circulation Stuav LSC, Inc. Page 10 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 a 2 Truckee Downtown Circulation Saufv LSC. Inc. Page II z r" V 4d E— E--' C U V) ' U o 0 E_ 0' >�� 0 > L � U1 i Ln N CT 0 O O � CL O 7 lal J � p J a 2 Truckee Downtown Circulation Saufv LSC. Inc. Page II z r" V 4d E— E--' C U V) ' U TABLE 2: Level Of Service Summary (I of 3) Intersection Intersection Number Intersection Belay LOS (seconds)(1) 1 Donner Pass Road/Interstate 80 WB On/Off Ramps 0.6 A Westbound left turn 16.4 C Westbound right turn 4.9 A Northbound left turn 4.2 A 2 Donner Pass Road/Interstate 80 EB OfrIHigh Street 0.8 A Eastbound left tura 14.8 C Eastbound right tum 5.8 B Westbound right turn 5.0 A Southbound left tum 3.9 A 3 Spring Street/Donner Pass Road 15 A Southbound left turn 7.0 B Southbound right turn 7.0 B Eastbound left turn 3.9 A 4 Commercial Row/Bridge StreetlSR 267 454.2 F Eastbound left turn 41.5 E Eastbound right turn 4.5 A Westbound left turn x999.9 F Westbound right turn 13.9 C Northbound left turn. 3.3 A Southbound left turn 3.3 A 5 Bridge Street/Jibboom Street 4.5 A Eastbound right turn 5.7 B Westbound through 6.3 B Northbound left tum 2.3 A Southbound left tum 2.2 A Note: The intersection delay of>999.9 is greater than 999.9 seconds. Source; LSC Truckee Downtown Circulation 1 1 1 LSC. Inc - Page 12 1 I MI (Light Manufacturing and Industrial District) The "MI" District is designated to provide areas for diverse industrial development that can be established in close proximity to commercial and residential development. M I districts within the DSA are located along East and West River streets, in some cases adjacent to the Truckee River. OP (Office and Professional) The "OP" District is intended to provide areas for the development of professional and administrative offices and related uses and structures. It is designed to promote groups of offices in locations indicated in the General Plan Office and Professional land use category. It is also consistent with the Neighborhood Conunercial and Regional Commercial land use categories. Standards will insure compatibility with Residential and related land uses as well. There are seven parcels in the study area with this zone designation. :�. P (Public) The "P" District is intended to provide Toning for areas occupied by Federal, State, and Local government uses including nonprofit hospitals, recreational parks, cemeteries, solid and liquid waste disposal facilities and associated uses, as well as land associated with public facilities and services. The designated public parcels within the study area include the depot site on Donner Pass Road, the cemetery, and the veteran's hall, among others. FR (Forest Recreation) t:} The "FR" District -.is intended to provide zoning for Forest areas with recreational usage. There is one "FR" zoned,parcel within the study area. It is located at the west boundary of the DSA, along the south bank of the Truckee River. OS (Open Space) The "OS" District is provided to establish zoning for open space lands and lands reserved to preserve and protect scenic vistas, viewsheds, and biological resources from urban sprawl. OverlayDesignations The following designations may be combined with the base designations to provide additional land use direction. DT (Downtown) The purpose of the "DT" Combining District regulations is to recognize and preserve the character of the historic Downtown area by preventing large areas of nonconformities which could be created by implementation of more recently established zoning and site development standards. IHP (Historic Preservation) IDowntown Truckee Specific Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 5-3 {�I I1 u P, t The purpose of the "HP" Combining District is to identify and highlight areas of the Town having natural or manmade features which are of cultural, archaeological or educational value. The "HP" District recognizes areas which are important to local, state, and national history, and is intended to Provide for the identification, preservation, and enhancement of the diverse and harmonious elements which reflect an area's or individual site's history. This district is intended to protect such historic structures and sites by requiring all new uses and alterations to existing uses to be designed with consideration for preserving and protecting the historic resource and to recommend complimentary and contemporary design and construction through the use of comprehensive design guidelines. D (Design) The purpose of the "D" Combining District regulations is to provide controls and safeguards to preserve and enhance areas of historical, civic, or cultural value. SP (Site Plan) It is the purpose of the "SP" Combining District to provide further refinements. of the types of uses allowed, as well as site development standards that. areapplicable to properties within this district. 3. Existing Design Guidelines Town of Truckee Design Guidelines - residents, businesspeople, and property owners in the Town of Truckee are concerned about preserving and enhancing both the built and natural environments of the area. Because the economy of the Town is substantially dependant on tourism, the atmosphere and aesthetic features of the community have direct economic value. Therefore, the community attempts to protect these values through the use of architectural styles and building materials that are consistent and compatible with the history, climate, and appearance of the area. When the Town of Truckee incorporated on March 23, 1993, it adopted the County of Nevada, Land Use Code, including the Design Guidelines for Eastern Nevada County. In October of that same year, administrative revisions were made to these Design Guidelines to demonstrate that the Town is responsible for their implementation. The objective of these guidelines is to make developers aware of the design elements that will be considered in the review of project applications and/or proposals. I Historic Preservation District Design Guidelines - The purpose of the Historic Preservation District Design Guidelines, which were originally adopted by Nevada County in 1983, is to protect areas having cultural features which are of archaeological, historical, and/or educational value. By requiring that all new uses and alterations to existing uses be designed with a consideration for preserving and protecting the older structures within the historic district, it is Downtown Truckee Speck Plan - Draft Environmental Impact Report 5_4 a J t e r_ TABLE 2: Level Of Service Summary (2 of 3) Intersection Intersection Number Intersection Delay LOS (seconds) 6 State Route 267/Church Street 0.9 A Eastbound through traffic 9.1 B Westbound through traffic 7.0 B Northbound left tum 3.1 A Northbound left nun 3.3 A 7 State Route 267/Keiser 1..6 A Eastbound left tum 13.3 C Eastbound right tum 13.3 C Northbound left turn 3.3 A 8 State Route 2671Glenshire Road 6.9 B Westbound left turn 48.7 F Westhound right turn 4.5 A Southbound left turn 4.4 A 9 State Route 267/Interstate 80 EB On/Off Ramps 2.1 A Eastbound left turn 10.4 C Eastbound right tum 4.3 A Southbound left tum 3.1 A 10 State Route 267/Interstate 80 WB On/Off Ramps 2.3 A Westbound left tum 10.8 C Westbound right nun 3.7 A Northbound left turn 2.8 A 11 Bridge Street/West River Street 34.6 E Eastbound left tum 463.7 F Eastbound right turn 8.9 B Westbound through traffic 28.8 D Westbound right rum 5.2 B Northbound left turn 6.1 B Southbound left turn 4.0 A Mote; The intersection delay of >999.9 is greater than 999.9 seconds. Source: LSC Trochee Downtown Circulation 5tudv LSC. l nc_ Page 13 TABLE 2: Level Of Service Summary (3 of 3) Intersection Number Intersection intersection, Delay (seconds) LOS 12 State Route 267/Palisades 162.0 F Eastbound left turn X999.9 F Eastbound right turn 6.0 B Northbound left turn 6.0 B 13 State Route 89/West River Street 7.2 B Westbound left turn 95.1 F Westbound right turn 16.0 C Southbound left turn 8.2 B Note: The intersection delay of >999.9 is greater than 999.9 seconds. Source, LSC three-way Stop intersection control at this location. Stop signs are located on the Donner Pass Road -approaches and the southbound Bridge Street approach to the intersection. The northbound Bridge Street approach is uncontrolled to prevent vehicles from being trapped in a queue that would extend from the Bridge Street intersection south onto the railroad tracks if Stop control was present The atypical three-way Stop is necessary to reduce the risk of rail/auto collisions. However, this results in reduced intersection capacity, as a result of confusion among motorists regarding assignment of right-of-way. The intersection of Bridge Street/West Raver Street currently operates at LDS "E", with eastbound left turning movements operating at LOS ' F". Minor street left turn movements at the intersections of Glenshire Drive/State Route 267, and West River Street/State Route 89 operate at LOS 7' under existing conditions. Again, this is due to excessive delay experienced by the Glenshire Drive and West River Street approaches as traffic attempts to enter the mainline traffic stream on State Routes 267 and 89. All other intersections evaluated in the downtown study area operate at acceptable levels of service for all movements. Existing Transit Services and Ridership There are currently five transit services that serve the Truckee community: The Truckee Trolley service -is provided by Frontier Tours, Inc., under contract with the Town of Truckee. The Truckee Trolley provides service from the Interstate 80/State Route 267 interchange, through Commercial Row to Donner Memorial State Park. Alternate runs during the summer provide service to the west end of Donner Lake. Between late June and Labor Day weekend, the Truckee Trolley operates on hourly headways, with 12 round -trips per day, seven days a week between 7.30 A.M. and 7:34 P.M. In addition, the Truckee Trolley operates during the winter on weekends and holidays from mid-December through mid-March. ane -way fare for the Truckee Trolley during the summer is $1.00, with a discounted faze for disabled patrons, seniors, and children between the ages of five and 15. The winter service is currently operated free of charge to the passengers. The Trolley provided 6,439 passenger -trips during the 1995 summer season, with an average daily Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv LSC. Inc. _ Page 14 e 1 L� t ridership of 92 patrons. Daily ridership ranged from a low of 40 on July 23 to a high of 270 on July 4. During the 1995/1996 winter season, 1,261 passenger -trips were provided. Daily ridership ranged from a low of 12 on December 23 to a high of 76 on February 11. + TheNorthstarlState Route 267 Shuttle, operated by the Ndorthstar Sha Resort, provides service from 7:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. on one-hour headways. Service is provided between the Truckee Intermodal Center and the Northstar Resort. The NorthstarlState Route 267 Shuttle operates from late June through Labor Day weekend. A total of 2,650 passenger -trips were provided on the Northsstar service during its 73 -day 1995 summer operating season. Ridership ranged from a low of seven on the first and fourth days of operation to a high of 107 on July 30. The NorLhstarlState Route 267 Shuttle averaged 36.3 ' passengers per day over this time period. Tahoe Area Regional Transit (TART), with partial funding from the Town of Truckee, provides bus ' service between Truckee and Tahoe City seven days a week, 365 days a year. "The Sus" starts at the Truckee Intermodal Center in downtown Truckee, travels westward on Donner Pass Road through the Gateway area, with stops at Tahoe Forest Hospital, Mountain Hardware, and Deerfield Plaza. The route ' then follows Stag Route 89 southward, with service to Squaw Valley and the Resort at Squaw Creek. Returning to State Route 89, the route continues southward to the Tahoe City 'Wye" area, where convenient transfers can be made to and from the north shore and west shore service provided by TART. "The Bus" operates on roughly two-hour headways, and one-way fare is $1.25. • The Town of Truckee provides a demand -response transit service for elderly and disabled residents through a contract with Frontier Tours, Inc. Cane -way fare is $1.00 for trips less than five miles from the Senior Center and $2.00 for trips more than five miles from the Senior Center. The service operates _3, from 6:00 A -M. until approximately 5:00 P.M., Monday through Friday. A cab coupon program i- provides demand -response service on the weekend. Taxi vouchers are sold for $1.00 by High Sierra Senior Citizens, the Town of Truckee reimburses the taxi company $5,00 for each voucher. The Glenshire Route, operated as part of the demand -response service by Frontier Tours, Inc., provides ' service Monday through Friday from 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. on two-hour headways. Service is provided between the Truckee intermodal Center and Glenshire for $2.00. The Glenshire Route operates from late June through Labor Day weekend. A total of 822 passenger -trips were provided on the Glenshire Route during the 1995 summer season. The Glenshire Route averaged 12.4 passenger -trips per day, with a high of 36 passenger -trips on July 24 and a low of two passenger -trips on September 2. Existing Rail Activity Existing railroad activity in the downtown Truckee area was evaluated for the Town of Truckee Railroad Analysis,Merger TraffiC Impact (LSC inc., 1996). Based on information in this document, the following conclusions can be drawn regarding the impact of existing railroad activity on vehicular traffic flow in the downtown area. Existing train activity in the downtown Truckee area has a significant impact on traffic circulation. Traffic queues along State Route 267 caused solely by train crossings of Bridge Street extend to the south of the Palisades Drive/State Route 267 intersection during some time pctiods. Similarly, ttaffic queuing on Donner Pass Road extends from west of the intersection with Spring Street to the intersection with Church Street. Queues on West River Street can extend up to 1,000 feet west of its intersection with Bridge Street during maximum "gate down" scenarios. Figure 6 presents locations of vehicles that would be queued after an Truckee Db mown Cirru►ation Studv LSC. Inc. tPage 15 LO cu m oe Z u. cb ZZ :3 V L sp saposIIod . ,. cu Q! L.i Q I► G,i Truckee Downtown Circulation SauN LSC. Inc. Page 16 I average train crossing episode, requiring four minutes of "gate down" time, ' On average, 6.7 vehicle -hours of delay occur during an average train crossing during the F.M. peak -hour. Forty-six vehicle -hours of delay per day, or 14,000 vehicle -hours delay per year, are incurred by motorists in the downtown Truckee area as a result of freight and passenger trains crossing Bridge Street. Diversion potential around the State Route 267 at -grade railroad crossing is severely limited. West River ' Street provides the only potential diversion route for northbound State Route 267 traffic around train blockages that occur at the rail crossing. Due to the close proximity of the Bridge Strcet/West River Street intersection to the rail crossing on Bridge Street, access to West River Street becomes blocked by vehicles ' queuing along Bridge Street, effectively eliminating this diversion potential. As mitigation to the above rail related impacts and the proposed merger of the Southern Pacific and Union Pacific railroads, the Town of Truckee has entered into an agreement with the Union Pacific Railroad, which will result in construction of a railroad underpass to the west of the historic downtown district, Funding for the underpass and associated roadways will be shared by the Town and the Union Pacific Railroad. �. The non -typical three-way Stop traffic control at the Bridge Street/Donner Pass Road/State Route 267 intersection causes a great deal of confusion to motorists unfamiliar with the intersection- This reduces intersection capacity, and increases the potential for accidents. The three-way Stop control is driven by the close proximity of the railroad crossing to this intersection, which precludes Stop sign control on the northbound approach. Accident history, which was investigated in the area of the rail crossing, reveals that the atypical intersection control at the Bridge Street/Donner Pass Road/State Route 267 intersection appears to be causing right-of=-way violations that result in vehicular collisions. Also, some of the rear -end type accidents that occur in this area are L likely caused by queuing associated with train blockages at the State Route 267 railroad crossing. There were no reported vehicle/rail collisions from January 1985 to December 1995. 1 Existing Mode Split Existing mode split for travel within Truckee and the downtown area was calculated by determining the number of transit person -trips that occur on a typical summer day, and comparing this to the number of person -trips occurring via automobile on a typical summer day. This indicates that of motor vehicle oriented trips (automobile or public transit), 0.5 percent of person -trips occur on public transit, and the remaining 99.5 percent of person - trips occur via automobiles. This does not take into account bicycle or pedestrian trips. Accident History Accident data was obtained from the Truckee Division of the Nevada County Sheriff's Department for .July 1, 1992 through November 1, 1995. The accident information was reviewed to determine the total number of accidents that occurred at each of the downtown study area intersections. For the intersections of Bridge Street/Commercial Row, and Bridge Street/West River Street, eleven years of accident data, from January 1985 to December 1995, were obtained. Using this information, and average daily traffic (ADT) data, accident rates were determined in terms of accidents per million vehicles passing through each intersection. Table 3 presents intersection accident rates for each of the thirteen intersections evaluated. The intersection accident rates were then compared to average statewide accident rates compiled by the California Department of Transportation. All intersections in downtown Truckee are side street Stop controlled, with the Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv LSC. Inc. -- .Page 17 TABLE 3. Intersection Accident Rates Average Acndent Average Statewide Intersection 3 or 4 leg Number of Dally Rate Accident Rate Number Intersection Intersection Accidents Traffic acclmv acclmv. I Donner Pass Roadlinterstate 50 WB Ramps 4 4 13.504 0.00 0.34 2 Donner Pass RoacOnterstate 8CYFIigh Street 4 0 14.300 0.00 0.34 3 Spring Streel)Uonner Pass Road 3 0 14.600 0.00 4.22 4 Commercial Row/Bridge Street/SR 267 (1) 4 57 20,400 0.70 0.34 5 Bridge StreeWibboom Street 4 1 7,400 0.11 0.34 6 State Rouse 267/Church Street 4 2 14.000 0.16 0.34 7 State Route 267/Keiser Avenue 3 1 1.,100 0.07 0.22 8 State Route 2671Glen4hire Road 3 5 13,300 0.31 0.22 9 State Route 267/interstate 80 ES Ramps 4 3 10.200 9.24 0.34 10 State Route 267Anterstate 6C WE Ramps 4 7 9,000 0.64 0.34 11 Bridge StreeMest River Street (1) 4 37 22.100 0.42 0.34 12 State Route 2571PaRsades drive 3 12 20,150 0.49 0.22 13 State Route 89Mest River Street 3 0 17,700 9.00 0.22 Accident Data analyzed from .h.tly 1.1992 to November 1. 1495 except as noted. Note 1- Accident data anatyzed trom January 1, 1965 to December 31, 1995 for these intersections, Source- Nevada County Sheriffs Office, Truckee Division. dlac6d exception of the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection, which is three-way Stop controlled. Four -leg side street Stop contmlled intersections have an average stamwide accident rate of 4.34 accidents per mt lion vehicles. Three -leg or "'T" intersections with side street Stop control have an average statewide accident tate of 4.22 accidents per million vehicles. As shown in Table 3, the intersections of Bridge StreedCommercial Row, Bridge Street/West River Stzeet, State Route 257fGlensl&e Road, State Route 267/State route 89 northllnterstate 80 westbound ramps, and State Route 267/Palisades Drive, all have higher than average accident rates. The accident rate at the Bridge Street/ Commercial Row intersection (4.70 accidents per million vehicles) is more than twice the statewide average for side street Stop control intersections. This is likely due to the atypical three-way Stop intersection control causing confusion as to assignment of right -of --way. It should be pointed out, that although this rate is higher than the average rate for side street Stop controlled intersections, it is less than the average rate for both four-way Stop control intersections (0.78 and 0.75 accidents per million vehicles respectively). Although the five intersei:tions identified above do exceed statewide average intersection accident rates, none of them appears to exhibit an especially problematic safety hazard. None of the accidents that occurred resulted in loss of life, and only 17 percent resulted in injuries. Previous Plans and Studies A number of existing development and roadway improvement projects are currently planned or approved in or near the downtown Truckee area. Each of these projects will have an impact on traffic operating conditions in the downtown area. Following is a list of planned and approved projects which will have the greatest impact on downtown Truckee traffic conditions, and a description of how each will affect traffic flow in the downtown study area. State Route 267 Bypass - The California Department of Transportation, with support from :'Nevada County and the Town of Truckee, is proposing to construct a Route 257 bypass around the downtown Truckee area. As currently planned, the aligrunent of the bypass would begin with a grade separated interchange at Interstate 80, approximately 0.4 mile east of the existing Interstate 80/State Route 89/State Route 267 interchange. The aiigunent travels south, bridging over Glenshire Drive. the Southern Pacific Railroad tight -of -way, the Truckee River, and the Tahoe -Truckee Sanitation Agency emergency overflow sewer ponds. The allmment continues south and ties into existing State Route 267 Truckee Downtown Circulation5tudv LLSC. Inc. - - ..... Page IS ' at the Nevada/Placer County line. Construction of the State Route 267 bypass will provide an alternate route to and from Interstate 80 and State Route 267 to the south of the Southern Pacific Railroad and Truckee River. Currently, the only access across the Truckee River and Southern Pacific Railroad in the downtown area is via Bridge Street/State Route 267 in downtown Truckee. This forces all traffic bound for Interstate 80 and points ' north of the Truckee River and Southern Pacific Railroad to funnel through the downtown area. Construction of the proposed bypass will serve to relieve much of oris traffic congestion by eliminating regional traffic from the downtown area. 1� Third Tahoe -Donner Connection - The Town of Truckee long range planning process has identified a third connection to the Tahoe -Donner area to be a necessary component of the community's future circulation network Planned alignment for this connection includes a road that connects existing Northwoods Boulevard to existing State Route 89 north of the Interstate 80/State Route 267/S Late Route 89 interchange. From this roadway, an additional connection is proposed that would tie into existing Bridge Street to the north of the existing Bridge Street/Interstate, 80 grade separation, just north of the downtown study area. The impact of this roadway on the existing downtown circulation network will be evaluated in the alternatives analysis portion of this study. ■ Townof'Truckee Railroad Merger Traffic Impact Analysis - This study was prepared in March of 1996, by LSC, Inc. for the Town of Truckee. The study identifies impacts that would result from the proposed merger of the Southern Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads. Specifically, this study identifies a railroad underpass on the west side of downtown Truckee as a recommended mitigation of the planned increase in train aafic amass the existing at -grade crossing at Bridge Street The Town of Truckee has entered into an agreement with Union Pacific Railroad representatives to fund and construct this project in the 1996 to 1997 time frame. " ► Trade Signal Installation and Intersection Improvements at the Donner Pass Road and Bridge Street Intersection - This study was prepared in September of 1987 for Nevada County, prior to Town of Truckee incorporation. The purpose of the study was to identify if signalization was needed for this intersection, and if so, to estimate installation costs and construction phasing alternatives. This study indicates that traffic signalization is warranted for this intersection, and has been so since 1978, which is the earliest date that traffic turning movements were available for the intersection. The report recommends signalization and geometric improvements of the Bridge Street/Donner Pass Road intersection. Cost estimates for these improvements (in 1987) indicate that the intersection signalizadon alone would be approximately $266,000. The cost of reconfiguring the intersection geometry to add additional turn lanes on the northbound and southbound approaches would be an additional $346,000, for a total improvement cost of more than $600,000. Glenshire Area Traffic Study - This study was prepared by DKS Associates in December of 1992. The purpose of the study was to evaluate access to and from the Glenshire area of Truckee. The majority of traffic to and from the Glenshire area must pass through the State Route 267/Glenshire Drive intersection, which is within the downtown study area. Prior to incorporation of the Town of Truckee, Nevada County identified a need to signalize the intersection of State Route 267 and Glenshire Drive. Because of safety concerns related to the steep downgrade along State Route 267 from I-80 to Glenshire Drive, Caltrans has indicated that it would not allow signalization of this intersection. This study identified a treed to signalize this intersection to handle future traffic volumes, and evaluated four realignment and signaaation alternatives at the State Route 267/Glenshire Drive intersection. Truckee Downtown Circulation Srudv LSC. Inc. Page 19 Big Springs at Northstar - This is an approved residential development to be located in the ,vicinity of ' the Northstar Ski Area. The project will consist o€178 single-family recreational dwelling units. All access to and from the Big Springs development will be via the existing Northstar DrivelState Route 267 intersection. According to the Big ,S.prings at Northstar Draft Environmental Imnaet Report, this development will add an additional six northbound and 20 southbound vehicles to the downtown study area during summer weekday P.M. peak -hours. The "Lahontan" development ( formerly known as Gooseneck Ranch) - is an approved residential , development located approximately two miles southeast of the Town of Truckee and one mile west of State Roane 267. At full build out, 386 single family homes, 179 condominium units, an 18 -hole private golf course, and a recreation center with a swimming pool, tennis courts, and indoor fatness center are approved. Access to and from Lahontan would be via State Route 267 at the existing Martis Creek Drive f intersection and at the proposed Schaeffer Mill Road/State Route 267 intersection to be located south of Martis Creek Drive. This road will form the fourth leg of the existing intersection at Airport Drive. Construction of this project is projected to add 118 vehicles during weekday P.M. peak -hour time periods to the northbound Bridge Street approach of the already congested Commercial Row/Bridge StreedState Route 267 intersection. Similarly, an additional 214 vehicles are projected to be added to the southbound Bridge Street departure Ieg of this intersection, compounding existing traffic delay that occurs at this location. Martis Creels Estates - is a planned 57 unit residential subdivision with a 60 -room hotel to be located to the east of State Route 267 just north of the Northstar Drive/State Route 267 intersection in Placer County. 'ribs project is still in the environmental study phase of the development process. Primary access to and from the project would be via two access roadways onto State Route 267 in the vicinity of Northstar Drive. Construction of this project would add approximately 36 northbound and 42 southbound vehicles to the downtown study area via State Route 267 during the summer P.M. peak - hour. Truckee Downtown Circulation SnuN l.5C. Inc. Page 20 ' Chapter 3 Develo ment of Downtown Transportation Model Existing Town of Truckee Transportation Model The Town of Truckee recently contracted with Pacific Traffic and Transportation Engineers (PacTrans) to prepare a town -wide travel demand model using the TMODEL2 software. The purpose of this model is to provide a computerized simulation of peak -hour traffic flow in the Town of Truckee. The traffic simulation model can then be used to determine the effects of new roadway construction or changes in land use on both the existing and future transportation network in Truckee. This model contains both existing and general pian build out traffic volumes for highways and arterials in the Town of Truckee. The traffic model consists of a series of data sets that, when combined, represent travel characteristics on Town of Truckee roadways. Data sets that are included as a portion of the Truckee Transportation model include the following: Land use data - Existing land use within Truckee was divided into 63 individual transportation analysis zones (TAZs). Land use data for each analysis zone was then divided into one of 15 individual residential or employment land use categories. Trip generation rates - Trip generation rates for each land use type were developed. The trip generation rates are applied to the land use data to determine the number of vehicle -trips in and out of .�, each TAZ. This is referred to as the origin and destination table. s. .._ ► Link and node network - The link and node network represents roadways and intersections within the Town of Truckee. In general, only major roadways, such as State Route 257, State Route 89, Interstate 80, Donner Pass Road, etcetera, are represented in the traffic model. Each link (roadway segment) and node (intersection) is coded to reflect hourly capacity and travel speed, as well as other operating characteristics associated with the actual street network. r Trip table - This is a 63 x 63 matrix that represents the origins and destinations of vehicular traffic for each of the 63 TAZs. This information is then used to assign vehicles from each of the land use zones to the link and node network Basically, the computer model identifies where the traffic from each TAZ is destined for, and then assigns that traffic to the most logical travel route, as defined by the link and node network The above data sets interact in the following way to provide the computer simulation of travel patterns in the Town of Truckee: 1} Trip generation rates are applied to land use data to determine total number of origins and destinations for each TAZ, 2) The distribution of traffic among the TAZs is then determined, which provides the trip table. 3) The trip table is then assigned to the link and node network, with the simulation model determining the ' most attractive travel path between each of the TAZs, and then assigns the traffic between each of the respective TAZs to the most desirable travel path. This then provides simulated traffic patterns within the Town of Truckee. Truckee Downtown Circulation Saudv LSC. Inc_ Page 21 Downtown 'Truckee Transportation Model It was determined that applying the existing Truckee transportation model would be the most efficient manner to quantitatively assess impacts of future development and roadway improvements in the downtown study area. However, the existing Truckee transportation model does not provide adequate detail in the downtown study area for purposes of this analysis. To provide this needed detail, the Truckee transportation model has been refined to accxn-ately assess planned changes to the land use and circulation network in the downtown area. The following provides a description of the modifications that were made to accomplish this task. The Truckee Town model currently contains eleven transportation analysis zones within the downtown study area. The transportation analysis zones within the downtown study area were subdivided into 19 smaller zones to more accurately reflect land use and travel patterns in the downtown area. Figure 7 presents each of the downtown transportation analysis zones for the downtown traffic model. Existing and general plan land use quantities for each of the downtown transportation analysis zones were compiled and field checked by Town of Truckee plaruiin, staff. The link and node network in the downtown area was refined to include additional streets beyond those contained in the Town modeL The original model included only State Route 267, Bridge Street, Donner Pass Road, West River Street, Church Street, and libboom Street between Bridge Street and Donner Pass Road. For the downtown model, High Street, Spring Street, East River Street, Bridge Street north of ]ibboom Street, and Jibboom Street between Bridge Street and State Route 267 were added, After modifications were made to the link, node, and land use data, the model simulation for existing conditions was performed. Resulting link and turning movement volumes were compared to existing ground counts for the study area to determine how well the computer simulation model is calibrated to existing traffic volumes observed through field surveys. Model traffic volumes were compared to existing ground counts in the downtown study area, on a link by link basis, for all roadways included as part of the downtown study. In general, model calibrated link volumes were found to be within 15 per=t of ground count volumes in the downtown study area It is not uncommon for ground counts to vary from 10 to 15 percent from one day to tate next at a given location, With this in mind, it can be stated that the existing downtown traffic model replicates existing traffic conditions to a high level of accuracy for the downtown study area. In addition to performing a link -by -link review of traffic volumes within the downtown study area, a screenline was drawn around the downtown study area. The location of the screenline is presented in Figure S. All vehicular traffic crossing the screenline was tabulated for both existing ground counts and traffic model calibration traffic volumes. The total amount of traffic entering and exiting the screenline boundary was also tabulated for both ground count and modeled traffic volumes. Table 4 presents the results of the screenline analysis. As shown in Table 4, total traffic entering the screenline and total traffic exiting the screenline as reported in the model, is nearly identical to existing ground counts. This provides further assurance that the downtown transportation model is accurately reflecting existing travel behavior. After completing the link -by -link, and screenline analysis for the downtown study area, it was determined that the downtown model was calibrated to a sufficient level of detail so as to provide accurate results when used for developing alternative future year transportation network and land use scenarios, The next step in the analysis is to develop future year traffic projections by which to determine the demands that will be placed upon the transportation network The first step in that process is to develop projected land use for the desired analysis year. Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv LSC. Inc. _,_ Page 22 f agvd &Pms ummm--Olra -amommoa aq-J?U.L ti t 5.R. 69 n a '-. �rosar rws. srrrr ar-y I ■�r1 y�rrr• ; is � ► a1� s 7 a� � , ■ ■ 0.t ! 1• ■ r --% • a i ■ y�r ria s % • . +� �-Sy a ■ L tirr i i ■ ■ -;\.*ra * S t * r i �1R al a i •'►rte +`a�i ■ �� �rrr 1 ■ �r •►r yy � • � ■ +i 1 1'3 ■1 aS1ia • ■ m .a s Z �r� ` r• � i' i rr 11 R . �■ IL *� 7 0 0 ail a � rr L re `u •+ .}' �' ■ i• Q G � �i ■ t r ■ + ■ r r r • f r r � e r iLrr■ ■ �•4■ ■ • r� POrn6C■f '.Jf, Z 0 a G „�� cn C1 n ' rjMwwr'':�w ► VVV +�R s • y 1■ 1wr~ � go(�:■ `;l, ■ In i■ Vi .a +'r• � i�rr , ■ .. SI ■ a w � rw � ■ 1 f ,f " ■ r R y � i s ■� Lj/ ■ 7 Z 0 a G „�� cn C1 n ' rjMwwr'':�w ► a s • y 1wr~ � go(�:■ `;l, : ; .� , ■ .. SI ■ a w � rw � ■ 1 f ,f " ■ r R y � i s ■� Lj/ ■ 7 .�� ■wwww � rw■�. 1■ �rrrw i= go(�:■ `;l, : ; .� , ■ .. SI �•+trr *.+!' 11 rrw.rrir��H R ■ 0 u t 1 1 t t Truckee Downtown Circularion Snu v L5C. Inc. ^ - Page 24 t t t J t 0 t �j r-^ Truckee Downtawn Circulation 5rudv LSA', Inc_ IPage 25 r- w z C 7-9 Q] ao \ vin o o ap U L9 . c) ` J T C, C- LC3 T� V '0 `11 t V U) E LO 0) co *q cc op O in p } 0 P. <D t.f) * c } C%j ro P- CN C m CV c?) cc v m l� Com- cr ri L N Cj 4 0)i C�1 Ln o u] 0 a[�I-}� N N O co d CL x L C? to Lo C) C4 1,00 ttN Cr)m �tt� C7 U DRi O ;Q a Q C U O -0 -OD a) W Zf!] z (0 0 t o 9-6 U @ cc CV W Q cu 0in � U @ Q L m `ts [!} ❑ C r` tp @CIA >04 _ C itCO3 El w a > O m @ Q a: N m T ai a L3: z Truckee Downtawn Circulation 5rudv LSA', Inc_ IPage 25 Chapter 4 Land Use Pr9jeetions/Traffie Generation and Distribution Town of Truckee planning and community development staff developed year 2015 and general plan build out land use projections for the downtown area, as well as for the Town of Truckee as a whole. All year 2015 land, nse projections were based upon the Tmckee Economic andQ,Mo an Jf--S. udy prepared by S.R. Hoffman associates in 1995. General Plan land use data was developed rased upon economic and demographic projections contained in the Town of Truckee General Plan. For the long range transportation planning process, year 2015 was chosen as the detailed planning analysis year. General Plan build out land use data was also analyzed. Table 5 presents the land use totals for existing, year 2015 and general plan land use scenarios. TABLE 5: Town of Truckee Land Use Totals Land Use "totals Analysis Year Within Downtown Outside of Downtown Total Residential Employment Residential Employment Residential Employment (# units) (#employees) (# units) (#employees) (# units) (#employees) Existing 482 1,116 8,557 4,109 9,039 5,225 Year 1,495 2,428 11,776 5,681 13,271 8,109 2015 General 1,772 3,107 16,078 9,353 17,$50 12,464 Plan Note 1 - Induces land uses in the Mtop Area As shown in Table 5, year 2015 residential land use projections assume an additional 4,232 residential dwelling units to be constructed townwide over the existing total of 9,039. Of the additional units, 1,354 ate assumed within the downtown and Hilltop areas, with the remaining 2,878 units assumed to be constructed outside of the downtown' area. Year 2015 employment land use projections assume an additional 2,884 jobs to be created within the town of Truckee by the year 2015. Of these, 1,313 are estimated for the downtown area, with the remaining 1,571 being located outside of the downtown study area. General Plan residential land use projections assume an additional 4,579 residential dwelling units to be constructed townwide over the year 2015 estimated total of 13,271. Of the additional units, 278 are projected in the Downtown and Hilltop areas, with the remaining 4,301 projected to occur outside of the downtown study area. General Plan employment projections assume an additional 4,351 jobs to be created within the town of Truckee between the year 2015 and buildout of the general plan. Of these, 574 are estimated for the downtown arm with the remaining 3,672 being located outside of the downtown study area. in general, it has been assumed that the downtown area will experience aggressive growth within the 20 -year planning period, approaching buildout conditions by the year 2015. This assumption was made to provide a conservative estimate of transportation demands which are expected to occur in the downtown study area, Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv LSC, lne_ Page 26 11 11 t 1 1 t Trip generation rates, which were developed in the downtown traffic model existing conditions calibration, were applied to the year 2015 and General Plan land use data The resulting origin and destination data was then used in the ensuing roadway network alternatives analysis. Following Figure 9 and Table 6 presents total townwide and total downtown trip generation for existing, year 2015, and general plan land use conditions. Traffic Distribution To better understand the impact that development of the Mill Site will have on the downtown transportation network, it is important to identify traffic patterns for traffic accessing the Mill Site. To do this, the transportation model was used to identify the origins and destinations of every vehicle which accesses the Mill Site. It is important to note that for this distribution it was assumed that the State Route 267 Bypass, the Western Underpass, and the Tahoe -Donner Connection to downtown are constructed as existing programmed roadway improvements in the Town,of Truckee. Fig= 10 presents total year 2015 Mill Site traffic generation and traffic distribution by geographic area. In general, this analysis indicates the following: I. Approximately 21 percent of Miil Site generated traffic is oriented to and from the Martis Valley area. ► Approximately 47 percent of Mill Site generated traffic is oriented to and from the west of the Mill Site. ► Of this 47 percent, 11 percent is oriented to West River Street, 20 percent is oriented to Interstate 80 West, 13 percent is oriented to the Gateway Center area of Truckee, and 3 percent is oriented to the Commercial Row area. ► Of the remaining Mill Site oriented traffic, 11 percent is bound to and from Interstate 80 Fast, 13 percent is bound to and from the Glenshire and Prosser areas, and 8 percent is bound for Tahoe - Donner. ► Further evaluation of this traffic distribution indicates that 68 percent of Mill Site generated traffic is bound to the west or south of the Mill Site, which would require this traffic to pass through the already congested Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection. Through Traffic In addition to considering the impact that growth of traffic within the downtown area will have upon the existing roadway network, it is important to consider the effect of increasing traffic through downtown. To provide a quantitative base by which to consider the effect of through traffic on downtown transportation facilities, the origin and destination percentage of traffic that passes through downtown has been determined. Distribution of traffic that crosses the Truckee River at the existing bridge on Bridge Street/State Route 267 was evaluated as a gauge by which to estimate through traffic activity in downtown as a whole. Figure 11 presents the results of this analysis. This evaluation indicated that, of all traffic with origins and destinations to the north of the river, 30 percent is destined for the Commercial Row area and the planned Mill Site, with the remaining 70 percent bound for areas to the north, east„ and west of downtown. of all traffic with origins and destinations to the south of the river, 63 percent is bound for the Ponderosa Palisades and Hilltop areas, with the remaining 37 percent bound for areas to the south of the State Route 267 Bypass. From this infonuation, it can be concluded that more than two thirds of the traffic that enters the downtown area is through traffic. i'rucker Downiown Circulation 5turty LSC, Inc. IPage 27 Note:. Figure 9 E;dsung 2015 General Plan Downtown Outside bT C3awntovrn indicate growth from existing conditions. TABLE G: Trip Generation Outside of Downtown Downtown Existing 1,423 12,515 2015 3,268 20,360 General Plan 4,201 30,450 [Sourca LSC. 1996 Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv LSC. Inc_ Page 28 11 r q Trucker Downtown Circulation ® m C6 LU Ca N Q m C ® < t OD 0 r Q T d d = CD Z 00 a it7 [!S 0O u] m L i» Q Co R Ua LI} cty 0� CD ,0 (, 43 CL CL Q RS =_ 1 IC v� i3 C a w jj O m vs LSC. Inc. Page 29 Ln ca cry RS � t7 W to 9 _ u�7 o N e G9 _ cc Co N C CD C c r CC m r Co 0 0 Q � {17 N Cc � Q 0 mni M Q Q [� � C m RS Q A m a) (D Q d C V m C O G Co Cfl z k d LSC. Inc. Page 29 LL Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv ISC, Inc. Page 30 t � m ; ro m — all ro L � o 00 LO N f .� �- mm of c dog r .. Q �n4 m o 7V) 0 > O m ° C n C%I 'E C C� a CY C o � J co o �- c e rs 0 CU � T � r-�Y C 0 � � a ❑7 Cn r �� ro cc G ,. N Zn ca cr Et cc CL CL p 0 CD Cc = x [) Q; h c m Ls 'C7 C as v o tG cq L O Q I tm T- Q m C m CD q y� D ¢ ` o O ~ @ rn 0D m .. a a3 II 11 (D o x x alp �a t Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv ISC, Inc. Page 30 t i > The State Route 267 Bypass, scheduled for construction in the year 1998 and completion in the year 2001. The Western Railroad Underpass, scheduled for construction in the year 1997 and completion in the year 1998. The third Tahoe -Donner Connection to Bridge Street, which is currently not scheduled, but will likely be tied to development of property to the north of Interstate 80. As part of this roadway, it is assumed that a direct connection is also provided to State Route 89 North. Evaluation of intersection operations assuming this roadway alternative indicate that all roadways in the downtown study area can operate at acceptable levels of service in the year 2015 without widening any roadways to four lanes. This will, however, require signalization of the following four intersections in the year 2(115: ■ Bridge Streei/Commercial Row F Glenshire Drive/State Route 267 Western Underpass/West River Street • Westbound Interstate 80 off-ramp/State Route 267/State Route 89 North Figure 13 presents the results of the year 2015 and general plan intersection operations analysis. As shown, general plan land use results in the need for signalization at all of the intersections that were evaluated except two. Based on this analysis, and the stated goal of the Citizens Advisory Committee to avoid traffic signals in downtown, six roadway improvement alternatives and one reduced land use alternative have been developed in an attempt to eliminate the need for traffic signals in downtown Truckee within the 20 -year planning horizon. It should be noted that ultimate development of the general plan will result in the need for signalization at a majority of the downtown intersections, regardless of the roadway network improvements that are considered. However, since it is difficult to evaluate beyond the 20 -year time frame, the major focus of the discussion regarding each alternative relates to the year 2015 planning horizon. All of the following alternatives assume construction of the previously described programmed roadway improvements and provide a brief description of the proposed alternative, as well as the advantages and disadvantages associated with each. In addition, Table 7 provides a review of the functionality of each alternative and the traffic movements which it benefits. ALTERNATIVE 2 - EASTERN UNDERPASS (WEST ALIGNMENT) In addition to the programmed roadway improvements, this alternative assumes construction of a railroad underpass connecting East River Street to the west side of the balloon trach area. The purpose of this alternative is to provide Mill Site access to the south of the Southern Pacific Railroad right-of-way, and to provide an eastern underpass of the railroad tracks that would provide improved diversion routes through downtown during times of train blockages at the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing. Figure 14 presents future year intersection operations resulting from this alternative. This alternative improves Mill Site access to and from both the south and the west. Up to 65 percent of the total traffic accessing the bill Site could use this underpass. Traffic oriented to the south will be able to access the Mill Site without having to pass through the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection. Truckee Downtown Circuiarion Stud°v LSC, inc- Page 33 x a i Fa a gaa :j it ai c - c ~ a q C � a p ti r V u a U a g a 1 — �a \ 1 a C 1 Q \ CL 1 \1 O 1 �• t c ��-- a C a� o Q, Y a C EL U C pr C y H k1. C `a a a u a o+ ai N v wj c •� N C m v CN Q b v N w v E G 2.0 L 0 4 V 0: O c U p Q < ti 0. w � ci �; ° `c o o 0 tl tl p ll tl ti z 1 Z r 1�11 r w I 0 i Truckee downtown Girt dation Study isc. Inc. Page 34 t� F 0 i Truckee downtown Girt dation Study isc. Inc. Page 34 1 f] Ll t CJ i1 it t t Truckee Downtrawn Circulation Study LSC'. Inc. - ,._. .s_ Page 35 m oo.�. �C y N N r A N la a CL N P -0 E c ILE! >`a n a E Iz m a c z O rdi o 4 rn c a m c d4� LJ � N 0 to ! i , i • Le r �a C. �., m �P b co N w N 2 i CC s 3c m m a CL O z _ 4 [7 Y as N N C -r Tm � CN © qD CY v a a m � m m 1 2 m U � � • c a ¢ a Qa Z)¢ 9 [6 m m m m T m m c a w ww w a` wr� c7w ww a A. lb y q+ .a N_ -0 i� C C N f7 r 6n 10 1.- :: of cl �y Truckee Downtrawn Circulation Study LSC'. Inc. - ,._. .s_ Page 35 Z W U Ls1 i1 u co ♦i o CL 5 a Q s l [ � VI 0 C � c v_ c Cr c a a Q v Ft CL ca G c u 0 s ~ 'u a � s] L u � c 3 V} If) Q C a O A Q.,-, C) V7 4 a 9 v a C v ¢ 0� O 'N V) V7 V1 0 [L W O a -i p O i i i1 u ♦i o Truckee Dowp own Circulation Study IISC, j„c_ Page 36 II t 1 0 ri rl t Additionally, traffic from the west will be provided with an alternate route to the Mill Site via the Western Underpass, West River Street, and the Eastern Underpass (west alignment). This alternative also provides a "back door" route to the Glenshire area through the Mill Site to State Route 267 south of the Truckee River. Construction of this alternative provides sufficient traffic diversion around the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection to avoid the need for signalization at this intersection in the 20-yearplanning period. This alternative will, however, create additional left min and through traffic volumes on East River Street at the Bridge Street intersection, requiring its signalization. This signalization would probably be required in 10 to 15 years, depending upon development rates. It should be noted that signalization of Bridge Street/West River Street could be avoided with this alternative by closing the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing. Following is a list of advantages and disadvantages of this roadway construction alternative: 01 Improves access between the Mill Site and Ponderosa Palisades/Martis Valley. Improves access between the Mill Site and West River Street, Interstate 80 to the west, and Donner Pass Road. Improves access between Glenshire and State Route 267 south of the Truckee River. • Eliminates the need for a traffic signal at the Interstate 80 Westbound ramp/State Route 267 North/State Route 89 North intersection and the Glenshire/State Route 267 intersection. Eliminates the need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street and Commercial Row in the 20 -year planning time frame. Accelerates Accelerates the creed for a traffic signal at Bridge Street/West River Street, from approximately 2015 to approximately 2005-2010, Increases traffic volume on the residential portion of East River Street between the proposed underpass and Bridge Street. ALTERNATIVE 3 - EASTERN UNDERPASS (WEST ALIGNMENT) AND EASTERN RIVER CROSSING (WEST ALIGNMENT) In addition to the programmed roadway improvements, this alternative assumes construction of a railroad underpass connecting East River Street to the west side of the balloon track area, as described in Alternative 2. This underpass would then be connected to a roadway that crosses the Truckee River and continues to the tap of the bluff on the south side of the river, and ultimately connects to State Route 267 at or near the Palisades Drive intersection. The purpose of this alternative is to provide improved Mill Site access via construction of the Eastern Underpass (West), as described in Alternative 2, as well as providing a second crossing of the Truckee River within the downtown area. Figure 15 presents future year intersection operations of this alternative. This alternative improves Mill Site access to and from State Route 257 south of the Truckee River over Truckee Dbwnrawn Circulation Study LSC. Inc, —... - . page 37 d 4 t L �1 r l 5 t K fk _4 Z6 W 1 L.I.. 1 � 1 1 inLL CL S 1 t 0 •E c.: F -0 - C �! N 5 � :h N 6 s Q i y�y m ro tit G CL S 1 t 0 •E c.: F -0 - C �! N 5 � :h N 6 s Q i m ro m Truckee Downtawn Circulation Snag L.SC, Inc. Page 38 t t Alternative 2 by providing a more direct link between the Mill Site and State Route 267 to the south, as well as providing an alternative around the West River Street/Bridge Street intersection, and existing Bridge Street river crossing for north to east and west to south traffic movements across the Truckee River. Approximately 41 percent of the total river crossing traffic demand at the existing Bridge Street crossing of the Truckee River could be accommodated by this crossing. Additionally, approximately 65 percent of traffic bound to and from the Mill Site could use the Eastern Underpass portion of this alternative. Construction of this alternative provides sufficient traffic diversion around the Bridge StreetlCommercial Row and the Bridge Street/West River Street intersections to avoid the need for signalization at these intersections within the 20 -year time frame. Following is a list of advantages and disadvantages of this roadway construction alternative: I� ■ Improves access between the Mill Site and Ponderosa Palisades/Martis Valley. ■ Improves access between the Mill Site and West River Street, Interstate 80 West, and Donner Pass Road_ ■ Improves access between the Glenshue, Interstate 80 east, Prosser, and Tahoe -Donner areas and State Route 257 south of the Truckee River. 1 Eliminates the need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street/Commercial Row and Bridge Street/West River Street for at least 20 -years. ■ Reduces east -west traffic between the proposed railroad underpass and Bridge Street over Alternative 2. ■ Serves up to 41 percent of total river crossing traffic. Disadvantages ► Requires construction of a roadway across the Truckee River that will likely require the purchase of one single family dwelling unit along East River Street, and generate noise impacts on other residences. = Substantially increases traffic on Church Street. ■ May create significant visual impacts along the East River Street corridor. = The proposed river crossing would border the regional park along State Route 267 in the vicinity of Palisades Drive. ALTERNATIVE 4 - EASTERN UNDERPASS (WEST ALIGNMENT) AND WESTERN RIVER CROSSING In addition to the programmed roadway improvements, this alternative assumes construction of a railroad underpass connecting East River Street to the west side of the balloon track area, as described in Alternative 2. Additionally, South River Street would be extended to the west and continue across the Truckee River to align with the programmed Western Underpass. The purpose of this alternative is to provide improved Mill Site access via construction of the eastern underpass (West), as described in Alternative 2, as well as providing Truckee Downrown Circulation Studv LSC. Inc. page 39 0 w �Y r � w i i b � ■� �_ r t�LL93 r a rte. rr i " t ti ` 1,rem #' ft-ftK " j16° _4 { �i 5 d It 4 v P, l 1 � 1� N3 •.pempd +ei c i 1 ■ O G n q V C it r 4 S � U f r 1 ■x CL rt f1 ❑ Truckee Downtown Ciradalian $tudv LSC. Inc. Page 40 11 7 t C � C ' ■ ■ C i C ✓ � a � [5 C Q � i7i p+ - v= c 0. E a o v CLCU c u C 4 V 6 a' 0 V) o y LJ CJ D E 4 Q04 S/? 4 G : mom_ ... Q ,C] G 3 gou C CL O o a` II w II Il� I! IIII�y Il Z {' LLL (� r J ' f1 ❑ Truckee Downtown Ciradalian $tudv LSC. Inc. Page 40 11 7 t IF1 a second crossing of the Truckee River within the downtown area. Figure 16 presents future year intersection operations of this alternative. This alternative improves Mi11 Site access, as described in Alternative 2, through provision of the Eastern Underpass (West). This alternative also provides a diversion route around the West River Street/Bridge Street intersection for north to west and east to south traffic movements through downtown. Approximately 46 percent of the total river crossing traffic demand at the existing. Bridge Street crossing of the Truckee River could be accommodated by this alternative. Additionally, approximately 65 percent of traffic bound to and from the Mill Site could use the Eastern Underpass portion of this alternative. I t t 1 C 1 t Construction of this alternative does not, however, provide sufficient traffic diversion around the Bridge Street/West River Street/Commercial Row intersection to avoid the need for signalization of this intersection within the 20 -year time frame. It should be noted that signalization of Bridge Street/West River Street could he avoided with this alternative by closing the existing Bridge Street at -gate crossing. Reduction in total tragic volume at this intersection is similar to the Eastern Underpass alternative; however, the need for a traffic signal is drivers primarily by the left turzting movement from East River Street to State Route 267 south. This movement is decreased more dramatically in Alternative 3 than in this alternative. This alternative will, however, delay the need for signalization of Bridge Street/West River Street over Alternative 2. Following is a list of advantages and disadvantages of this roadway construction alternative: ■ improves access between the Mill Site and Ponderosa Palisades/Martis Valley.. ■ Improves access between the Mill Site and West River Street, Interstate 80 to the west, and Donner Pass Road. • improves access between the West River Street, State Route 89 South, interstate 80 West, and Donner Pass Road areas and State Route 267 south of the Truckee River. ■ Eliminates the need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street/Commercial Row. ■ Delays the need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street/ West River Street from the 10 to 15 year time frame in Alternative 2 to the 15 to 20 -year time frame. • Serves up to 46 percent of total river crossing traffic. Substantially reduces traffic on West River Street between the river crossing and Bridge Street. ■ Requires construction of a roadway across the Truckee River in the vicinity of the programmed Western Underpass that will require the purchase of commercial property on the south side of West River Street. ■ May create significant visual impacts along the West River Street corridor. ■ Substantially increases traffic through the South River Street residential area.. ■ Increases traffic along the East River Street residential area between Bridge Street and the proposed railroad underpass. Truckee Downtown Circulation 5audv LSC. Inc. Page 41 ALTERNATIVE 5 - EASTERN UNDERPASS (EAST) AND EAST RIVER STREET CONNECTION TO SR 267 BYPASS In addition to the programmed roadway improvements, this alternative assumes construction of a railroad underpass connecting East River Street to the east of the balloon track area. Additionally, East River Street would be improved from the existing gravel right-of-way to a paved roadway that would continue south- easterly across the Truckee River and connect to the State Route 257 Bypass via an at -grade intersection. The purpose of this alternative is to provide improved Mill Site access to the Martis Valley area and portions of the Ponderosa Palisades area. This alternative will also provide improved access for Martis Valley traffic wishing to access the Glenshire and Interstate 80 areas, as well as providing a local access connection to the State Route 267 Bypass. Figure 17 presents future year intersection operations of this alternative. This alternative provides access between State Route 257 south of the State Route 267 Bypass and the Mill Site via the State Route 267 Bypass, East River Street river crossing, and Eastern Underpass (East). Approximately 18 percent of the total river crossing traffic demand at the existing Bridge Street crossing could be accommodated by this river crossing. Additionally, approximately 21 percent of total traffic accessing the Mill Site could use this alternative. Construction of this alternative will stili require signali7ation of the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection within the 20 -year planning horizon. Construction of the Eastern Underpass on the eastern side of the balloon track does not provide for as much reduction in traffic at Bridge Street/Commercial. Row as does the construction of the Eastern Underpass on the western- side of the existing railroad balloon track This is because traffic accessing land uses on the western side of the Mill Site that originates west and south of downtown will be more likely to gain access via Donner Pass Road/State Route 267 to avoid out -of -direction travel. The location of the Eastern Underpass to the east of the balloon track also creates a more circuitous diversion for traffic wishing to avoid train blockages of the State Route 267 at -grade crossing on Bridge Street. Additionally, increases in eastbound left turning traffic at the East River Street/Bridge Street intersection will result in the need for signalization of this intersection in 15 to 20 -years. Following is a list of advantages and disadvantages of this roadway construction alternative: Improves access between the Mill Site and Martis Valley, Improves access between the Glenshire and Prosser areas and State Route 267 south of the State Rouge 267 Bypass. Reduces impact on existing residences along East River Street and State Route 267, Requires construction of a roadway across the Truckee River in the same vicinity as the State Route 267 Bypass. Dues not eliminate the need for traffic signals downtown, and speeds up the need for a traffic signal at Bridge StreetlWest River Street. Does not provide an easily accessible bypass of train blockages at the existing Bridge Street at -grade Truckee I)ownrown Circulation Studv LSC. Inc. Page 42 t 1 L� t [i 1�1 t 11 t t t I 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i I l \ 4 a • 0 V B Y C C 41t � CJ 1 Z] f 1 � 4 N , 1 4 4 1 t 1 ❑ • 4• LL a \ O u • C t 1f' m C7 SS L Q� [ R V C q C LnCL O G L) ~ C d L_ D ❑ cn Si 0 c = •- c c vi 'D E 0,_1 _a o Q of O m O y 4 c C' u a a a LL CL L -i x0 o O Q Q II II !! II II II Z LJ i V � Lr1 i _J ' i F 0 T -Wkee Dowruown Cirrularion 5rudy ISG. Inc. IPage 43 h Qj Lrj N o S 0 LL n Lei 5 0 T -Wkee Dowruown Cirrularion 5rudy ISG. Inc. IPage 43 N o S 0 n 5 0 T -Wkee Dowruown Cirrularion 5rudy ISG. Inc. IPage 43 crossing. ■ Increases east -west traffic between the proposed railroad underpass and Bridge Street, although not as much as Alternative 2. Could cause difficulties obtaining Caltrans approval and possibly impact the planned SR 267 Bypass construction. I. Serves only 18 percent of total river crossing traffic. ■ Noiselvisual impact on residences in Ponderosa Estates. ALTERNATIVE 6 - EASTERN 'UNDERPASS (WEST ALIGNMENT) AND GLENSHIRE CONNECTION TO SR 267 BYPASS In addition to the programmed roadway improvements, this alternative assumes construction of the Eastern Underpass (west alignment), as described in Alternative 2. Additionally, a roadway connection would be made between Glenshire Road and the State Route 267 Bypass via an at -grade intersection. The purpose of this alternative is to provide improved. Mill Site access via the Eastern Underpass (West), and to provide a river crossing option to Glenshire and Mill Site area traffic. This alternative will also provide improved access for Martis Valley traffic wishing to access the Glenshire area, as well as providing a local access connection to the State Route 267 Bypass. Figure 18 presents future year intersection operations of this alternative. This alternative provides an alternative river crossing for traffic bound between State Route 267 south of the State Route 267 Bypass and the Mill Site via the State Route 267 Bypass, and the Glenshire connector roadway. This alternative also provides for improved MiII-Site access via the Eastern Underpass (West) as described in the Alternative 2 discussion. Approximately 18 percent of the total river crossing traffic demand at the existing Bridge Street crossing could be accommodated by this alternative. Additionally, approximately 21 percent of total traffic accessing the Mill Site could use this alternative. Construction of this alternative will eliminate the need for signalizwion of the Bridge Street/Commercial Raw intersection within the 20 -year planning horizon. This is due mainly to the Eastern Underpass (West alignment) portion of this alternative. This alternative does not, however, eliminate the need for signalization at the Bridge Street/ West River Street intersection. Following is a list of advantages and disadvantages of this roadway construction alternative: Advantages Improves access between the Mill Site and Martis Valley. Improves access between the Glenshire area and State Route 267 south of the State Route 267 Bypass. Improves intersection operations at all Glenshire Drive intersections. Does not eliminate the need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street/West River Street.Could cause difficulties obtaining Caltrans approval and possibly impact the planned SR 267 Bypass construction. Serves only 18 percent of total river crossing traffic. Truckee Downtown Circulation Satdv t n t t L5C, IAC. Pulte 44 ' \ � Ducker Do*nio _ Cculmon5ntdv � * -.0". � � \ � /' \ ) i c S � 2 c \ o a E >; L } ��u o [$ z _ L ] 0 u oLOo E q&' 3 e e �± r CN @ 2 } k § ,0r\ oJ< < CL 7 / \ & \ \ \ i i ■ n � ■ z 2 LLI | , Q • m . w � Ducker Do*nio _ Cculmon5ntdv � * -.0". � � \ � New connector roadway impacts one residence. ALTERNATIVE 7 - EASTERN UNDERPASS (EAST ALIGNMENT) AND EASTERN RIVER CROSSING (EAST ALIGNMENT) In addition to the programmed roadway improvements, this alternative assumes construction of a railroad underpass connecting East River Street to the east side of the balloon track area, as described in Alternative 5. This underpass would then be connected to a roadway that crosses the Truckee River and ultimately connects to State Route 267 at the Palisades Drive intersection. The purpose of this alternative is to provide improved Mill Site access via construction of the Eastern Underpass (east alignment), as described in Alternative 5, as well as providing a second river crossing of the Truckee River within the downtown area. Figure 19 presents future year intersection operations of this alternative. Approximately 1$ percent of the total river crossing traffic demand at the existing Bridge Street crossing of the Truckee River could be accommodated by this alternative. Additionally, approximately 21 percent of total traffic accessing the Mill Site could use this alternative. Construction of this alternative will still require signalization of the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection within the 20 -year planning horizon. As discussed in Alternative 5, construction of the Eastern Underpass on the eastern side of the balloon track does not provide as great a reduction in traffic at Bridge 5treet/Commercia] Row as does construction of the Eastern Underpass on the western side of the balloon track. This is because traffic accessing land uses on the western side of the Mill Site that originates west and south of downtown will be more likely to gain access via Donner Pass Road/State route 267 to avoid out -of -direction travel. Location of the Eastern: Underpass to the east of the balloon track also creates a more circuitous diversion for traffic wishing to avoid train blockages of the State Route 267 at -grade crossing on Bridge Street. Additionally„ increases in eastbound left turning traffic at the East River Street/Bridge Street intersection will result in the need for signalization of this intersection in the 15 to 24 -year time frame. Following is a list of advantages and disadvantages of this roadway construction alternative: Improves access between the Mill Site and the Martis Valley/Ponderosa Palisades area Improves access between the Glenshire and Prosser areas and State Route 267 south of Palisades Drive. Avoids existing development. Requires construction of a roadway across the Truckee River and through the middle of the Truckee River Regional Park. Does not eliminate the need for traffic signals downtown, and hastens the need for a traffic signal at Bridge StreetfWest River 'Street Increases east -west traffic between the proposed railroad underpass and Bridge Street, although not as much as Alternative 2. Truckee Downtown Circulation Saedv LSC. Inc. Page 46 t t t 1 1 J I1 ii fJ 1 11 t I� t t t t t 1 Truckee Downtown Circulation 5tudv r � �i CL 1 qy %. C r + q a H N �`l Q � a C c� C C CT G C p �y��y Cr � Ca 0 •G C � O C7 V iL O � � C C v L, 4 JL U'1 Q n N Y C � a W Q Z 1 © Ln 67 N Ci 47 C A I[7 Q U Q �a L } Q .0-0 i— y, C7 L � � C L L a [ *CCI 9 p C CJ p Q d 11� V, 0 V'7 a` U.1 o II (; II fl II II Z I W C7 � Ld r Truckee Downtown Circulation 5tudv c LSC. Inc. Page 47 r � c � vJ� N �`l C p �y��y Cr � C � D ` •G C � ® � N � � C v n N Y Z 1 .10 y, 1 c LSC. Inc. Page 47 Serves only 18 percent of total river crossing traffic. ALTERNATIVE 8 - PROGRAtNlMED ROADWAY IMPROVEMENTS AND REDUCED MILL SITE DEVELOPMENT In addition to the programmed roadway improvements, this alternative assumes only 45 percent of planned Mill Site growth in the 20 -year time frame. This results in reduced traffic demand through the downtown area, and thus eliminates the need for signalization of Bridge StreetlCominercial Row, and Bridge Street/West River Street. Forty-five percent of projected year 2015 Mill Site growth is the maximum that can be accommodated by the Bridge Street/West River Street intersection in the 20 -year time frame without warranting the need for signalization. Figure 20 presents future year intersection operations of this alternative. Eliminates the need for signalization of all downtown intersections with the exception of the Western Underpass/West River Street intersection. r13W4 T[ Limits growth potential of the Mill Site Area. Consideration of Modern Roundabouts An alternative to a traffic signal at the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection is the construction of a modem roundabout. A modern roundabout is physically possible in this intersection and could avoid the need for a traffic signal while improving pedestrian crossing conditions. There are a number of issues, however, that need to be evaluated when considering a modern roundabout at this location: The close proximity of this intersection to the Southern Pacific Railroad right-of-way could cause: northbound traffic wishing to enter the roundabout to queue into the railroad right-of-way, thus creating a potentially hazardous conflict between train and automobile traffic. This could also cause vehicles in the railroad right-of-way to be hit by the descending rail crossing gates. Construction of a modern roundabout at this location would result in the elimination of some on -street parking along Commercial Row and along Bridge Street. Construction of a modern: roundabout at this location would also require acquisition of additional right-of-way from both of the existing gas stations in the southeast and southwest quadrants of the Commercial Row/Bridge Street intersection. This is not to say that construction of a modem roundabout is entirely impossible at Bridge Street/Commercial Row. For instance, it would be possible to prevent queuing from occuring in the railroad right-of-way by using the existing railroad crossing gates in combination with a traffic signal at the Bridge StreetlWest River Street intersection. This would require that the traffic signal be designed with railroad preemption that would eliminate traffic on Bridge Street between West River Street and the railroad crossing gates prior to the lowering of the crossing gates. This would also, however, require additional all -red time at the Bridge Street/West River Street traffic signal that could substantially reduce capacity at that intersection. To fully quantify the advantages and disadvantages of a modern roundabout at this location, a feasibility study would have to be performed which considers the above issues, as well as construction costs, maintenance costs, Tnwkee Downrown Circudarion Study j SCI Inc. Page 48 1 t 11 b 1 c env Y --------------- , a a i cu ti 41 6 Y r.yy ■R��{ m in O ■ D V � N ��w In 4 ■ i C r i.l ■ y� v 1 4�] E m Tj C W Qi GK � C7 y .la C}� a � N � _ t O O ° w pr k C� Q L ur z CI C (� U ON C 1 as � i— L6 N V) 6 r y LLL 0 _ Ul ❑ ' lu LO co Lf) C14 7 4 G r O 'e p � 00 4 0 v7 Q LW © Q d J Q E9 ws I W I I 1 - LJ I Truckee Downwwn Circulation Snidv LSC, Inc. . Page 49 intersection capacity, and environmental impacts. Location of Proposed Eastern Underpass Through the review of the alternatives analysis, it was identified that an undercrossing of the Southern Pacific Railroad, located to the east of the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing, would be necessary as part of the future Truckee transportation network The underpass is needed to mitigate the expected future impact of train activity at the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing. In addition, the underpass could eliminate the need for signalization of the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection, the Glenshire Drive/State Route 267 intersection, and the interstate 80 westbound off-ramp/State Route 267/State Route 89 north intersection. Whether or not signalization of these intersections would be required depends upon the location of the proposed underpass. In the preceding alternatives analysis, two alternate alignments of the eastern underpass were evaluated. The location of the first alternative considered is approximately 1,000 feet to 1,200 feet east of the Bridge Street/West River Street intersection. This is described as the Eastern! Underpass (west alignment). The location of the second alternative considered is approximately 2,500 feet to the east of the Bridge Street/West River Street intersection. This is described as the Eastern Underpass (east alignment). In addition, a third alignment has been considered for the purposes of this discussion, which would be located between the above two alignments. This is referred to as the Eastern Underpass (central alignment). Figure 21 presents the conceptual location of the above three alignments. As shown in Figure 21, the wes a i=ment�begins, on the south at an intersection with East River Street, then descends and passes beneath the Southern Pacific Railroad mainline and the throat of the Southern Pacific Railroad balloon track At this point the alignment is approximately 18 feet below existing ground level. It would then rise to meet existing ground level near the proposed Church StreetlEastern Underpass Road/State Route 267 intersection. Thesmtrai ali==nt begins on the south at an intersection with East River Street, then descends and passes beneath the railroad mainline. It would then rise to meet existing ground level in the center of the balloon track. The alignment could continue to the north, across the northern portion of the balloon track via an at - grade crossing, and intersect State Route 267 opposite the existing Keiser Avenue intersection. The = alignment begins on the south at an intersection with East River Street, thea descends and passes beneath the railroad mainline. It would rise to meet existing ground level to the east of the balloon track At this point the alignment could continue to the north and intersect with Glenshire Drive, approximately 750 feet to the east of the Glenshire Drive/State Route 257 intersection. With each of the above alternatives, it may be necessary to lower the grade of East River Street a few feet to provide an acceptable grade between East River Street and the low point of the underpass. It should also be pointed out that each of the above alignment alternatives would connect the underpass roadways to Mill Site access roadways. These connections have not been shown or fully evaluated in this analysis due to the numerous access roadway configurations which could be generated. Typically, these types of detailed site design issues are addressed in the environmental review process that occurs during project approval. Two alignment alternatives of the primary Mill Site access roadway have been presented, however, to give an idea. of how the Mill Site could be connected to the proposed underpass alignments.. To provide an evaluation basis by which to compare the three underpass alignments, the distribution of traffic that crosses the railroad tracks has been determined. Figure 22 presents the origins and destinations of all traffic that crosses the existing at -grade crossing. It should be pointed out that this distribution assumes Truckee Downtown Circulation Sradv LSC, Inc. Page 50 t 1 J !I u 1 �I W t (U a© Eli c LO Truckee Downtown Circulation S4&v LSC, Inc. Page 51 N Q1 Truckee Downtown Circulation Stadv LSC. frrc. Page 52 Q �= I c2 - co cn Icr- w � U) 43 � 0 m rri Q d x d O� k t- m iG R N r k 7 1tf R U7 cn N N m � #17 d t] E �rr4: �0 p I 0- i !7 c co40I U cc m N I N C14 a co L ¢ o L G a mE coV) "r 4 CY +f k mm m L o ZC u7 � 4 C k �co I LU� Cc • co 0 -lo to V cy 0 i N Q1 Truckee Downtown Circulation Stadv LSC. frrc. Page 52 construction of the Western Underpass, SR 267 Bypass and third Tahoe -Domeier connection. As shown in Figure 22, approximately 25 percent of all traffic crossing the railroad tracks is bound for the existing downtown area of Truckee. An additional 28 percent is bound for the Tahoe -Donner area. The retraining 48 percent of the traffic at the at -grade crossing is bound for the Mill Site, Gienshire area. and interstate $O/State I Route 89 North. The following discussion presents the advantages and disadvantages of each of the three alignments under consideration. n 1 r� u Western Alignment - This alternative provides the closest diversion route around train blockages of the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing of the three alternatives that have been considered. This alternative would provide a viable diversion option for all traffic that crosses the railroad tracks at the existing at -grade crossing. FXI • Provides a downtown diversion route around train blockages of at -grade crossing that can be used by all drivers crossing the railroad tracks. Can be easily used by traffic entering and exiting the Mill Site that is bound for points to the south and to the west of the Mill Site. Eliminates (for at least 20 -years) the need for a traffic signal at the Bridge StreetlCommercial Row intersection. By itself, this alternative impacts the shortest length of the East River Street residential district because drivers accessing the underpass are diverted a shorter distance down East River Street than either of the outer two altematives. ■ The location of the roadway will provide easy access to and from the underpass from all of the Mill Site. The location of the roadway will not bisect the land uses within the Mill Site with a high volume roadway (the alignment is to the west of most of the proposed Mill Site development). t J 1.1 • Most expensive of the three alternatives because it requires the most underpass structure to be. constructed. • Makes future connection across the river to State Route 267 more challenging and expensive. P. Increases traffic on Church Street. Impacts proposed rail museum site. Impacts East River Street Central Alignment - This alternative provides a diversion route around thin blockages at the existing at -grade Bridge Street crossing, albeit somewhat more circuitous than the Western alignment. This alternative still remains effective at providing a bypass around train blockages for most traffic, but it requires more out -of - direction travel than the Western Alignment. Traffic that is bound for the downtown district will be less likely Truckee Downtown Circulation Smdv LSC, !AC. Page 53 to use this alternative to bypass train related congestion, and more likely to use the programmed Western Underpass. Traffic which is bound for Tahoe -Donner would still be likely to use this diversion, as opposed to the Western Underpass. Provides a convenient diversion route around train blockages of the Bridge Street at -grade crossing for Tahoe -Donner, Mill Site, Glenshire, and interstate 80 East/State Route 89 North traffic. Less expensive to construct than the West Alignment. Can be conveniently used by approximately 75 percent of all drivers wanting to cross the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing. Bisects the interior of the balloon track with a relatively high volume roadway, making the existing land use plan very difficult to implement. P. Causes traffic impacts to a longer section of East River Street than the West Alignment. ■ Increases traffic on Jibboom Street. Makes future connection across the river to State Route 267 challenging and expensive, similar to the Western Alignment. ■ Does not eliminate the need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street/Commercial Row (it does, however, delay this need to the 15 to 20 -year time frame). ■ Does not provide convenient access around train blockages of the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing for traffic that is bound for downtown and Commercial Row. Eastern Alignment - This alternative provides a diversion route around train blockages of the existing at - grade Bridge Stmt crossing, although by itself it is much more circuitous than either the Western or Central Alignments. Traffic that is bound for the Tahoe -Donner and downtown/Commercial Row areas would not use this alternative to bypass train related congestion. Instead, downtown/Commercial Row traffic would use the programmed Western Underpass (west of Bridge Street), and Tahoe -Donner bound traffic would not he conveniently served, although some would use the programmed Western Underpass. Traffic bound to and from the western portion of the Mill Site would be forced to perform a greater amount of out -of -direction travel as a result of the underpass being Iocated to the east of a large portion of the Mill Site development. This can be partially mitigated by providing the majority of off-street Mill Site parking in the vicinity of the underpass. It should be noted, however, that a significant amount of on -street parl€ing will still need to be provided on the Mill Site to the west of the underpass, if this area is expected to be a viable commercial district. This alternative would be made more feasible by encouraging Tahoe -Donner traffic to use State: Route 89 North and the State Route 267 Bypass rather than the Bridge Street connection. This would reduce the traffic level using the underpass. Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv LSC. Inc. Page 54 Ji i 11 1 t 11 I Adnatues ■ Provides a convenient diversion route around train blockages of the Bridge Street at-grade crossing for some of Mill Site and Glenshire traffic. Provides marginally convenient diversion for Interstate 80 East/State Route $9 North traffic. ■ This is the least expensive and easiest to construct of the three alignments under consideration_ ■ Makes future connection across the Truckee River much easier than with the other two alternatives, ' This alternative, in conjunction with a river crossing and connection to State Route 267, could conveniently serve approximately 75 percent of all traffic which wishes to cross the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing. With the new river crossing, i alternative y oss g, th s would have the least impact on East River Street. Disadvantages IBy itself, this alternative causes the greatest traffic impact along East River Street of the three alternatives under consideration. This is because it draws traffic past nearly all of the houses along the East River Street corridor, as opposed to only the houses on the western portion of East River Street. This could be significantly mitigated by providing a connection across the Truckee River to State Route 267, thereby diverting traffic to the new river crossing and off of East River Street. ' ■ i Does not eliminate the need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street/Cornmercial Row. ■ Without a river crossing, this alignment will conveniently serve only 25 to 30 percent of the traffic using the existing railroad crossing.. ■ Does not provide convenient access around train blockages of the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing for traffic that is bound for downtown/Commercial Row or Tahoe -Donner. Also creates circuitous travel for traffic that is bound for the western portion of the Mill Site. Railroad Underpass Alignment - Summary/Conclusions Each of the preceding three alignment alternatives has various strengths and weaknesses. The Western 1? g � g Alignment, by itself, provides the greatest benefit to traffic flow in the downtown area and Mill Site, and affects the least number of residences along East River Street of the alternatives considered. This alignment also allows the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection to operate at an acceptable Level Of Service without a traffic signal. This alignment, however, is also the most expensive of the underpass alternatives to construct, and creates the most difficulty with a future roadway connection across the Truckee River, The Central Alignment is less expensive to construct than the Western Alignrnent, but also serves approximately 25 percent less traffic. This alternative also creates difficulties with a future extension across the Truckee River, and effectively bisects the interior of the balloon track with a relatively high volume roadway. Due to this last impact, this alternative should not be considered further. The Eastern Alignment, by itself, serves the least amount of traffic and creates the greatest traffic impacts to Truckee Downrown Circulation Study Z'sc' Inc. Page 55 East River Street of the three alignments considered. However, this alternative, with an extension across the Truckee River to State Route 267, could serve a similar amount of traffic as the Central Alignment, while also significantly mitigating traffic impacts along East River Street. Constructing the roadway connection to State Route 267 in this area is also easier than with the Western and Central Alignments. This alternative, however, does not eliminate the need for a traffic signal at the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection. Of the three underpass alignments considered, either the Western Alignment or the Eastern Alignment,. combined with a crossing of the Truckee River and connection to State Route 267 in the vicinity of Estates Drive, is the most desirable from a traffic flow standpoint. in addition to providing a bypass of train blockages, the Western Alignment would have the added benefit of eliminating the need for a traffic signal at the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection in the 20 -year time frame. The Eastern Alignment, combined with a crossing of the Truckee River, will delay, but not totally eliminate, the need for a traffic signal at the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection in the 20 -year time frame, This alternative also has the added benefit of providing a second crossing of the Truckee River, which will help to address long term (20 -year plus) growth issues in the downtown area. Roadway Alternatives Analysis - Summary/Conclusions The preceeding detailed roadway alternatives analysis provides a number of insights regarding transportation demand versus available transportation facilities in downtown Truckee. Based upon the detailed alternatives analysis, the following general conclusions have been reached: ■ Twenty-year planning horizon traffic levels can be accommodated within the downtown area without four -lane roadways. However, this will require construction of new roadway facilities, such as the State Route 267 Bypass, and the Western Underpass. Additionally, signalization of some intersections or construction of new roadway facilities, in addition to the State Route 267 Bypass and Western Underpass, will be required. ■ Construction of the Western Underpass and the State Route 267 Bypass delays the existing need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street/Commercial Row, as well as at Bridge Street/West River Street and at Glenshire Road/State Route 267. However, signalization of these intersections would still be required in the 10 to 20 -year planning horizon, barring construction of additional roadway improvements. ■ Construction of a Railroad Underpass between the Mill Site/State Route 267 area North of the railroad tracks and East River Street is required to eliminate delay associated with train blockages of the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing. Based upon the Town of T13&kQe Railroad Merger Traffic act, AnalXs s, vehicular delay associated with train crossing activity will increase by approximately 50 percent over existing levels without construction of this roadway component. ■ The Glenshire Road/ State Route 267 intersection will require signalization, or the construction of a roundabout in the 10 to 20 -year planning horizon. The need for either of these improvements can be delayed by providing an arterial type roadway along the southern edge of the Mill Site that intersects State Route 267 at Church Street, and that intersects Glenshire Road east of the Glenshire Road/State Route 267 intersection. • Access to the Mill Site should be oriented more to State Route 267 than to Glenshire Road. This delays the need for signalization at the Glenshire Road intersection. ■ An eastbound central Truckee on-ramp provides little benefit to downtown traffic and should not be constructed as a mitigation to downtown traffic problems. Most of the demand to and from this Truckee Dowwown Circulation Study LSC, Inc. Page 56 1 1 n 1 1 proposed on-ramp would be from tate Gateway Center area and areas between Gateway Center and ' downtown. This traffic however is not diverted from downtown, but diverted from the State Route 89 South/Interstate 80 interchange arca. • The third Tahoe -Donner connection to Bridge Street, in conjunction with the Western and Eastern Underpasses and eastern river crossing, reorients the Bridge Street/Conunercial Row intersection traffic so the primary traffic movement is north -south. This creates more typical traffic patterns at this intersection. Closure of the existing at -grade rail crossing with this connection, however, would create awkward travel patterns in the Church Streetl]ibboom Street area. ■ Following is a list of the alternatives that were considered and eliminated. A Existing programmed improvements with traffic signals at Bridge Street/Commercial ' Row, Bridge Street/West River Street, West River StreeL[Western Underpass Road, Glenshire Road/State Route 267, and Interstate 80 Westbound/State Route 89 North/State Route 267 South intersections. This alternative would provide adequate ' intersection operations for the 20 -year planning time frame. However, this alternative does not provide an eastern diversion route around train blockages of the existing at -grade Bridge Street crossing. Based upon the Railroad Merger Traffic Impact Analysis prepared for the Town of Truckee, it is estimated that delay associated with rail activity at the at -grade ' crossing will increase by 50 percent over existing levels in the 20 -year time frame. For this reason, this was eliminated as a viable altemadve. B Existing programmed roadway improvements with construction of the East River Street to State Route 267 Bypass connection, and the Eastern Underpass located east of the - balloon track area of the NO Site. This alternative was discarded because it was found that the eastern alignment of the eastern undercrossing does not provide sufficient diversion options to eliminate the need for signalization of Bridge Street and Commercial Row. Additionally, construction of a river crossing at this location would have the potential of capturing only 18 percent of river crossing demand, as opposed to the West alignment of the eastern river crossing, which could capture up to 41 percent of river crossing demand, or the western river crossing alternative, which could capture up to 46 percent of total river crossing demand. C Existing programmed roadway improvements with construction of the Eastern Underpass (west alignment) and a connection from the State Route 267 Bypass to Glenshire Drive. This alternative was eliminated because the construction of the Glenshke connection does not provide enough diversion of traffic to eliminate the need for traffic signalization of the Bridge Street/West River Street intersection. The Eastern Underpass (western alignment) portion of this alternative does eliminate the need for signalization of the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection. Primary benefits of this alternative are to the Glenshire/State Route 267 and State Route 267/Interstate 80 ramp intersections. However, ' signalization of these intersections can also be avoided with only the Eastern [Underpass (west alignment) construction. ■ Of the alternatives considered, the following are viable for consideration by the CAC in selecting a preferred alternative. All alternatives provide acceptable traffic operations in the 20 -year planning horizon. ' A Existing programmed roadway improvements with construction of the Eastern Underpass (west alignment) and a traffic signal at the Bridge StreetlWest River Street ' Truckee Downtown Circulation Stztdv L.SC. Inc. Page 57 intersection. This alternative provides improved access to the Mill Site, as well as providing a diversion around the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection during periods of ' congestion or during periods of train blockages of the existing Bridge Street at -grade ' crossing. This alternative eliminates the need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street/Commercial Row, State Route 2671Glenshire hive, and the Interstate 80 westbound/State Route 257/State Route 89 North intersections without reducing development potential of the Mill Site. Realignment of the West River Street/Western Underpass Road intersection would provide an alternative to signalization of this intersection. B Existing programmed roadway improvements with construction of the Eastern Underpass (west alignment) and Eastern River Crossing (west alignment) and realignment or signalization of the West River Streei/Western Underpass Road intersection. This alternative provides a parallel route across the Truckee River into the Mill Site and downtown areas, around the existing Bridge Street River crossing, which relieves ' traffic congestion on the downtown intersections, thereby eliminating tate need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street/Commercial Row and Bridge StreetlWest River Street in the 20 -year planning horizon. It is estimated that up to 41 percent of total river crossing traffic could be captured by this alternative_ C Existing programmed roadway improvements with construction of the Eastern Underpass east of the balloon track area of the Mill Site, and the Eastern River crossing, ' east alignment (along the southeastern edge of the regional park) This alternative was retained because it provides the easiest route by which to cross the Truckee River. It should be noted, however, that this alternative does not provide the most direct travel route around blockages of the Bridge Street at -grade railroad crossing of the alternatives that have been considered. This alternative, if implemented, should be combined with the provision of off- street mill -site parking in the immediate vicinity of the Eastern Underpass roadway ' alignment. This will focus vehicular access to parking facilities on the Eastern Underpass and river crossing. D Existing programmed roadway improvements with construction of the Eastern Underpass (west alignment) and Western River crossing with a tragic signal at Bridge Street/West River Street, and signalization of the West River Street/Western Underpass Road Intersection. This alternative provides a parallel route across the Truckee River to the west of downtown and the Mill Site around the existing Bridge Street river crossing_ It is estimated that this alternative could capture up to 46 percent of total river crossing traffic, making it slightly more effective than the eastern river crossing alternative at processing river crossing traffic. This alternative does not, however, eliminate the need for a traffic signal at the Bridge StreetfWest River Street intersection in the 20 -year planning horizon, due to the increased left turning traffic on the East River Street approach to this intersection caused by the Eastern Underpass (West Alignment). This alternative would, however, delay the need for signalization of this intersection from the 10 to 15 -year time frame to the 15 to 20 -year time frame. Note, with this alternative, realignment of West River Street and the Western ' Underpass Roadway is not an option to signalization. E Existing programmed roadway improvements with construction of the Eastern Underpass (west alignment) and closure of the Bridge Street at -grade crossing, and realignment or signalization of the West River StreetlWestern Underpass Road intersection. This alternative would allow for the elimination of traffic signals at the Bridge Truckee Downtown Circulation Sn4dv LSC. Inc. Page 58 Street/Commercial Row and Bridge Street/West River Street intersections. This alternative reorients the traffic turning movements at the aforementioned Bridge Street intersections in such a manner as to preclude the need for signalization of these intersections. This alternative does, however, alter circulation patterns to and through the existing historic downtown area. F Existing programmed roadway improvements with the Eastern Underpass (west alignment) and land development potential for the Mill Site limited to 45 percent of 20 - year land use projections, with realigrunent or a traffic signal at the Western Underpass/West River Street intersection, The reduced land use in this alternative reduces traffic demand into downtown to a level that will eliminate the need for traffic signals at all downtown intersections, with the exception of the Western Underpass/West River Street intersection. This alternative still provides a diversion route around train blockages of the existing Bridge Street at -grade crossing. Truckee Downtown Circulation LSC, Inc. Page 59 Chapter 6 Parking A2LILsis Existing Parking Supply Parking supply in the downtown study area was inventoried by Town of Truckee planning staff in February of 1996. The parking inventory consisted of determinr g the number of parking spaces that are currently available in the downtown area The inventory was performed for fifteen individual street segments within the downtown study area and adjacent off-street parking lots. For each street segment, the number of parking spaces was inventoried for each of the following four categories. Public unrestricted parking - defined as on -street public parking spaces with no time restrictions. Public restricted parking - defined as on -street public parking with two-hour parking time limits. • Private unrestricted parking - defined as private parking lots with no signage restricting use of parking. ■ Private restricted parking - defined as private parking lots that allow parking for only certain businesses. Table 8 presents the parking inventory for each of the fifteen street, segments that were ,inventoried in the downtown area. As shown, there are 78 public unrestricted parking spaces in the downtown area, 322 public restricted parking spaces, 337 private unrestricted parking spaces, and 409 private restricted parking spaces, for a total of 1,146 parking spaces in the downtown study area. The public unrestricted spaces represent only 7 percent of the total spaces in the downtown area. Existing Parking Demand To determine existing parking demand in the downtown study area, Town of Truckee planning staff performed occupancy surveys for each of the fifteen downtown street segments under consideration. The occupancy surveys were performed during Saturday and Sunday afternoon time periods on Presidents Day weekend in February of 1996. This occupancy data represents a near worst-case parking demand scenario for the downtown area, as it was recorded during a peak time period during a peak demand weekend„ but during the winter as opposed to summer months. Occupancy data was recorded during four time periods for each of the fifteen street segments. Appendix C presents parking occupancy data by street. segment and category during each of the four time periods. Table 9 presents average parking occupancy of the four time periods that were analyzed. To provide a basis by which to evaluate parking demand in the downtown area, the peak observed utilization has been used as a basis to evaluate peak parking demand. This time period corresponds to conditions which were observed during the Saturday afternoon of Presidents Day weekend- Parking occupancy for this time period is approximately 10 percent higher than for the average conditions presented in Table 9. Table 10 presents the observed Saturday peak period parking occupancy percentage that was observed for each of the fifteen streets that were considered. As shown in Table 10, peak period parking occupancy for tine total downtown area for all types of parking is 70 percent of capacity. Of the two-hour, or public restricted parking spaces, that were surveyed, peak occupancy was 90 percent. Typically, two-hour parking spaces are located in areas of high parking demand. The two-hour designation is given to prevent vehicles from remaining parked throughout the day in the most desirable parking Truckee Downtown Circufwion Snudv LSC Inc. Page 60 1 1 Truckee Downtown CGrculation Studv LSC. Inc. I Page 61 fq r C7 ct 47 r-- CO M M N to p +- co ti r. CCS CC) iv LC) eT tD r'-- 0 'r! � C1i Y r r r -p M 0 to � 0 co tt Et r iC) 0 M CLti Ln Ln CTS a) n5 L[] G7 V F r r r N R Ca R) RT Z Y a N 4 cr: _ z t5 C7 N LD C] Lo (fl 0 0 F -r [h a Ln co 0 0) rl- Lct) Y C'7 co C+J C co 7 ' d Ca C Cf a CZ ti C17 0 00 Ca O A O C] N Q C'J co � t3 Cl) 4 N to r. 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C7 o N C3 F- 4 CV N CV CV N N N C'3 N �I�} N o7 C-0 COY 0 0 V] 655 'Q 6 a5 E U L i Lei TS UI Cl) m m t U U _ 0) 0 � 01 Ali ❑ ❑ U 'm+� j m 0 b 0 c c c 0 c c o Q [i co [C m m w X W RS co z3 m iC L A' y QTS rir w a) 0 0 U7 p� 0 > ca C V] C-Cn Cr3 in �' Uy UJ cn try ucc5 {/� O C m '� c c -0cr.Qs m �7 c cs 'n a) m zJ C g L 2 '0 r_ (D-0 m 0 CLQ 0 ❑SCA 0 '� D ❑ wm Ctf a e U c [7C},❑ 0 U [!y U U7��,, O a i m D C Q N C 4) Q) C 0 N C m Q) C �" 4) C a Q) 4) C � 4) m o C 0 CO cv= Q) C 0 = m 2 C r/1 m a❑ u) C 0 y 0 p m 3N Cp 3a Q) Stn � 4) 3 � m 3 � 0 3� r m 3----�� o -� 0 3� — 4) 3— a) 3 m 3a � Q) 3�••- " .r �- 0 m CD 3 � co 7,. ) 0 Q} Cm tm0 s COC 0 (1) Q) m 0 a 0 m 0a"" 0 m ® O in 0 tt � LU IM ` CO m � @ in as � M 0 >., M 0 0 C M me i LU m � M cnLLJ � � U74V1Ci � Q r cn m o 0 ro CB � C3C]�`cLtC7crr "T r r 100 Z Truckee Downtown Circulation Sa1dv LSC, Inc. 1 Page 63 1 spas within a given influence area The fact that the occupancy of the two-hour spaces in the downtown area is 90 percent during peak demand periods indicates a relatively high demand for parking, particularly within the I commercial core area The effective maximum desirable occupancy of parking spaces in a given area is typically 95 percent of total ' parking supply. The remaining 5 percent of the parking supply is typically lost to vehicles entering and exiting parking spaces. Using 95 percent of total spaces as the effective capacity is prudent to ensure that drivers are not forced to search e:.:m-vely for available spaces during peak parking demand times, thereby causing ' additional congestion. To more fully evaluate characteristics of existing parking demand in the downtown study area, the portion of the study area that is most impacted by parking issues has been segmented into five parking analysis zones. Figure 23 presents the boundaries of the analysis zones. Also included in Figure 23 are the effective supply of parking spaces in each of the parking analysis zones, as well as existing parking demand for each analysis zone for Saturday afternoon peak demand periods. Existing parking demand was evaluated by comparing the observed Saturday peals parking to parking demand I calcubu i through the use of Urban Land Institute parking generation rates. The Urban Land Institute rates were then calibrated to parking generation characteristics of downtown Truckee by adjusting the parking generation rates so that, when multiplied by existing land use quantities, the parking demand matches existing observed demand in the downtown area. In general it was found that parking demand rates in Truckee currently exceed I the Urban Land Institution rates by 15 percent. As shown in Figure 23, existing parking demand within the downtown study area is met in all areas except Zone ' 2, which is the Commercial Row area to the west of Bridge Street. (This zone generates peak period demand for approximately 91 more parking spaces than are provided within the zone boundaries. Since there is a surplus parking supply in adjacent Zones 1 and 3 (Brickeltown and the commercial core east of Bridge Street), some ' motorists wishing to park in Zone 2 instead park in either Zones 1 or 3 as a result of the Iack of supply in Zone 2. Future Parking Supply and Demand To estimate future parking requirements, the calibrated existing conditions parking generation rates developed ' in the existing conditions analysis were applied to the projected year 2015 land uses within each of the parking analysis zones. The resulting parking demand from these calculations is presented in Figure 24. The impact of streetscape improvements, proposed roadway cross section changes, and effect of infill ' development have been evaluated to determine their impacts to existing parking supply. Additional on -street parallel parking is proposed along West River Street, which will add to the existing parking supply in this area. ' Additional on -street angle parking has been proposed for the portion of Donner Pass Road west of Spring Street. This, however, is not recommended bem= of safety, congestion, and visual impact issues that would be created.. For that reason, tate additional on -street parking spaces that would result from the creation of angle parking have instead been assumed as parallel parking spaces. For planning purposes, it is estimated that infill development will cause a slight reduction in available parking supply within Zones 1, 2, and 3. This is a result of building development that will displace some existing off-street parking. ' As shown in Figure 24, the projected parking demand in Zones 1, 3, and 5 is equal to or less than projected year 2015 parking supply, indicating that parking demand should not be a major issue within these zones alone. The , remaining two zones (2 and 4) indicate projected parking supply shortfalls as a result of infill development of Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv LSC. Inc. i Page 6.4 1 Truckee Downtown Circulation 5 LSC, Inc. Page 65 r 47 C" C 7 V C i Y CL C3 C Q 7 W V 0 Q as p1 c7 N N C C C 11 N N E O C) Q Q e e c G a C II CL EI li l IIS II ,q w C3 i # � LLJ � m {) +a I :..I LSC, Inc. Page 65 r �4 N c�pog,l�yd Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv LSC. Inc. Page 66 ?I al ul q1 ,p O 7 W E 7 0 d Os Q Q m 77 Vi 41 Y 21 21 a a a` c c 1r C o, O 4 c aayy LnJ ' n LLJ n I Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv LSC. Inc. Page 66 ' the existing business district and new development on the Mill Site. Mill Site Parking Demand Zone 4 (the Mill Site) is projected to generate demand for 1,081 parking spaces by the year 2015_ Of this demand, approximately 850 parking spaces would be required to service the weekend commercial activity. The remaining demand of 231 parking spaces is distributed between the office, residential, and lodging land uses planned for the Mill Site. It should be noted that, during the ween, parking demand for the Mill Site is approximately the same as for 1 weekend peak periods. However, the rrudweek parking demand is generated by a combination of commercial and office land uses as opposed to largely the commercial uses, as is the case on weekends. During midweek days, the office component is projected to generate demand for approximately 400 spaces, with the commercial component generating demand for approximately 450 parking spaces. The remaining weekday demand of approximately 170 spaces is generated by the residential and lodging components of the Mill Site development. 1 This point indicates that, if the office and retail components of the Mill Site development are located in close proximity to one another, the potential for shared parking is much greater than if the office and retail components are located at a distance from one another. This lowers the total parking supply required to service the Mill Site ' by approximately 30 to 35 percent. Another item for consideration in providing parking for the planned Mill Site development is the location of off-street parking lots and effective manners by which to provide access from these lots to and from the rest of the Mill Site and the existing commercial core. Commercial Core Parking„ Demand t I Parking analysis Zone 2 (the existing Commercial Row and Jibboom Street area) is projected to have a parking shortfall of approximately 302 parking spaces. As discussed in the existing conditions analysis, a shortfall of approximately 90 parking spaces currently exists in this area. The increased shortfall of 208 spaces is a result of inftli development projected along Commercial Row and Jibboom Street in the 20 -year planning time frame. As was also stated in the existing conditions analysis, the existing parking shortfall is met through parking demand spilling over into adjacent Zones 1 and 3. However, with the projected year 2015 parking demand, these adjacent zones will not have adequate capacity to absorb the excess demand. This is a key point because it indicates that the projected year 20115 parking demand will over saturate parking supply in the entire commercial care during peals demand periods. To prevent this situation from occurring, the provision of additional parking to service the downtown area will need to be provided. Parking Supply Alternatives Specific Plan Alternative - The downtown Specific Plan identifies a proposed 295 space parking structure to be located on Jibboom Street. As referenced in the Specific Plan, this would dislocate 58 existing parking spaces, resulting in a net gain of 237 parking spaces. The Specific Plan also identifies the elimination of 64 parking spaces as a result of the creation of the proposed train station park, and the elimination of nine spaces as a result of converting existing angle parking to parallel parking on the south side of Commercial Row. If existing angle parking along Bridge Street between Commercial Row and Jibboom Street were converted to parallel parking, it would result in the elimination of another six spaces. Thus, a net gain of 164 parking spaces is currently planned for the commercial core area, identified as Zone 2. This, however, will serve only 55 percent of the unmet demand of this zone. The remaining 45 percent, or 138 parking spaces, would not be provided. As presented in Figure 24, adjacent Zone 1 is projected to be fully saturated at year 2015 demand levels_ At first Tnickee Downtown Circulation $tudv LSC, Inc. Page 157 glance, it would appear that Zone 3 would be capable of absorbing the additional demand, because there is a ' projected surplus of 1$8 parking spaces at year 2015 parking demand levels. However, nearly all of this surplus supply consists of private parking spaces for land uses such as private residences, the Sierra West Bank, and the church_ Therefore, only approximately 20 percent of this surplus, or 38 parking spaces, would be available as spillover parking to the unmet demand of Zone 2. This still resuits in an unmet demand of 100 parldng spaces for the commercial area north of the railroad tracks. The downtown Specific Plan identifies a proposed 143 space at -grade parking lot on West River Street in the i vicinity of the existing oil storage tanks, and a 172 space parking lot on East Diver Street, to be located between East River Street and the railroad tracks east of Bridge Street. Either of these two lots would be adequate to ' offset the unmet parking demand projected to occur in the commercial district north of the railroad tracks. However, these areas would be less desirable for patrons of the Commercial Row area due to their remote location and physical separation by the railroad tracks. It would be reasonable, however, for employees of businesses on the north side of the tracks to use these spares. Providing attractive pedestrian connections between these parking areas and the Commercial Row area is critical to the useability of either of these planned parking lots. Provision of Fast and West River Street Lots Without the Jibboom Street Parking Structure - This alternative would provide the two previously mentioned at -grade parking lots along East and West River Street, but eliminate construction of the proposed Jibboom Street parking structure. Under this alternative, the existing Jibboom Street at -grade lot would remain. This alternative, as planned, would provide parking ' supply to mitigate the unmet shortfall in Zone 2. This alternative would also be far less expensive to implement than the construction of a new parking garage. The typical cost per parking space of structurd- parking is approxunately $20,000 to $25,000, as opposed to $2,000 to $2,500 for surface IOL. As mentioned ' .,previously, however, this alternative would also place all of the additional parking intended to serve the Commercial Row area on the opposite side of the Southern Pacific Railroad right-of-way. This is an .Y inconvenient parking location, requiring patrons of the Commercial Row area to park on the opposite side of the railroad tracks from the destinations for which they are bound. It should also be pointed out that this alternative would marginally meet year 2015 parking demand levels, but long term (20 year +) parking demand could not be accommodated with this alternative alone. With this alternative, it is suggested that all public parking in analysis Zones 1, 2, and 3 be designated as two- hour parking, and the remote parking areas south of the railroad right-of-way should be free of charge with no time restriction. This will encourage employee parking for the Commercial Row area to occur at the remote ' parking lots, thereby freeing up the most desirable parking for patrons of the Commercial Row area. Provision of Remote Parking with Shuttle or Trolley Service - This alternative would locate additional parking for the Commercial Row area in at -grade parking lots on the Mill Site. The parking. for Mill Site land uses would be designed to provide an excess 300 parking spaces to mitigate the unmet parking demand in the Commercial Row area. Access to and from the Commercial Row area would need to be provided via a parking shuttle or trolley that would operate continuously between the hours of $:00 A.M. and 10:00 P.M., during peak seasons, with a headway of not more than 10 minutes. The shuttle would provide service between the at -grade parking area on the Mill Site and Commercial Row. The shuttle could also be designed to provide access to 2 land uses on the Mill Site as they develop. This plan provides flexibility for both the long term parking needs of the downtown area of Truckee and the development of the Mill Site- Parking could initially be located on the western portion of the Mill Site relatively close to the historic downtown area_ This would also help to foster development of the Mill Site by creating an activity center on the Mill Site. As development of the Mill Site occurs, the land occupied by the relatively inexpensive at -grade parking Iots could be converted to commercial, office and residential uses, with the parlang being moved further to the east. This process could continue as the economic and land use Truckee Downtown Circulation Soudv LSC, Inc. Page 68 1 ' base of the Mill Site develops. Ultimately, this plan could also be tied in with a roadway improvement alternative that provides an additional crossing of the Truckee River and Southern Pacific railroad right-of-way that would serve a major intercept parking lot on the Mill Site. This would help to reduce traffic in the downtown area by providing remote intercept parking that would eliminate some vehicle trips from the downtown area.. This is also beneficial from a public perception standpoint in that it provides one major parking facility, which can be more easily Imarketed and maintained than a series of smaller parking areas. �I 11 J As with the previous alternative, it is suggested that all public parking in Zones 1, 2, and 3 be designated as two-hour parking, and the remote parking areas on the Old Milli Site would be free of charge, without time limitations. This alternative would be less expensive to implement than construction of the parking garage on 3ibboom Street, but more expensive to implement than the provision of bath the East and West River Street Lots. This is because of the ongoing cost of providing shuttle service to and from the remote parking areas, in addition to the parking lot construction and maintenance costs. Summary/Conclusions Any of the above parking alternatives will require a funding source to obtain implementation. By far the most costly alternatives include construction of a parking garage. however, these alternatives also provide parking supply in the closest proximity to the parking demand (Commercial Row). Provision of remote lots with shuttle service has been successfully implemented in other areas similar to Truckee; however, this requires extensive - marketing and ongoing maintenance and operation expendisures , and is not as convenient to visitors. ,With each of the previous alternatives an initial capital outlay would be required to build the proposed parking areas. Additional funding would also be required to finance ongoing maintenance activity, such as snow removal ind pavemant resurfacing. As a means by which to finance the initial capital outlays and ongoing maintenance expenditures, the Town should consider the establishment of a Parking Improvement District (PID) for the construction and maintenance of joint or public parking facilities. Applicants for new development or use Changes could fulfill all or part of the minimum required on-site parking supply by making a one-time only payment to the Town, in an amount to be determined as part of the PID planning process. These dollars would be earmarked for construction of new parking. facilities. In addition, property owners within the PID could be assessed a yearly maintenance fee that would be earmarked for maintenance of shared public parking facilities. An option to this maintenance assessment could be to charge for parking in the public lots. This would have to be carefully studied, however, in terms of the overall parking strategy for the area (i.e. for alternatives that utilize remote parking facilities, it may be counterproductive to establish a fee for parking that discourages rather than encourages their usage). Trwckee Downtown Circulwion Study LSA. Ine- Page 69 Chapter 7 Bicycle/Pedestrian Circulation An improved pedestrian and bicycle system is needed in the downtown area to encourage alternative forms of transportation and to make downtown Truckee a safe and pleasant environment for visitors and locals alike. Sidewalks, on -street bike routes, and off-road paths should be designed and organized into a cohesive circulation network connecting major destinations in the downtown area with the surrounding communities, and minimizing the conflict between users. The pedestrian and bicycle system should receive a high priority for implementation, as it serves both as an alternative mode of transportation and as a recreational amenity. The coordinated pedestrian and bicycle system would help reduce dependance on the automobile, resulting in a reduction in traffic congestion and air pollution. It would also enhance the appeal of downtown as a recreational area Goals and Objectives Goals and objectives have been established by the Town's planning staff to guide development of the integrated downtown pedestrianfbicycle system. These goals and objectives are as follows: Establish an integrated pedestriarAicycle network to create connections between parking areas and pedestrian destinations. Each parking. area should have clearly defined, safe pedestrian access. • Coordinate bicycle planning efforts with the other entities involved in the planning of the regional bikeway system in order to maximize fu►zding opportunities and ensure efficient use of resources. 01 Develop street amenities that will moderate climatic effects for pedestrians. Include concepts for wind sheltering, shade, and snow protection. 0 Pedestrian Activity Existing pedestrian activity is concentrated in the Commercial Row area of the downtown study area, where brick sidewalks and storefront awnings provide a pleasant pedestrian environment_ This, coupled with relatively dense commercial land uses along Commercial Row, encourage pedestrian activity in this area. Pedestrian activity also occurs to the west of Commercial Row, along Donner Pass Road in the Srickeltown area of downtown, as well as along ]ibboom Street, Spring Street, and Church Street. The pedestrian environment along these streets is poorer than along Commercial Row, duce to the absence of sidewalks. Limited pedestrian activity also occurs along East and West River Streets and local residential streets in the historic downtown area. The existing pedestrian network, as shown in Figure 25, includes: ■ a brick sidewalk on the north side of Commercial Row between Bridge Street and Spring Street; a concrete sidewalk on the east side of Bridge Sheet between Danner Pass Road and Church Street; ■ a concrete sidewalk at the corner of West River Street and Bridge Street in front of Andy's Truckee Diner, and ■ a concrete sidewalk on the west side of Bridge Street between West River Street and the Truckee River. few crosswalks are currently provided in the downtown area across Commercial Row and Donner Pass Road. Truckee Downiown Circulation Study L5C1 Inc, .. Page 70 t t t v a Z Truckee Do-,u,wn G;rculati n sn<dv `n Uy 0 ��r ZI CID � ai oZ c ❑ f 2 U 0 � _ U 0 . -3 Z.- c N Co as 3 - y + *y* Ty A, y a L f aF *R■#■R� s , OL x �c r ■ ■ Y W `n Uy 0 ��r CID � ai oZ c � Li C 2 U 0 � L` U fit c Co as iz0 VJ y a L , OL x W LSC. Inc. Page 71 Durina the winter pavement markings for crosswalks at Bridge Street and Spring Street become faded with the constant snow removal activity to a point where the crosswalk is no longer discernable to drivers or pedestrians. The only place in the downtown area along Donner Pass Road and Commercial Row where tragic is forced to stop at an intersection is at the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection. Even at this intersection, northbound Bridge Street traffic is not forced to stop, so northbound left and right turning vehicles that conflict with northbound and southbound pedestrian movements do not stop. This often results in pedestrians being forced to yield the right-of-wa_ to the turning traffic, affording pedestrians limited options to cross Commercial Row or Donner Pass Road without having to cross a moving vehicle stream. This is especially true during afternoon peak demand periods when pedestrian activity coincides with peak hours of vehicular traffic demand. North -south pedestrian activity within .the downtown study area is severely limited by the presence of the Southern Pacific Railroad right-of-way. Currently„ there are no designated pedestrian crossing areas across the railroad right-of-way. Most north -south pedestrian activity across the railroad tracks occurs at the Bridge Street at -grade raillttighway crossing. This crossing is not, however, a designated pedestrian crossing area. Additional north -south pedestrian activity occurs along the railroad right-of-way traveling between West River Street south of the railroad tracks and Commercial Row and Donner Pass Road to the north of the railroad tracks. This creates. a potentially hazardous situation, in that pedestrian activity is occurring within the railroad right -of --way, at random locations along approximately a 1i3 mile length of track. North -south pedestrian activity in the area is also liniited by the presence of the Truckee River. The river presents t a more severe physical barrier to pedestrian activity than the railroad tracks, causing all north -south pedestrian activity to use the bridge at Bridge Street to gain north -south access across the river. A new pedestrianlbicycle bridge will be constructed by the Tahoe City Public Utilities District in 1996, ' approximately 4,000 feet east of Bridge Street. This should be included in any future pedestrian and bicycle planning occurring in that area. I Proposed Sidewalks The following sidewalks have been proposed for downtown Truckee by the Town's planning staff and are shown ' in Figure 25; an at grade Spring Street pedestrian mall which would extend from Spring Street south across the railroad tracks to West River Street ■ a sidewalk on bath sides of Jibboom Street between Spring Street and Bridge Street; a sidewalk on the west side of Bridge Street between Jibboom Street and Commercial Row; ' a sidewalk on the east side of Bridge Street between Jibboom Street and Church Street; a sidewalk on both sides of Church Street between Bridge Street and Donner Pass Road; ■ a sidewalk on the north side of Donner Pass Road between Spring Street and the Interstate 80/High , Street interchange; a sidewalk on the south side of Donner Pass Road between Bridge Street and the Interstate 80/High Street interchange, with a brick sidewalk between the east side of the Intermodal Center and Bridge ' Street; a sidewalk on the north side of Donner Pass Road between Bridge Street and Trout Creek Road; ■ a brick sidewalk on the north side of West River Street between Bridge Street and the Taco Station; ' ■ a sidewalk on the south side of West River Street between Bridge Street and Riverside Drive, with brick paving between Bridge Street and the Taco Station; ■ a sidewalk on the west side of Bridge Street between Commercial Row and West River Street; a pedestrian crossing across the railroad tracks from Commercial Row to West River Street directly Truckee Downtown Circulation Study L$C. Inc.. Page 72 1 ' across from Spring Street, This proposed pedestrian network connects all major commercial centers in downtown Truckee and includes Sidewalks that connect Commercial Row to the proposed Mill Site development. Sidewalks on West River Street would also encourage fixture clean up and development between Bridge Street and Riverside Avenue. Bicycle Activity Bicycle usage has witnessed a steady increase in the past ten years with the development of mountain bikes. The natural beauty and abundant bike trails have made Truckee and the Tahoe Basin popular destinations between May and October for mountain and road cyclists. A bike trail surrounding Lake Tahoe has been a top priority for the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency. Truckee is also involved in the developing of the Nevada County Bicycling Master Plan. lBicycle activity in the downtown area is Limited by many of the same physical barriers as pedestrian activity. The presence of the Southem Pacific Railroad right -0f -way forces north -south bicycle activity in the downtown study area to occur at the Bridge Street railhrighway crossing. The lack of designated bicycle lanes in the downtown study area forces potential cyclists to mix with vehicular traffic along existing streets. To access the downtown area from the south, cyclists must use the Truckee River crossing located on State Route 267. The major deficiency of the existing bikeway network is that it does not farm a comprehensive system of facilities adequately serving the entire town. Considering the network as a whole, the following deficiencies and limitations are apparent: ■ The current system does not provide a safe route through downtown; There is a lack of bike routes and bike parking in the downtown area and the surrounding neighborhoods; ' ■ The downtown area is currently not connected to any regional bicycle paths or trail systems, ■ Adverse weather (snow and rain) occurring predominantly during the winter also limits the viability of bicycle transportation in the downtown area. Bicycle Plan A comprehensive and cost-effective bicycle facilities network would provide a wide range of benefits for the residents of the Town of Truckee, Developing a bicycle system establishes a greater validity for bicycles as a node of transportation. By providing cyclists with safe and direct routes to work, shopping, and school, traffic pressures and the associated congestion and air quality impacts can be eased. In addition, a complete bicycle network will provide an important new recreational attribute for both residents and visitors. As such, it can serve as an economic benefit to the cornmunity, as well as a convenient and enjoyable amenity. Along with the improvements in the road network, the Town of Truckee should also provide a safe and convenient bicycle network that will be able to grow along with the Town. Figure 26 presents recommended corridors for the planning of bicycle facilities. The plan presented below was developed to address all of the community's bicycling needs. The differing requirements of commuters, recreationalists, racers, adults, and children were balanced to develop a network that provides substantial benefits to all. This network entails the development of all three types of bicycle facilities: ■ Off-street bicycle paths (otherwise known as "Class I" facilides) are provided largely for recreational cycling. The path proposed along the Truckee River corridor is designed to provide an aesthetic and safe route on the south side of the Truckee River, providing access to the proposed park west of South River Truckee Do-rVown Circulation Study LSC, Inc. _ _ _ Page 73 �r Truckee Downtown Circularion 5uudv LSC, Inc. Page 74 ■ Street and the Truckee River. ■ Cm -street bicycle lanes (Class II facilities) are planned to be striped along relatively low-volume roads ■ that provide good continuity through the community. They are designed to provide convenient and direct routes between major activity centers, and will serve to increase driver's awareness of cyclists on corridors with relatively high bicycle use. ■ Ftnaiiy, bicycle routes (Class III facilities) are planned to guide cyclists towards preferred routes and away from potentially hazardous areas. These routes are indicated with signage. They are designed to provide connections into each residential area and to the Class I and Class II bicycle facilities, for use by both recreational and commuting cyclists. Proposed Bike Paths, Lanes, and Routes The following bike paths and lanes were proposed in the Downtown Truckee Vision Plan. a bicycle path on the south side of the Truckee River from State Route 89 to South River Street; ■ a bicycle lane on the south side of West River Street between Riverside Drive and State Route 89; ■ a bicycle lane on the north side of West River Street between Bridge Street and Riverside Drive; ■ a bicycle lane on the west side of Bridge Street from South River Street to Jibboom Street; I ■ a bicycle lane on the east side of Bridge Street Brom Jibboom Street to north of the Interstate 80 overpass; a bicycle lane on the south side of Donner Pass Road from the Interstate 80/High Street Interchange to Bridge Street; ■ a bicycle lane on the north side of East River Street; ■ a bicycle lane on the south side of the Truckee River east of East River Street; a bicycle lane on the north side of Donner Pass Road from Bridge Street to the Interstate 80/State Route 267 interchange; ■ a bicycle lane through the Mill Site from Donner Pass Road to Glenshire Drive; and ' ■ a bicycle lane crossing the railroad tracks between West River Street and Commercial Row directly across from Spring Street. In addition to the bike paths and lanes mentioned above, a number of other improvements are suggested_ • The proposed Class 1 bicycle facility below the Western Underpass should be continued along the south side of Donner Pass Road to the Spring Street intersection. This may require a streetscape with parallel parking instead of angle parking along Donner Pass Road in this area. ' ■ A Class 2 bike lane along Spring Street and Jibboom Street from Donner Pass Road to Bridge Street. This bike lane would serve as east -west bicycle traffic through downtown and would limit the amount of bike traffic on Commercial Row. ■ A bike path connecting the proposed Truckee Diver corridor bike path with the Hilltop area providing access to bicycle trails to the south. Commuters and recreationists from the Ponderosa Palisades and Sierra Meadows areas would be able to use this facility. ■ A bike lane on State Route 267/State Route 89 North, north of Jibboom Street to the Prosser Dam. This would encourage commuting from the Prosser Heights subdivision and would serve mountain bikers who live downtown. Truckee Downtown Circulation Srudv LSC. Inc. Page 75 A bike path connecting the third Tahoe -Donner connection (Bridge Street), located north of Interstate 80, to Donner Pass Road near the proposed Gateway East project. This path would reduce bicycle traffic along Donner Pass Road between Bridge Street and Levone Avenue, and provide cyclists with a convenient route between Truckee's two major commercial centers that avoids the congestion along Donner Pass Road and Commercial Row. Marketing/Promotion To market and promote usage of the planned bicycle network, a clear and comprehensive bicycle map of the town and its surrounding areas should be developed and distributed. A bicycle map is an important element that promotes cycling and makes citizens aware of the opportunities provided by the town. A bicycle map is useful in highlighting points of interest, bicycle shops, and ski areas that offer bike trails. While map content varies, there are a few items that should be included on every map: - Title and words like "Bike Map" prominently displayed on the cover; Legend, scale of miles and north arrow; Date of publication and nameiaddress of map producer; - Locational map showing how the map relates to a larger area such as the Tahoe Basin or Nevada County; - A description of how to use the map, fully describing any suitability rating system which is used; and - A section on traffic laws and safety information, as well as a "qualifying," statement regarding who the map is intended to serve, and a disclaimer noting explicitly that the map producer make no claims regarding the absolute "safety" of cycling on any street or highway. The Town's planning staff also recommended the following design and marketing factors: Clear sidewalks of snow in the winter. ■ Make all pedestrian routes accessible for the mobility -impaired. Sidewalk grades and ramps should be designed to comply with current ADA guidelines. ■ lnstall bike racks at key destination points, including parking lots and transit stops. r Clearly identify bike/pedestrian paths in the downtown area with a uniform sign design. ■ Promote the use of the bike/pedestrian path system through publications and printed guide maps. In carder to reduce the real and the perceived threat to pedestrians and bicycles from autos, employ traffic calming methods where feasible and appropriate. Use of different pavement materials to signify to motorists that they have entered a pedestrian or bicycle precinct. ■ Narrowing the roadway width or use of chicanes and choke downs. ■ Formal pedestrian crossings with traffic control. ■ Traffic circles. Landscaped medians. Create a pedestrian sidewalk through Commercial Row sir pedestrians can have easy access from the parking structure on 7ibboom Street to the front of Commercial Row. Summary/Conclusions The beautiful mcxmtains and numerous off-road trails have made Truckee a destination for many bicyclists and h&m. The vast network of off-road trails and on -road trails in the Tahoe Basin must now be connected with a comprehensive pedestfian/bicycie network linking downtown Truckee with surrounding neighborhoods. With Truckee downtown Circulation Studv _ LSC, Inc. Page 76 t 1 11 I the proposed roadway improvements, now is an opportune time for planning construction and delineation of this pedestriantbicycle network From our observations, and discussion with the Town's planning staff, it was concluded that: ■ A north/south axis that connects neighborhoods south of the Truckee River with neighborhoods north iof the State Route 267/Interstate 80 interchange should be planned_ ■ An cast/west axis linking State Route 89 with the proposed Western Underpass should be planned. Ultimately, this access should be the Truckee River corridor Class I bicycle lane. Prior to construction of this facility, the provision of a Class Il bicycle lane should be considered along West River Street. ' ► Bicycle racks should be provided near existing and proposed commercial areas, as well as in or near parking areas. ► A safe north -south crossing for cyclists and pedestrians across the railroad tracks is needed. An at -grade crossing has been proposed at Spring Street and also on Bridge Street. Long term consideration should be given to providing a grade separated bicyclelpedestrian crossing at the Spring Street crossing location. I u u t t L1 ► As mentioned above, a bicycle path on the south side of the Truckee River from State Route 89 to South River Street would be a desirable amenity. A connection from this facility across the Truckee River in the vicinity of the Western Underpass should also be planned. This connection should be a combined bicycle/pedestrian bridge in the vicinity of the industriallretail land uses in this area, and should provide the most direct access possible to the proposed Western underpass. The bicycle link planned along West River Street between the Western Underpass and Bridge Street .should be considered for elimination. Existing public right-of-way through this area is limited and poses a problem to providing a continuous connection between Bridge Street and the Westem Underpass. Elimination of this link from the planned bicycle network should be considered along with designating ,the link between the Western Underpass and Donner Pass Road on the north side of the railroad tracks las the preferred east -west ,route into the downtown area should be pursued. The elimination of planned Class II bicycle routes through Commercial Row between Bridge Street and Spring Street should be considered, while bicycling on -street should not be allowed. Bicyclists should not be mmuraged by the provision of bike lanes to use Commercial Row, due to the high level of conflict with parking maneuvers and pedestrians, Tibboorn Street should be planned as the major east -west connection through this portion of the study corridor. An option could be to provide a Class I facility through the proposed train station park and along the railroad tracks on the south side of Cornmercial Row between Spring Street and Bridge Street - Construction of a Class I facility connecting the Bridge Street Interstate underpass to Donner Pass Road in the vicinity of the proposed Gateway East project should be pursued. There is an existing graded trail in this area that could be used as a possible alignment. In general, a safe and coordinated pedestrian/bicycle network will help ease congestion downtown and snake the Town of Truckee a more livable community_ 1Tre kee Downtown Circulation Study LSC. Inc. Page 77 � APPENDIX B � MAPF PC -2 INITIATIVE TRAFFIC ANALYSIS r 'J 1 J 1 i TRANS ORTATION PLANNING & TRAFFIC EICINEERING CONSULTANTS 2694 Lake Forest Road PO Box 5815 Tahoe City, CA 94145 91615834453 FAX: 9161333-5%6 TECHNICAL. MEMORANDUM DATE: June 13, 1997 TO: Elizabeth Eddins, Director of Planning, Town of Truckcc FROM: Daniel P. Wilkins, P.E. DRAFT SUBJECT: MAPF PC -2 Initiative Traffic Analysis INTROD UCTIONISUMMARY As requested, LSC, Inc. has performed a traffic analysis of the proposed Mountain Area Preservation Foundation (MAPF) initiative which would restrict commercial and office development on the Hopkins Property (also known as PC -2). The focus of this analysis has been to identify potential transportation impacts of the initiative on the Gateway Center area, and more specifically on Donner Pass Road between State Route 89 and the west Daniter Pass Road interchange with Interstate $0. Additionally, traffic volumes at the Bridge Street/Commercial Row and Prosser Darn RoadlState Route 89 intersections were identified. Figure 1 presents the study area for this analysis, as well as intersections which were evaluated as a part of this study. In order to perform this analysis, the Truckee Transportation Model was used to identify traffic volumes at each of the study area intersections assuming current 20 year development plans, as well as 20 year development plans assuming the MAPF Initiative to be in place. Resulting traffic volumes were than compared to idezitify the percentage change that the MAPF Initiative would have ' on traffic volumes on area roadways, The magnitude of change in traffic volumes was then identified and is presented.. in Figure 2. As shown, the MAPF initiative is projected to have a minimal impact on traffic volumes within the study area. This is due to the fact that the level of commercial and oftice development assumed to occur in K-2 without the initiative represents a small proportion (less than 2 percent) of total Year 2015 land use in the Town of Truckee. i iEd wt36t :0T z65ti Ft .unr 9966€BS9i6 : '1 its 3NCIHd aotiei D5-1 : woo i2 MAPF Initiative Traffic Analysis Page 2 June 13, 1997 ' TRAFFIC ANALYSIS Land Use As mentioned previously, the Town of 'Truckee Transportation Model was used to identify Year 2015 traffic volumes both with and without the MAFF Initiative. This .:omputer model was originally developed by Pactrans, Inc. for the Town of Truckee in 1495, and has since been updated by LSC, Inc:. to reflect plan changes, such as the Downtown Specific Plan. The first step in this process was to identify planned Year 2015 land use in the Town of Truckee both with and without the initiative in effect. To identify these land uses, Year 2015 land use projections prepared for the Town of Truckee as a portion of the Downtown Specific Plant were obtained. Table 1 presents a comparison of Existing, Year 2015, and General Plan land use quantities assuined for the entire Town of 'fruckee, as per the Downtown Specific Plait. Tante 1: Town of Truckee Existing and Projected Land Use Quantities Analysis Year Employment Land Use (Number of Employees) Residential Land Use (Number Dwelling Units) Existing Conditions . 5,225 9,039 Year 2015 8,109 13,271 General Plan 12,460 17,850 Sourcc. Downtown Truckee Transportation Study Technical Appendix Volume t of 2 As shown in Table 1, total Year 2015 employment in the Town of Truckee is estimated to be 8,104 employees. Total Year 2015 residential development in the Town of Truckee is estimated to be 13,271 dwelling units. This represents an increase in employment of 2,984 employees or 55 percent over existing conditions, and an increase in residential develvprnent of 4,232 residential units or 47 percent over existing conditions. To develop land use assuming the PC -2 initiative to be in effect, Town of Truckee planning staff identified the quantity of development allowed on the PC -2 property under the General Plan, as well as that currently assumed to occur on the PC -2 property by the Year 2015 absent the MAPF Initiative. This analysis indicated that the General Plan allows up to 175,000 square feet of combined commercial and office development on the PC -2 property, as well as development of a resort hotel of up to 300 rooms for lodging and conference uses. Year 2015 estimates for the PC -2 property (absent the MAPF Initiative) indicate an estimated 93,000 square feet of combined commercial/office f' 1 1 1 1 t 2:d WdOZ:01 L661 FT unr 996SE8S9T6 : -&I 3NCIHd ao4p1 DSS : !.i❑a1 MAPF Joitiative Traffic Analysis Page 3 June 13, 1997 development, and development oN50 resort hotel rooms (as the site is not assumed to be fully developed by 2015 in the "non -initiative" land use projections). In order to provide a basis of comparison of how these land use quantities compare to land use quantities in the remainder o£ town,, the number of employees that would be required to sdrvice'these levels of development was determined. This indicated that 153 commercialfoffsce employees and 161 resort./hotel employees would be required to service this level of development, for a total ei4loymerit of 314 during the Year 2415. Compared against the totals presented above, this represents 3,$'percent of total employment in the town as a whole in the Year 2015. To develop land use quantities assuming the MAPF initiative in place, Town of Truckee staff assumed the following. ► Commercialloffice development on the PC -2 property would be limited to the maximum of 25,0001 square feet allowed tinder the initiative' tThe resort hotel development would not occur, as per the initiative. ► The commercial and office land uses which had Previously been assuml ed to occur on the PC - 2 property would be relocated to other parts of town that could accommodate this level of development under the General Plan. It was projected that the majority of the commercial development that would be displaced by the initiative would relocate to the Teichert property, also known as PC -1, near the westernmost 1-80 interchange. It was assumed that the -majority of the office space would be displaced by the initiative would be relocated to the Mate Route 257 corridor south of downtown. I ► --The resort hotel uses would not be relocated, as'there is not ari adequate alternate: site to ' develop this type of use other than those already projected for`this type of development in the 20 Year time frame. These assumptions were based upon the availability of adequate land parcels in various portions of the community. Trip Generation After completing land use projections both with and without the MAPF Initiative, traffic generation forecasts or the Town as a whole (including the PC -2 property) were estimated using the Truckee Transportation Model. Traffic generation rages in the Model have been calibrated against observed ' traffic volumes on the Truckee roadway system, and are slightly lower than national averages. These forecasts indicated that peak hour traffic generation from the PC -2 property would be 175 vehicle trips per hour lower during afternoon peau demand periods assuming the MAPF Initiative to be in effect. When compared to total town wide peak hour traffic generation of 20,155 vehicle trips, this represents 0.9 percent of total town wide traffic during peak demand periods.' 1 Pd Wdi2:01 2661 FT -urlf 996SEBS916 : 'ON 3NC1Hd afl`iel 951 : W©aJ MAPF Initiative Traffic Analysis Page 4 June 13, 1997 As an independent check on the traffic generation estimates for the PC -2 property, trip generation estirnates were prepared using the Insti-tute of Transportation Engineers Trip Generation Manual (Fifth Edition). Trip generation estimates were prepared based upon the net change in land use which is expected to occur with the MAPF Initiative. Table 2 presents estimated trip generation using these nationally published trip generation estimates. Table Z: PC -2 Trip Generation {as per ITE Trip ip Generation Manual} Land Ilse Type Quantity units Trip Generation Rate (1 -Way . Trips per Unit) P.M. peak hour trip generation Commercial/ Shopping Center 24 1,000 Sq, Feet 8.27 199 Office 44 1,000 Sq. Feet 1.87 82 Resort Hotel 150 Rooms 0.67 100 Total 381, As shown, trip generation estimates assuming the nationally published trip generation rates result in a total estimated P.M. peak hour trip generation of 391' vehicle trips, as opposed to the 175 P.M. peak hour trips estimated by the transportation demand model. The cause ofthis discrepancy is due to two factors. The first is that the Truckee TransportationDemand Model is calibrated to P.M. peak hour demand conditions for the Town of Truckcc, as opposed to national averages. In this instance, the trip generation estimates contained in the traffic model indicate that the land uses projected on PC -2 would generate traffic at a lower. rate than the national averages. The second reason for the discrepancy is that the estimates based upon national averages do not account for the presence of linked trips that would occur within the PC -2 properties as a result of the'mixed office and commercial uses. E If the trip generation based upon national averages were assumed instead of the trig generation identified in the traffic model, this would result in the MAPF initiative reducing 381 P.M. peak hour vehicle trips to and from the PC -2 property, which would represent 1.9 percent of total P.M. peak hour trip generation in the Town as a whole. In general, however, this comparison reinforces the conclusion that the overall traffic generation impact of the initiative would be relatively low. Traffic Distribution After determining net trip generation changes that would result frorn the MAPF Initiative, traffic volume estimates were developed at each of the study area intersections for Year 2015 both with and without the initiative in effect, using the Town of Truckee Model. Resulting traffic volumes were than compared, to determine the net effect that the initiative would have on traffic volumes at the study area intersections. This analysis incorporated the assumption that additional access to Tahoe - Danner would be provided by new roads connecting with Bridge Street and Alder Drive_ 1 1 1 1 Sa WIjTZ!;OT Z661 Zr -unf 996SL8S9% : 714 EINCIN:4 304pi 3S1 : WA ' MAPF Initiative Traffic Analysis Page 5 June 13, 1997 ' Figure 2 presents the net percentage change in traffic volumes as a result of the MAPF Initiative. As shown in Figure 2, traffic volumes along Donner Pass Road are estimated to increase by 2.0 to 2.5 percent with the initiative in place, This is predominately caused by the fact that the commercial ' development that would be restricted on PC -2 is expected to instead develop on the PC -I parcel which is accessed by Cold Stream Road and Bonner Pass Road. This is'evidenced by the fact that estimated traffic volumes on Cold Stream Road increase by 13 percent with the initiative. It should also be noted that an increase of 8 percent in traffic volume was observed on the north approach of the Statc Route 89/Domier Bass Road intersection. This is likely due to increased usage ' of the Gateway Center comn-icrcial areas with the MAPF Initiative. All other roadways and intersection approaches within the study area are forecast to experience a change in traffic volume of ' 1 percent or less with the MAPF Initiative. Conclusions ' The MAPF initiative would relocate approximately 3.13 percent of the projected town wide Year 2015 land use (as measured by employment). All Year 2015 residential land use would ' remain. unchanged. ' - • The MAPF initiative would reduce estimated Year 2015 PM. peak hour traffic volumes to tand from the PC -2 property by approximately 175 vehicle trips. This amounts to 0.9 percent .of total town wide peals hour traffic generation. • Because the percentage of total town wide traffic which is affected by the MAPF Initiative is .relatively low (less than 1 percent), the initiative does not materially impact traffic operations ,along Donner Pass Road between State Route 89 and the West Danner Pass Road ' interchange. The forecast change in traffic volume is well within the day-to-day variation in actual traffic counts, and can therefore be considered to be statistically insignificant. - Analysis of traffic volumes at the Bridge Street/Coinmercial Row intersection in Downtown Truckee both with and without the MAPF Initiative in place indicate that traffic volumes at this intersection are not materially affected by the MAPF Initiative. As this intersection is a very effective "barometer" of traffic conditions in the Downtown area as a whole, it can be concluded that the findings of the downtown specific planning process would not be materially affected by the initiative. • This conclusion is driven in part by the assumption that much of the commercial land use twould instead occur on the FC -1 parcel. As a result of this assumption, traffic is increased in the West Interchange area near PC -I (though not significantly). if instead it were assumed ' that this commercial land use were to relocate to the Gateway Center area, a more substantial impact impact would occur on the segment of Donner Pass Road between Northwoods Boulevard and the Tahoe Forest Hospital (where traffic volumes are closer to the existing ' capacity). 1 9d !. dEE :0T 2-55i ET 'unf 99GS�-8S9T5 : 'DPS 9NUHd aoNpl OSI : td01�1-� MAPF In=itiative Traffic Analysis Page 5 June 13, 1997 ' • Based upon the forecasted change in traffic volumes in the area, it can further he concluded that the MAPF Initiative would have no substantive impact on the relative need for extenstion of Deerfield Drive to serve the PC -1 parcel. • It should be pointed out that the purpose of this analysis was to identify potential town wide impacts that the MAPF initiative could generate.. Slaecific site access issues and traffic impact analysis of intcrsections immediately adjacent to the PC -2 property has not been performed in detail. However, dine to the fact that land use within PC -2 is being reduced, it can be assumed that a corresponding reduction in Year 2015 traffic volumes would occur in and around the immediate vicinity of the PC -2 property. We trust that this analysis is helpful in evaluating the ramifications associated with the MAPF Initiative. We would be happy to address any questions or concerns you or others may have regarding our methodology or conclusions. Thank you for this opportunity to assist the Town of Truckee. Ld WOZZ:01 4661 el 'unf : 'ON r]NC]Hd c3OWPj 7S7 Woad FROM : LSC Tahoe PHONE NO. : 9165835956 Jun. 12 1997 10:23AM P8 I lei j� Ln ........... m rn PHONE NO. : 9165835956 Jun. 12 1997 10:23AM P8 I 5. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I lei j� ........... FT k ki I ..... -, ..... .. ........ ......... Z rpi 8 5. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I lei I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I rrr W Z 0 a 0 -- --------- -_------. fes. �'l r + Vr r ti„ r _ _{ N W -- --------- -_------. A. a_ ' + + Vr ti„ � -16 6d Wuve:OT 266T ET 9SGSL8S916 : 'Ora dhlOHd aaypi D5-1 : wpl�jI j W CLN4 I 6d Wuve:OT 266T ET 9SGSL8S916 : 'Ora dhlOHd aaypi D5-1 : wpl�jI � APPENDIX C 1 � RESPONSES TO THE NOTII:'E OF PREPARA.TION r- 1 F DEPARTMENT Of THE A� KT �YciNQ NEFcR Di. TRICT, RI NIQ CORPS 4F ENG NEE i , 1K,► r;= 1325 J STREET 0s SACRAOT0, CALJFORNiA 9W 02 OFFICIAL Ii6ZIWESS Mr, Brad. Wall Town of Truckee Community Development Department Planning Division RECEIVED 11570 Donner Pass Road Truckee, CA 96161 N O V 2 Q 1995. TOWN OF TRUCKEE COMMUNITY DEVELOP'Ma f DEPT. TROUT Sea ratum address on reverse. DATE WRITER'S NAME/TELEPHONE NO. Merritt Rice (916) 557-6761 ® YOUR 0 OUR COMMUNICATION (Kind, felafa ca symbol, dAte, eulgect, Or®Mar idanrlfl CatiOn) Notice of Preparation/Downtown Study Area Sppecific Plan Environmental Impact Re art, dated October 3D, 1995. , V ACTION TAKEN OR REQUESTED - ' Q REPLY WILL BE FURNISHEO ON OR. ABOUT ® RECEIPT ACKNO WLEDG[O a AEQUEST DATE WHEN REPLY MAY BE EXPECTED FOR DIRECT REPLY =WE MAYE SENT YOUR COMMUNICATION TO(See aielos) Q Tp OBTAIN INFORMATION We have reviewed the notice, and the proposed project will not conflict with any project or other programs within our jurisdiction. ® 0 T EA INFORMATION SUPPLIED OR =) REQUESTED Thank you for coordinating with us. TY PEO NAME, GRACE. AND TITLE SIGNATURE R YEP Chief, Planning Division d-'. r/�y,�/f3 ..n rumour 4%ff. i Jan IV KtrLAbtS LIMON OF o U.S. GPO: 1988-20142a/BD327 1 NOV 56, WHICH WILL BE USED. DELAY, REFERRAL. OR FOLLOW-UP NOTICE (AR 340.13) Brad Wall, Planning Intem Community Development Department Town of Truckee 11570 Dormer Pass Road Truckee, CA 96161 TRUCKEE-DONNER HISTORICAL SOCIETY, INC. RE: Downtown Specific Plan Draft EIR {Comments Dear Brad: P.Q. BOX 903 TRUCKEE. CA 98160 (810) 882.0893 January 31, 1996 On behalf of the Historical Society, I wish to thank you for participating in the scoping session you conducted with our Board of Directors and other interested parties regarding the Society's concerns about the Downtown Specific Plan. The Society's main objective is to preserve and protect the community's historical integrity. This area covers more than the historic structures, but also includes historic sites and the general ambience of the Downtown Historic District. Our primary concern and objection is the proposed Jibboom Street parking structure which would require the demolition or relocation of two historic buildings. The Society feels very strongly about the further loss of historic structures just for the sake of development or redevelopment plans. The draw for the vast majority of visitors to the Historic District is the variety of historic structures that currently exist. The public wants to see an old west town, not some duplication. This objection also applies to the proposed demolition of existing railroad structures, i.e., the southeast corner of East Diver Street and Bridge Street; the existing gas station at Spring Street; the warehouse structures behind Pat & 011ie's Sierra Superstop on West River Street, and also the Cal -Nevada facility on the comer of Bridge and Commercial Row. This objection applies to any and all proposed demolition within the current boundaries of the HP District whether or not they are specifically mentioned herein. Brad Wall, Planning Intern ' Community Development Department Town of Truckee January 31, 1996 Page 2 1 2. The Society expresses another objection of the proposed round -about for the main ' downtown intersection as we fear necessary demolition of surrounding structures to accommodate this proposal_ S. The last area of concern is the probability that this dream plan will never 3. The Society is concerned about development at the end of South River Street and ' that the location of Truckee's last ice palace will be negatively impacted. The Society requests that this parcel be designated open space or that a reconstruction ' could be accomplished that would go well with proposed reconstruction of the early day ski lift operation at Hilltop. The Society can provide the Town with photographs of both areas for consideration. ' 4. Another area of concern is the proposed development of the former Louisana Pacific mill site. It is the Society's position that the proposed development in this ' t area will negatively impact the existing architectural period downtown and that this area is not included in the current boundaries of the HPAC District. S. The last area of concern is the probability that this dream plan will never materialize. It is the general opinion of the Society that time and financial ' consideration should be given to improving the existing historic inventory (both residential and commercial) rather than dedicating time, effort, and funds to creating a "historical -themed Disneyland". Another suggestion is that the Town immediately contact and work closely with the State Office of Historic Preservation and investigate the merits of placing Truckee in the Main Street Program. Thank you once again for soliciting our comments on this plan. The Society shall continue to monitor the progress of this plan and provide input as necessary. Sincerely, Jim Smith, President cc: TDHS Board of Directors r t Quality ir" = on for Ail ✓ll:tuam" Tahoe Truckee. IJnif iec� School District ' Vincent C. Deveney, Superintendent Jim Abbott, Assistant Superintendent November 30, 1995 RECEIVED Brad Wall, Staff Planner Town of Truckee r 18 1��5 Community Development Dept.. P.O, Bax 2882 TOWN OF �I "s��:�KFE Truckee, Ca 96160'"�M1111Y �E�I£l_�J+~itvi E°, RE: RESPONSE TO NOTICE OF PREPARATION - DOWNTOWN STUDY AREA Dear Brad, Thank you for the opportunity to respond to the Notice of Preparation of an EIR on the Town's "Downtown Study Area" Specific Plan. The information indicates you ` anticipate approximately 680 future residential units at a mix of 80°% multi -family and 20% single family. That equates to 136 Single Family Units and 544 Multi - Family Units. At least 150 multi -family units are planned in the "Hilltop" area and ' 200 multi -family units are planned in the "Old Mill Site" area, for a total of 350 of the 544 anticipated MF units. The District also estimates that 70'% of new development is full-time residences and 30% are partial -time (rentals, second homes) housing units. Based on 680 new residential units the following projections are made. It is anticipated that 140 new K-12 §wdents will be generated from this development at a facility cost to the District of $2,581.310. If developer fees are collected at $1.72/square foot, it is estimated that $1,309.952 in developer fees would be collected. Therefore, leaving the District with a facility_ shortfall of $1_,819,710. (refer to calculations below) ' Student Yield Rates 70% of 136 SF units = 95 units @ .518 SYR/single-family full-time residences 30°% of 136 SF units = 41 units @ .270 SYR/single-family part-time residences 70% of 544 MF units = 381 units @ ,154 SYR/multi-family full-time residences 30°% of 544 MF units = 163 units @ .068 SYR/multi-family part-time residences I BOARD OF TRUSTEES: Debra Darby, Cliff Hartwell, Nancy O'Neill. Jim Wallis, John Wojcik ' 11839 Donner Pass Road, Truckee, Ca 96161 (916) 582-7600 An Equal Opportunity Employer Page Two ' November 30, 1995 Downtown Truckee Study Area 381 Multi -Family Units (full-time) x .154 SjUdent Yleld Rate K-12 59 New K-12 Students 163 Multi -Family Units (part-time) ' x .068 Student Yield Rate K-12 = 11 New K-12 Students TOTAL NUMBER OF NEW K-12 STUDENTS GENERATED = 140 Cost Per Student K-5 @ $17,990 per student x 69 (49% of 140 students) = $1,241,310 6-8 @ $17,500 per student x 32 (23% of 140 students) = 560,000 9-12 @ $20,000 per student x 39 (28%a of 140 students)_ _ 780,000 Total Cost = $2,581,310 Facility Shortfall $2,581,310 Total Facility Cost for Students 1.309,952 Dev. Fees on 680 unit @ 761,600 sq.ft. x $1.72* $1,271,358 FACILITY SHORTFALL 136 SF units @ 2,000 average square feet per hams = 272,000 chargeable sq.ft. 544 MF units @ 900 average square feet per unit = 489,600 chargeable sq.ft. Total Chargeable Square Feet = 761,600 1 11 nGenerated, 5tude is 95 Single Family Units (full-time) x .618 Student Yield Rate (K-12) = 59 New K-12 Students 41 Single Family Units (part-time) x .270 Student Yield Rate (K-1 21 = 11 New K-12 Students 381 Multi -Family Units (full-time) x .154 SjUdent Yleld Rate K-12 59 New K-12 Students 163 Multi -Family Units (part-time) ' x .068 Student Yield Rate K-12 = 11 New K-12 Students TOTAL NUMBER OF NEW K-12 STUDENTS GENERATED = 140 Cost Per Student K-5 @ $17,990 per student x 69 (49% of 140 students) = $1,241,310 6-8 @ $17,500 per student x 32 (23% of 140 students) = 560,000 9-12 @ $20,000 per student x 39 (28%a of 140 students)_ _ 780,000 Total Cost = $2,581,310 Facility Shortfall $2,581,310 Total Facility Cost for Students 1.309,952 Dev. Fees on 680 unit @ 761,600 sq.ft. x $1.72* $1,271,358 FACILITY SHORTFALL 136 SF units @ 2,000 average square feet per hams = 272,000 chargeable sq.ft. 544 MF units @ 900 average square feet per unit = 489,600 chargeable sq.ft. Total Chargeable Square Feet = 761,600 1 11 r Page Three November 30, 1995 ' Downtown Truckee Study Area a The School District is currently operating at '107 to of capacity in the Truckee area ' (refer to attached capacity table). State funding is very limited or not available at all in most cases as no State bond measures have been approved by California voters. Although the District is or will pursue any available State funds for school construction, the chances of receiving any funds when needed are not good. Because of new development impacts on the District, the Tahoe -Truckee Unified School District Board adopted ()n September 1990) the District -wide use of a "Mutual Benefit School Impact Fee Agreement" to generate additional funds needed to house students. This agreement, between the developer and the ' District, states that the developer (instead of paying a $1.72 per square foot of accessible space on residential development only) agrees to pay an increased per square footage fee to offset or mitigate his/her residential development project. The District's 1995-1998 Fiscal Year Impact Fee is $2.83 per square foot of assessable space. No developer fees are collected by the District until the building permits phase of the development. Clearly the District is impacted and would not be able to provide service/adequate housing to future students generated by development in the Downtown Truckee Study Area without some form of mitigation by new residential development. Therefore, the District requests that a condition of approval be imposed on new and future residential development that will require a project to participate in the District's financing/mitigation program and/or to obtain a "Will -Serve Letter" from the District. I have also included for your review, a copy of a September 1995 School District "Impact Fee Analysis for Town of Truckee". If you have any questions, I can be reached in Auburn at the Placer County Office of Education at (918) 887-0553. Sincerely, DENISE •DD Planning Analyst 11 Page Pour November 30, 1995 Downtown Truckee Study Area cc: Vincent Deveney Superintendent Tahoe Truckee Unified School District Tony Hesch Director of School Facilities Tahoe Truckee Unified School District Jim Bush Director of Facility Planning Placer County Office of Education Tahoe -Truckee Unified School District (K-12) Enro Wnentf Capacity Enrollment on 9115195 SCHOOL Existing Enrollment* State Capacity" Percent (%) -ity Kings Beach Elem. (K-5) 483 482 100% Tahoe Lake (K-3) 396 400 99% Rideout (4-5) 194 215 90% North Tahoe Middle (6-8) 505 540 94% North Tahoe High (9-12) 445 850 52% Sierra Mtn. Middle (6-8) 616 447 139% Truckee Elementary (K-5) 893 627 139% Glenshire Eleni. (K-5) 443 428 104% Donner Trail Elem. (K-5) 28 62 45% Tahoe -Truckee High (9-12) 660 904 73% Sierra Continuation High 40 30 133% Cold Stream Alternative 43 TOTAL 4,746 4,557 104% " JJ&wd on enrollment for Y±1]193, 13ay ;wine lceport * Based on State Standards # UNHOUSED STUDENTS = 189 Truckee Area Capacity School Enrollment Capacity AREA CAPACITY Truckee Eleni. K-5 893 627 Glenshire Elem. K-5 443 428 Sierra Mtn. Middle 4-6 616 447 Tahoe -Truckee High 9-12 660 904 Donner Trail K-5 28 62 11 TOTAL 2,644 2,408 107% Prepared 9195 LlEi,- I ­ p5 FF:I 15:42" r=T I1I:1-:T ­ PLHNf11NG 7 41c=3r. F . e I TAr'E OF CAL1FOAN1A.8USWESS, TAANSPORTATON AND NC€ SNG ArSAXY PETF WILSON. 3EPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LiTRICT 7 .o. sax 911 w tARYSALF.CA VACi DO Tmd�ww(gicl 741-Afm AX R7 M 741 43y (gig) 7+1-Asv December 1, 1995 GNEV 147 03-NEV-80 PIM 14.0115.5 Town of Truckee Specific Plan NOP DEIR SCH#95112049 Mr. Brats Wall, ��&6- Town of Truckee Planning Division Community Development Department 11570 Donner Pass Road Truckee, CA 96151 Dear Mr. Wall: ' Thank you for the opportunity to review and comment on the above referenced document. COMvMN17S: Cultural Resources The entire area within the Truckee Downtown Specific Plan is =mely in regards to cultural resources: historic and prehistoric archaeological sites, ethnographic village sites, historic structures (including buildings, bridges, rQ& and rai a . Sub -area #1 (Downtown commercial core) has been identified as a historic preservation district by Nevada County. Numerous archaeological sites have been recorded in all sub -areas. There is no doubt that ether sites have not yet beer) identified and recorded. Furthermore, some recorded historic archaeological sites (such as the old dump) should probably be revisited due to the evolution of historic archaeological information and concerns which have surfaced within the last 5 years. Regarding sub -area #8, the fenced boundaries of both cemeteries probably do not adequately reflect the true size of the cemeteries. Cha] histories report that indigents were routinely interred beyond the fenceiines. The Downtown Historic Preservation District (District) pertains only to standing buildings. The archaeological remains & rarnificadons for the District have not been explored. ' A thorough culnind resources inventory, including in-depth archival research, should be conducted before initiating any leveling or construction within the study area- Hvdraulics The existing roadway and storm drain facilities at various locations along State Route (SR) 267 have nearly reached their capacity. Inadequate surface drainage in the Town of Truckee and along SR 267 have contributed to minor ponding problems in the past_ 1— FPI 15:43 C7 it I. T PLHfAt•1ING F415_40 P_ss Mr. Egad Wall December 1, 1995 Page 2 Erosion from the surrounding areas as well sanding operations of the roadway have contributed to sediment transport and deposition that can clog these facilities. A Master Drainage Plan should be developed for the Town of Truckee Downtown Study Area, and provided to Caltrans for review and comment. A hydraulic analysis should be prepared for the subareas to address the existing and proposed storm drain systems which affect SR 267 and the proposed SR 267 Bypass. The utilixadon of oil and grease separators should be considered for the parking lot runoff arca$. Drainage related concerns have been provided to the Town through the TGWCF-QA document review process on at least three proposals which may affect the hydrology for the Downtown Study Area. The EIR should include a response to Caltrans comments on the following projects: The proposed Truckee Falls Golf Course (DGR # GNEV035) would affect a watershed arca of approximately 192 acres within the project site, which flows into Trout Creek. At the point where Trout C=k leaves the site it has a watershed area of approximately 4.17 square miles. This ereek flows through the Town of Truckee and crosses SR 267. The Peoria Sunnyside Cludet (GNEV020) proposed a commercial retail center and gas station in the southwest quadrant of Interstate 80 and SR 267, The Custom Cafe's Truckee Diner (FNEV122) proposes to develop the sate at West River Street and SR 257. Union Pacific Railroad (UPR.R) has proposed an acquisition (merger) with Southem Pacific Railroad (SPRR) in an application to the interstate Commerce Commission (ICC), A decision from the ICC on the December 1995 application is expected by next summer, 1996. The UPRR should be kept abreast of plans involving SPRR property, ie.: the balloon 1 trade in Subarea #7 and the tight of way at intermodal station in Subarea #1. The union of the two railroads will result in an increase of rail freight traffic through , Truckee. The Nevaria Department of Transportation and Amtrak West are investigating the possibility of Bay Area to Remo passenger rail service, including a 1997 ski season demo ' service using Danish IC3 equipment. The resulting increased passenger rail service for Truckee will necessitate that good pedestrian and transiVshuttle bus service to the Truckee intermodaii be preserved. Transit between the intermodal station and the sld resorts should be regarded as a public service to accommodate residents and tourist's transportation n=ds and to support Town of Truckee General plan policy vision and goals. I1-95 FR I 15 :44 CT PITT 3 PL -ANN I NG —P 41 5 =46 F . 6_+' Mr. Brad Wall December 1, 1995 Page 3 Trak Qperadons The circulation analysis should evaluate potential realignments or closures of existing roads. The realignment of Clenshire Drive so that it intersects 5R 267 at a more level location has been studied in the past and should be seriously considered as part of this study. Tile additional development in the Hilltop area may necessitate the prohibition of left -turn movements at the Old Brockway Road intersection with SR 267. Providing improved access to this area from Palisades Road should also be considered. The feasibility widening idening SR. 267 through this area should be assessed. If you have any questions or need assistance please contact Terri Peneovic, Inter Govemmental Rev'tewlCEQA Coordinator, at (916) 741-4199. Sincerely, T. F. A. °LIB" HARAliGH , Chief Office of Transportation Planning - Rural n cc: Antero Rivasplata, Chief, State Clearinghouse, Gov.'s OPR [Fax) s 1 Truckee Donner Public Utility District Business Office Planning Services (916) 587-3896 (916) 587-3944 January 8, 1996 FAX (915) 597-5056 RECEIVED Board of Directors Joseph R. Aguera J_ Ronald Hemig Robert A. Jones James A. Maass Patricia S. Sutton General Manager Peter L. Hotzmeister Brad Wall, Staff Planner JAS i° 6 Community Development Department Town of Truckee TOWN OF UEE 11570 Donner Pass Road �' CK Truckee, California 967£1 COMM) INITY DEVELOPMENT DEPT, Gear Mr. Wall. This letter is a response to your notice of Preparation for the Town of Truckee Downtown Study Area Specific Plan Environmental impact Report. Although the Truckee Donner Public Utility District does not engage in land use planning, we are grateful for the opportunity to comment on your work. Our District provides water and electric service in the area covered by your plan, so we have some interest in how that area will be developed. Based on what we have read to date the TDPUD will be able to fulfill its mandate top rovide water and electric service within the framework of the land uses you describe. Our water and electric system infrastructure are generally already developed in the area. The kinds of land uses you propose would not cause major impacts on our existing infrastructure. In recent years we have invested in replacement of older portions of our water system in the study area. We do not plan to do much else regarding water infrastructure; however, we do have plans to invest in and modify our electric system in your study area The Truckee substation is old and undersized. It currently relies on overhead facilities to distribute electric energy. to neighboring circuits. We plan to modernize that substation and install underground facilities wherever practical. In addition, there are other overhead lines in your study area that we plan. to underground as development occurs. We find that it is economical to underground existing overhead facilities when we are working with a specific development in the area; the undergrounding of facilities becomes an inexpensive adjunct to the work we do for the developer. Generally, we find that comrrrercial and industrial electric load enhances the economics of our electric system operation, so we are happy to see you plan for that kind of development in your 1 study area. An overreliance on residential electric load introduces system inefficiencies that could tend to boost electric rates for all_ A goad balance among various kinds of electric customers is ideal. Y-.._,,._ - r -,:r-__.- — -- We notice that the scope of work set forth for your review include water resources and public services. We will be happy to comment on specifics as you get further into your scope of work. Please continue to send me information and announcements of meetings as this process moves forward. Very truly yours, r Peter L. Holzmeister General Manager PLH/smc 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 i 1 1 1 f FROM: pMNIFAX T©' 9165027710 JUL 31. 1989 3=27PM tOO9 P.03 DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRORMF.NTA3, HEALTH Tim Snel l ings. Director. Truckee Division MEM ORI;X pum OouNTY OF NEVADA (9161 265.1452 ( 91,6 ) 582-7884 To: Ryitd wa) k From, Janet Mann. Environmental Heal.ti) Specialist III Date: Novembev 77, 1995 SubjccL: Notice of Prepara ion for rile Town of Truckee Downtown Study Area Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report Att.acl)cd is a c0py� of my name Land phone number for future informational meeting dates and retorts associated with the above referenced plan. An issue which I would lige add essed is in relation to the statement that future projects poposed in Lhe downtown study area need only provide detailed znalyses of those impacts that would occur above and 'beyond t ose dealt with in the above referenced document. The area of concern which I relieve should he adc)ressed on a site specific basis is in relation to existing hazardous waste soil and/or growdwater contaminated sites and how the proposed py•oject will de I and relate to these issu'�s (assessment., cleanup, mitigation m asures. etc.). 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 DIRECTORS TRTJC$EE TARGE AIRPORT DISTRICT Barbara K. Northrop PRESIDENT Donald A. Bedard William C. Chilcott F. Robert Marshall Louis M. Reinkens a -In the heart of America's Ail -,year playground October 31, 1995 Mr. Brad Wall, Staff Planner Town of Truckee, Planning Division 11570 Donner Pass Road Truckee, California 96161 Mary Catherine Tennant +GENERALMANAGER Ruth E. Geresy ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Janna S. Caughron CONTROLLER Re: Downtown Study Area Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report Dear Mr. Wall, Enclosed please find the signed Notice of Preparation for the Town of Truckee. The Truckee Tahoe Airport District is interested in participating in the process as a whole. In Paragraph #10, please include existing and increased airport traffic as related to noise impacts. I look forward to working with you. Sincerely, 4� CA4". Mary Catherine Tennant General Manager MCT:mcl cc: File b:4town-31.oct 10356 Truckee Airport Road • Truckee, California 96161 • Telephone (916) 587-4119 • FAX (916) 587-2984 TAHOE-TRUCKEE SANITATION AGENCY A Public Agency 13720]oerger Drive TRUCKEE. CALIFORNIA 96161 (916) 587-2525 December 1, 1995 Town of Truckee Community Development Dept., Planning Division Attn: Brad Wall, Staff Planner 11570 Donner Pass Road Truckee, CA 96161 Re. Downtown Study Area Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report Dear Mr. Wall: Directors Arnold V. Allen O.R. Butterfetd S. ,Lune Lewis Ronald V McIntyre Wendell Uiberg General Manager Craig F Woods RECEIVED D E C 4 1995 TOWN OF TRUCKEE CO W'Ifl'ITy L)E'!FL0 WNTDEPT. T -TSA is in receipt of your correspondence received on October 31, 1995 regarding the Downtown Study Area Specific Pian Environmental Impact Report. T -TSA staff has reviewed this project and offer no comments at this time. Thank you for the opportunity to continent on this project. Si reed ly 6 Craig F. Woods General Manager/Chief Engineer CFW1bb formltrinocmt.eir .NORTH TAHOE + TAHOE CITY 0 ALPINE SPRINGS - SQUAW VALLEY • TRUCKEE 'STATE OF CALIFORNIA PETE WILSON, Govemor Governor's Office of Planning and Research 1400 Tenth Street Sacramento, CA 95814 DATE: November 3, 1995 TO: Reviewing Agencies RE_ TOWN OF TRUCKEE DOWNTOWN STUDY AREA SPECIFIC PLAN SCH## 95112009 ' Attached for your comment is the Notice of Preparation for the TOWN OF TRUCKEE DOWNTOWN STUDY AREA SPECIFIC PLAN draft 1 Environmental Impact Report (ETR). Responsible agencies must transmit their concerns and comments on the scope and content of the NOP, focusing on specific information related to their own statutory responsibility, within 30 days of receipt of this notice. We encourage commenting agencies to respond to this notice and express their concerns early in the environmental review process. Please direct your comments to: BRAD WALL THE TOWN OF TRUCKEE PLANNING DIVISION �. 11570 DONNER PASS ROAD TRUCKEE, CA 95151 with a copy to the Office of Planning and Research. Please refer to the SCH number noted above in all correspondence concerning this project. If you have any questions about the review process, call Kristen Derscheid at (916) 445-0613. ' Sincerely, • ' ANTERO A. 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C❑ 33 yCy — �J �rikc r �a� "' .,��ka zU c Uayfr ''�' flZ w k Va� ria Sim rEZ tro t3cyw L �Z 2 y� Y�-+ � dti.,Q p+�.,d .o yp�b]q k'� ym7 yZ7 ro t_ ' yr n " E a� n �a ` .ds� t rdp c i v s C Z�-riia �, —V7tT L°+a.av;rr Y�`�,�+n ECae•✓ia �-^�P S�v'= X:.%� Sx-na vi�ei,n:na ZK:-;r'..= fti:ra CI,x ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ ❑ KI X 0 ❑ ❑ t4DQ-2e-1995 12: cc. FROM NORTHERN SfERPA AGMI) TO P.01 &I—?TNERN SIERRA AIR 0UTALITY MA NA GEMEN T DISTRICT Rodney Hill, APCQ 200 Dorsey Drive, Ste. 320, P.O. Box 2509 ss Valley, CA 95945 (116):274-9360 FAX (016) 274-7546 INovember 23, 1995 ' '1 Mr- Brad Wall Staff Planner, Town of Truckee Community Development Department 12030 Donner Pass Road Truckee. CA 96161 Past-ir Fax Mote 7671 Dace p001 ► TO bit. Ik LO 4. Ma. CO.JOWL CO. Rh v* A Phi 8 '2 Y _ 7j Fax # Fax # Re: Agency Comments on proposed EIR for Truckee DSA Dear Mr. Wall: The Northern Sierra Air Quality Management District (District) is in receipt of the Town of Truckee's" Notice of Preparation for the Town of Truckee Downtown Study Area Specific Plan } EIR". This notice was not dated, but stipulates comments must he returned to you no later $; than 30 days after notice arrived here November 2, 1995. Please accept these comments from the District for inclusion in the record. Under "scope 6f Work; (Nu' i lber) 5. Air 'iauatity" a`humber of irr"ipacts on local ai" quality are identified which could result from development of theDowntown Service Subareas in the `coming years. Those impacts identified to date are related to compliance with regulatory I tandards, environmental influences on local air quality, dust from construction, transit emissions, and woodstove emissions. This section ends by stating that "these impacts, as well as the appropriate mitigation measures, will be addressed in the EIR". The District will - follow the development of those sections of the EIR that are expected to affect Truckee's air- quality resources, and when possible, will provide data or critical review to assist in this process. ; During the recent District efforts in developing a Particulate Matter Air Quality Management Plan for the Town of Truckee, it was made clear that little data is available on Vehicle Miles Travelled (VMT) occurring within the Town of Truckee. VMT is a significant factor in particulate matter and ozone air pollution in California, and is especially important for Truckee by virtue of projected population, tourism growth, and the frequent need to apply road sands in inclement weather. Recorded particulate matter levels in Truckee.have exceeded State or National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Future -growth of either particulate matter cit bz-one pollution, especially from VMT, could jeopardize local resident's health and the area's Arra i t Air C]uaii Sy d r ;r1�a�srL HE, �`;� ls�r b`t�F+�r�llutanis. lis such:..�e,� request�n: at.t�ie a51A.1._AFyse.7r. de�e[opent of ,a uralecutr+nt,iand projected VMT' el, wt+n the Town of Truckee, and if possible, exten� to rnc�lude Truckee's sphere of ftence These figures will assist in planning for attaining and maintaining California and National Ambient Air Quality Standards for the Town of Truckee, and assist with specific NOV-28-1535 12:56 FROM NORTHERN SIERRA AQMD TO 5327710 P.02 future project reviews by Truckee or District planners. I look forward to following your development of the EIR in the corning months. Please feel free to Contact me at the Oistrict at 274-9350 with comments or questions. ' Sincerely, Rodney A. Hill Air Pollution Control Officer Greg Gilbe Air Pollution Control Specialist v. 1 SERVING THE COUNTIES OF NEVADA. RLUP141G Awn cacao„ s phi OFF ■ ti TgKE� MDE IN United States Department of the Interior BUREAU of LkND MANAGE-INAGE-NIENT <•, $' FOLSONI RESOURCE AREA 63 N.aTONIA STREFT FOLSOM. CALIFORNIA 95630 RECEIVED 1795 CA -018.18 N 0 v a 9 1995 Town Of Truckee Planning Division TOWN OF TRUCKEE ATT. Brad 'Wali COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPT, NOV � I� 11570 Donner Pass Road Truckee, CA 96161 I Dear Mr Wail 1 J ll r� LJ Thank you for your letter concerning the proposed Downtown Study Area Environmental Impact Report (EAR), The project and affected project area do not directly effect any Bureau managed public lands or programs. The project and EAR, as described, does not necessitate any additional coordination or consultation with our office. If you require any additional information concerning your project proposal or Bureau of Land Management information please contact ,Joe Hummel at (916) 985-4474. We are looking forward to the future when elements of your plan come to life with a revitalized downtown Truckee. Sincerely, D.K. Swickard Area Manager LJ e u f SOUTHWEST ORS [ORPORRTIOi1 November 13, 1995 Town of Truckee Community Development Department Planning Division 11570 Donner Pass Road Truckee, CA 96161 Re: Downtown Study Area Dear Mr. W all : RECEIVED N o V 14 1995 TOWN OF TRUCK,EE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPT. As you may be aware, Southwest Gas Corporation is planning to undertake the extension of natural gas distribution facilities to serve the greater Truckee area during 1996 and 1997. Natural gas presents a clean, cost effective alternative to wood burning and many potential long term benefits to the town. In the very near future, natural gas service will be available to all existing and new development within this study area. Southwest's expansion plans included a "Proponents Environmental Assessment" and CEQA review which resulted in a negative declaration being granted in February 1995. Southwest would be happy to share these documents with your review committee. If I can be of service, please do not hesitate to contact me at 1-800-277-8008. Sincerely, f Chris Hers erger Project Manager ICHAw 1 218 Incline Court Incline Village, Nevada 89451-9446 1 (702) 831-1066 ; 1-800-645-4541 r RECEIVED MEMORANDUM N O V 2 0 1995 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKST � �� � c re COUNTY OF PLACER EE COMMIjNITY DEVEt.OPhEiNT DEPT, TO: BILL COMBS, PLANNING DEPARTMENT DATE: NOV. 16, 1995 FROM: WES ZICKER SUBJECT, NOP - TOWN OF TRUCKEE DOWNTOWN STUDY ARM SPECIFIC PIAN DPW has reviewed the subject NOP and has the following comments: 1. The proposed Specific Plan proposes a considerable amount of additional development within the Town of Truckee. _We• -are_ concerned that the, _traffic _generated.., by .,.the proposed development__,_.could-signif icant ly - impact the intersection of SR--89:`_anr ' West River Street which is within .. Placer " County..The roposedTlevel of development could`-1ea{d'` tthe need .r- for signalization v Ii�Ft"frrtersectior 3r?Arf impacts trs'ttiis intersection !~~Should be addressed by,.the EIR for the project. 2. Any impacts to SR 267 and improvements required as mitigation for those impacts should be addressed. 3. The Specific Plan should identify a mechanism for funding any improvements identified as mitigations for impacts. cc: Tom Brinkman ATTACHMENT B FINAL EIR FOR THE DOWNTOWN TRUCKEE SPECIFIC PLATY. The Final EIR for the Downtown Specific Plan consists of the following documents: 1. Draft EIR for the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan 2. Comments and Response to Comments on the Final EIR (contained in Section A below) 3. Corrections and additions to the EIR (contained in Section B below) 4. Mitigation Monitoring Program (contained in Exhibit C-2) A. Comments on the Draft EIR and Response to Comments Received The attached comment letters are numbered to reflect the following responses. Letter #I; Law Offices of Paul Minalt, Representing Union Pacific Railroad Comment #1 : It is erroneous to assume that the Specific Plan "commits" the Town to a specific level of development on the Mill Site. The Downtown Specific Plan states clearly in policy 2.B.12 that the actual density of development in Master Plan areas may be higher or lower depending on more detailed studies done during the Master Plan process. No commitment is made to development until the Master Plan process is completed and development entitlements are issued. The purpose of the Master Plan process is to accommodate more detailed analysis of issues such as railroad operations and public safety concerns prior to any development, so that a development pian is proposed which addresses these specific concerns. Comment #2: Due to the existing lack of identified safe pedestrian crossings of the railroad tract~:, pedestrians are currently crossing the tracks at numerous locations downtown. The proposed at -grade crossing is proposed to help pedestrians identify a location where the tracks may be crossed. It is assumed that this crossing would be designed to incorporate crossing arms and warning device, as stated in Policy 4.B.4. Union Pacific may want to consider barrier fencing adjacent to the railroad tracks to direct all pedestrian crossings to designated areas. Given the number and frequency of trains running though downtown, the intensity of commercial development planned for the area, and the lack of a defined sidewalk and safe pedestrian crossing at the Bridge Street crossing, providing a safe crossing location is an important function of the proposed "Spring Street" pedestrian crossing. Therefore, the proposed crossing may be considered a possible means of mitigating existing and potential future impacts on public safety created by the railroad operations. Should an at grade crossing prove infeasible, alternatives of an i overhead or underground crossing would need to be considered. In order to reflect the Town's intent to work with Union Pacific on alternatives to the at -grade crossing should it be deemed infeasible, the following sentence will be added to policy 4.B.2 in Volume 2: "Should an at -grade crossing be infeasible, work with Union Pacific Railroad to identify possible alternatives for a safe pedestrian crossing in this location." Attachment B -- Final EIR Page I Letter 42: Ron West Consulting 1. Comment noted, The option for a supplemental EIR will be added to the options. 2. Comment Noted. This statement summarizes a more detailed policy 2.G.9 contained in volume 2. The summary statement will be changed to better reflect the intent of policy 2.G.9. 3. Comment noted. This project could very likely be constructed prior to the 4-7 year estimate if the Bright parcel develops and the developers are willing to participate in pedestrian bridge construction. The time frame specified in Table 1.1 is in no way intended to limit a project from occurring in an earlier time frame if feasible, 4. Comment noted. Please see response to comment #3. 5. Secondary service lines are primarily the responsibility of the TDPUD. 6. There are no policies or programs requiring that new development mitigate adverse impacts to riparian vegetation caused by another non -related development. 7. Comment noted. Statement will be added to the Final EIR as requested. Comment Letter #3: Northern Sierra Air Quality Management District 1. Comment noted. A primary focus of the Truckee Air Quality Management Plan is the reduction of airborne dust created by road sanding operations, either through improved street sweeping methods or use of alternative materials. Since the Truckee Air Quality Management Plan is not yet adopted, it is not possible to quantify the expected reductions of measures proposed in this plan. 2. It is recognized that the PM 10 pollution problem is a regional issue, created by factors not only within the boundaries of the DSA but within and beyond the boundaries of the Town of Truckee as a whole. The development potential allocated to the DSA is intended to implement Town General Plan policies directing a portion of future growth to the downtown. The Town General Plan quantifies the total PM 10 pollution generated within the Town limits at general plan buildout. This information is contained on page 20 of the Truckee General Plan technical analysis in Volume II of the Town General Plan, which was incorporated by reference into the Downtown Specific Plan EIR. Table 5 of this document states that at general plan buildout there will be approximately 7,168 lbs. per day ofPM10 emitted into the atmosphere within the Town of Truckee, assuming no mitigation. Since completion of the Truckee General Plan, additional air quality analysis has been done on the air quality impacts created by increased rail traffic through Town. This is summarized in response #9 to letter #5. As stated above, since the Truckee Air Quality Management Plan is not yet complete, it is not possible to quantify the expected reductions of measures proposed in the plan, and therefore it is not possible to make a finding Attachment S — Final EIR Page 2 n L 17, r— L 1 1 under CEQA that generation of PM 1 Q has been mitigated to less than significant levels. Because of this, a statement of overriding considerations will be adopted for the Downtown Specific Pian. 3. Comment noted. The Final EIR. will be submitted to the NSAQMD for review. Please see response to comment #2 regarding quantitative analysis of PSI 10 levels. 4. Comment noted. The suggested mitigation will be added under D. Mitigation Measures on Page 7-4 & 5 of the DEIR. 5. Chapter 4 and Appendix A of the Draft EIR contain a detailed description of the increase in vehicle traffic which will occur as a result of Downtown Plan Implementation. The DEIR discloses that the impact from P -M, 10 generation is considered significant, and at this time untnitigable. The worst-case scenario for PM 10 impacts has been quantified as described in response 42. The DEIR references the general plan policies l mitigation measures contained in the Town General Plan under Conservation & Open Space Goal # 11. These policies 1 mitigation measures are intended to address the PM 10 problem on a comprehensive 'basis, since the problem is not limited to the boundaries of the DSA. 6. Comment Noted. Sentence will be modified as suggested. 7. Comment noted. See responses #2 & 95. Comment Letter #4 - Breeze Cross 1. Due to the time frame in which LSC was required to perforin the Truckee Downtown Circulation Study, it was necessary to conduct traffic counts for the study in February of 1996. It was realized, however, that these counts did not represent a true peak time period, which typically occurs during the summer months of July and August. In order to account for this and to develop summer peak hour traffic volumes, it was necessary for LSC, Inc. to adjust the winter traffic counts upward in order to estimate summer traffic volumes in the Downtown core area. This adjustment was based upon traffic count data collected by Caltrans at the SR 267[Union Pacific Railroad at -grade highway crossing. The adjustment was performed by identifying summer peak hour traffic volumes crossing the railroad tracks and comparing them to traffic volumes counted during the February field surveys. This provided a basis for adjustment by Which the February counts were factored in order to represent Winter peak time periods. This was the best available method by which to develop current Summer peak hour traffic estimates given the timing of the Truckee Downtown Circulation Study. We continue to conclude that these volumes represent a conservative ("high") estimate of traffic volumes. In order to provide a traffic database by which the Town of Truckee can review future development proposals, as well as monitor traffic conditions in the Downtown core, Policy 3.5.8 will be added to Volume 2 which states the following: Implement a traffic monitoring program to track traffic flow counts at key intersections in Attachment E — Final EIR Page 3 the Downtown core. Use this information to track the traffic changes over time for comparison against the findings of the Downtown Traffic Analysis, and to determine when an update of the Downtown Traffic model may be necessary. 2. The gig Springs at Northstar and Lahontan traffic impact studies were performed independently of the Truckee Downtown Circulation Study. These projects are located on the SR 257 corridor south of the Downtown Study Area. In the Truckee Downtown Circulation 5tudv, these projects were accounted for as external traffic generators to the project study area. As such, the traffic impacts that these projects would have on the downtown study area were grouped with other planned and potential projects along the Highway 267 corridor south of the Town limits. This was done independent of the traffic impact studies performed for these developments, and was consistent with trip generation rate assumptions used in development of the Truckee transportation demand model. The cause for the discrepancy in the project generated traffic estimates for the two traffic impact studies is due to different assumptions regarding average occupancy of the dwelling units and different assumptions regarding trip generation which is internal to the project area. The traffic generation rate derived from the Lahontan Project of 0.588 peak hour trips per home is closer to average national rates, which vary from 0.55 to 1.0 trips per home, than the rates derived from the Big Springs at Northstar traffic study. This latter study appears to focus on an "average ' peak" winger design day, rather than the "peak" winter design day evaluated for Lahontan. 3. Any traffic model is, unfortunately, a rough tool for approximating future traffic volumes. Considering that these models attempt to replicate human behavior, the "state of the practice" is such that a 15 percent calibration is considered to be a relatively good level of accuracy. I At some locations in the downtown stuffy area, the model calibration was lower than the observed ground counts, and in other locations, it was higher than the observed ground counts. In the transportation modeling process, it is necessary to identify a set of traffic volumes which represent peak conditions, and to then calibrate to those volumes. Since the peak hour traffic volumes were developed based upon peak observed flow rates at the Caltrans count station at the State Route 267/Union Pacific Railroad at -grade crossing, it is reasonable to assume .that these volumes represent true peak conditions. These volumes are still subject to fluctuation from day to day, as traffic volumes are virtually never identical from one day to the next. However, it is reasonable to assume the peak hour volumes as a valid base by which to calibrate the traffic model. Additionally, since some calibrated volumes are higher than the ground counts and some are lower, this will tend to compensate for the fluctuation which can occur in day to day volumes. For instance, if the ground counts are actually 15 percent lower than the true peak, this would indicate that the traffic model calibration volumes that are 15 percent higher than the ground counts would actually be 30 percent higher than the true peak. However, calibration volumes which are 15 percent lower than the ground count volumes would actually match the true peak. Attachment B - Final EIR Page 4 This will tend to keep the model calibration within 15 percent of peak conditions as a whole, even though specific locations could be off by a larger margin. 4. The impact of circulating traffic in the downtown core area searching for parking is accounted for in the transportation model to the extent that the transportation model is calibrated to existing traffic volume conditions which include this circulating traffic. As these volumes use more of the existing roadway capacity than would otherwise be used without circulating traffic, the model "links" in the downtown area have a higher delay than they would otherwise_ As a result, the model tends to assign traffic that would otherwise pass through downtown (as it is the shortest route) to other streets (such as West River Street, and the interstate) to avoid these delays. 5. The Downtown Specific Plan traffic analysis describes the impacts which will occur with both 2015 projected and total "buildout" of the Town, therefore the year 2615 was not the only analysis scenario developed. The explanation of the analysis scenarios used is contained on page ` 26-27 of Appendix A of the Draft EIR. Since a purpose of the Downtown Plan is to further refine the land uses and growth accommodated in the DSA, it is appropriate to evaluate the needed traffic improvements which may be required within the lifetime of the Specific Plan, which is 24 years. 6. The methodology used for generating growth projections for Truckee as a whole is contained in Volume III of the Truckee General Plan, which has been incorporated by reference into the DEIR. The projections for Truckee were prepared through the following steps: 1) First, projections of basic employment have been based on Nevada County projections and estimated Truckee capture rates, based on historic trends. 2) Second, projections of local serving employment, housing, and population have been based on the economic and demographic characteristics of Truckee. Actual growth since adoption of the General Plan is 2.8%. The General Plan projection of 2.1 % annual growth shows a reasonable correlation to this actual growth. . As population growth occurs, assuming the amount of new construction remains fairly constant, the growth percentage would actually decline even though the number of dwelling.units being constructed per year does not decline. 7. If the land use assumptions which drive the traffic analysis are incorrect, this will mean that traffic impacts identified for the twenty year time frame will occur either sooner or later than the twenty year planning horizon. For instance, if development rates occur faster than those projected for the twenty year analysis, associated traffic impacts.would also occur sooner. If development rates are lower than those anticipated in the twenty year time frame, associated traffic impacts would occur later than the twenty year time frame. It is also. important to consider that the Downtown Area Plan does not "set in stone' the roadway improvements that will be implemented for the next twenty years, but rather gives us a general direction to ensure that our short-term plans and improvements will fit into a rational long-range program. Since there is a high degree of uncertainty necessarily inherent in estimating future IAttachment B — Final EIR Page 5 development patterns and rates, it would be appropriate for the Town to regularly monitor development trends and to conduct a general plan update process which reassess development trends every five years, which will allow the town to adjust its planning process as the community develops. In addition, the traffic monitoring effort described in response 41 to letter #4 will provide a "warming system" to help the Town respond to unexected changes in traffic patterns and volumes. S. The new access road would provide property access between the Old Mill Site and State Route 257. The connections shown in the Figures presenting Alternatives 1 through 8 were identified for conceptual purposes only. In order to provide efficient and convenient access to the Old Mill site, it would be highly desirable to provide one or more connections to Highway 267. For this reason, it was assumed that this type of connection would be provided. For purposes of the forecasting process, it was not necessary to specify the exact location of this roadway. Detailed alignments were therefore not identified, and it was assumed that roadway connections would occur at locations where there are existing "T" intersections with Town of Truckee side streets and the State Route 267 corridor. These roadways are intended to present a conceptual scheme for connecting the Old Mill Site to the SR 267 corridor. Detailed alignments, however, would need to be further explored, with associated design and independent environmental documentation occurring prior to any new roadway construction to service the Mill Site, 9. This assumption was based upon output of the traffic model which indicates that the quickest travel route to the Gateway Center Area and Interstate 80 west will be via the proposed Western Underpass, as opposed to traveling through Downtown Truckee. The travel time savings are therefore forecast to create a redistribution of traffic to the western underpass, and away from the existing at -grade railroad crossing. Some drivers (particularly visitors new to the area) will undoubtedly be unaware of the new underpass, and will therefore continue to use the existing at -grade crossing and Commercial Row. However, an adequate majority of drivers can be expected to use the new route to result in the effect identified in the model. 10. We agree that employment growth in the Truckee -- North Tahoe region, coupled with the prohibitions against increasing affordable housing stock in the Tahoe Basin, will yield an increase in the number of primary residences in Truckee. Whether this results in an increase in the proportion of houses that are used as primary residences will depend both upon the rate of employment growth and the rate of housing development in Truckee. Conversion of second homes to primary residences would tend to increase overall daily traffic volumes in Truckee. The trip generation rate per primary dwelling unit used in the model is 0.6 vehicle -trips per peak -hour, while that used for a second home is 0.41. Each residence converting from secondary to primary can therefore be expected to increase traffic by approximately 0. 19 vehicle -trips. Attachment B — FinaI EIR Page 6 1 The impact of conversion, however, would be lessened by the fact that peak traffic generation periods for primary homes will tend to be less in the peak direction than will peak -hour, peak - direction travel generated by second homes. Put simply, there is a high chance that a second - home resident of Tahoe Donner will add to the northbound SR 267 traffic queue at the end of the ski day than will a primary home resideiit. It is also worthwhile to consider that the traffic model already incorporates an increase in the proportion.of primary residences in Truckee: The existing number of residences (4,997) comprises 55 percent of the total housing stock, while the Year 2015 assumption regarding the number of primary residences (7,066) comprises 59 percent of the housing stock. r11. The construction of an Eastern Undercrossing will reduce traffic volumes at Bridge Street and Corn-Mercial Row by providing an alternate travel route to the Old Mill Site, which is forecast to be an extensive traffic generator in the twenty year analysis time frame. This reduction in traffic volume would preclude the need for a traffic signal at Bridge Street and Corri nercial Row. However, a traffic light would still be required at the intersection of Bridge Stmet/W est River Street_ It would be possible to construct a traffic signal at Bridge Street/West River Street without constructing a traffic signal at Bridge Street/Commercial Row, if railroad preemption technology is used as a portion of the traffic signal design to insure that queued vehicles at the traffic signal would not be trapped on the railroad tracks. It should also be noted that the highest period of demand to make the eastbound left turn from East River Street to Bridge Street will be when a train is blocking the at -grade crossing. During these periods, there will not be any through traffic moving along. Bridge Street to conflict with this movement, greatly easing this movement. 12. Comment noted. Please see response to comment 1'rl'3 below. 13. The allocation of the year 2015 growth is a factor of the total buildout estimated Town -wide. In order to avoid another "assumption" in the 2015 traffic analysis, the total amount of growth outside the DSA was reduced by a consistent percentage on all properties "in order to match the total employment and population growth estimated for the year 2015..The commercial capacity of the other PC areas, the DSA, and other available infill areas are included in the estimate of total commercial for the year 2015, resulting in what seems to be a relatively low commercial percentage allocated to PC -2. Since policy direction is contained in PC -2 Policy 6 of the Town General Plan that directs PC -2 to be developed primarily as a destination recreational community, it was assumed that most of the commercial development occurring on the site would be in the form of a hotel and related uses, and not in the form of a stand - alone shopping center or office complex. At full buildout of the general plan (and PC -2), the traffic model shows that Tahoe Donner residents would prefer to drive to PC -2 to do their shopping instead of going to Donner Pass Road stores. This would tend to reduce traffic volumes on Donner Pass Road. The traffic model for the MAPF initiative was done for a year 2015 scenario since the effects of the, MAPF initiative are only for a 20 year time. frame. The fact that the majority of growth Attachment B — Final E[R Page 7 projected to occur on PC -2 over the next 20 years was primarily in the form of a destination resort resulted in a demonstrably small shift of traffic over to Donner Pass Road. This is because the 2015 model was not showing as strong a "pull" from Tahoe Donner to PC -2 over the 20 year timeframe as there would be under the buildout scenario. 14. The traffic model for the MAPF initiative showed no need to widen any portion of Donner Pass Road to four lanes, primarily due to the fact that the shift in resort development potential to other parts of the Town does not represent a major shift in traffic patterns over the next 20 years. The Town General Plan accommodates substantially more cornmercial space (2.5 million square feet) than projected demand over the next 20 years (1.5 million square feet). Even with the reduction in commercial square footage created over the 20 year time frame by the MAPF initiative, there is still more than adequate land allocated to meet the projected commercial growth in Truckee. The statement that the mill site should be re-evaluated for auto oriented uses because it will be the only location available for such uses is not supported by the information contained in the Truckee General Plan. Comment Letter #5 - Sylvester Engineering 1. The California State Planning and Zoning Law, specifically California Government Code Sections 65000 - 66025, set forth the requirements and criteria for two comprehensive planning documents: A general plan, which is required for all counties and municipalities, and a specific plan, which a planning agency may prepare for systematic implementation of all or part of the area covered by the general plan. State Planning and Zoning Law contains no provisions for �I "community pians" or "area plans". Article S of the State Planning and Zoning Law sets forth the specific content requirement of a specific plan. These are as follows. I . The distribution, location, and extent of uses of land, including open space, within the area covered by the plan. 2. The proposed distribution, location, and extent and intensity of major components of public and private transportation, sewage, water, drainage, solid waste disposal, energy, and other essential facilities proposed to be located within the area covered by the plan and needed to support land uses described in the plan. 3. Standards and criteria by which development will proceed, and standards for the conservation, development, and utilization, of natural resources, where applicable. 4. A program of implementation measures including regulations, programs, public works projects, and financing measures necessary to cant' out items 1, 2 & 3. 5. The specific plan shall include a statement of the relationship of the specific plan to the general pian. 6. The specific plan may address any other subjects which in the judgement of the planning agency are necessary or desirable for implementation of the general plan. 2. In regard to the Mill Site and Hill top areas, the Specific Plan contains the required information set forth in the items listed above. Specifically, the land use policies in Chapter 2H and 21, and land use table 2.1, set forth the distribution, location, and extent of uses of land. and Attachment S — Final EIR Page 8 0 n 11 the zoning standards in Chapter l 1 for the Master Plan district set forth the standards and criteria by which development will proceed, etc. 3. Pages 1-1 and 1-2 of the Draft EIR describe the intended use of the Downtown Specific Plan EIR. The EIR is intended as a program level EIR, the function of which is to provide a more comprehensive analysis of environmental effects than would be practical in an EIR on an individual action. Section 15168 of the CEQA Guidelines provides an exhaustive list of the functions of a program EIR. Page 1-2 of the Draft EIR states that "Due to the broad scope of the Downtown Specific Plan, and the potential for significant site specific impacts related to new development projects, new "discretionary" development projects will be subject to further review at the application stage." Site specific environmental analysis is more appropriately done when an actual development proposal is submitted, otherwise identification of specific environmental impacts and mitigation measures is speculative at best. Furthermore, the mitigations 1 policies listed in the DEIR provide clear direction on the issues to be considered in subsequent environmental review. The purpose of an EIR is to disclose potentially significant impacts and mitigation measures. There is no requirement in State Law that an EIR discuss the potential to provide redevelopment projects, determine mitigation fees, or finance public improvements. 4. The cornmenter provides no references or authority for his claim that "impacts whether direct, indirect, or cumulative can only be evaluated based on the full buildout of any proposed program". In fact, Section 15 13 0 of the CEQA guidelines specifically states that a "summary of projections" contained in a plan are an adequate basis for cumulative impacts analysis. In order to evaluate the "realistic implementation" of the Specific Pian, the 24 year projections provide a basis related to quantitative analysis of actual growth trends, rather than the more theoretical basis 'of a buildout scenario. 5. Table 2.1 of the Specific Plan, Volume 2, provides the requested information regarding the type, size, and location of land uses proposed within the Specific Plan. 6. The DEIR evaluates the traffic scenario which would occur without construction of theBypass or the Tahoe Donner connector. This scenario, called the "No Build" 'altemative, is described on page 31 of appendix A. Traffic generation from the Mill Site and Hilltop subareas were based on the land use projections contained in Table 2.1 of Volume 2. The Master Plan process provides the opportunity for future development in these areas to exceed the projections in Table 2. 1, however the impacts of this additional development would need to be analyzed with project specific environmental review. 7. Comment noted. No specific reponse to this comment is required.. 8. Since the Town has little authority to require cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater outside of issuing development entitlements, responsibility for clean up of these environmental resources are primarily with the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Board and the Nevada County Environmental Health Department. Since the contamination problem is an existing condition, the Attachment B — FinaI EIR Pa -e 9 Town's most effective role will be in facilitating coordination between responsible parties and the regulatory agencies, pursing grant applications, and ensuring that development projects comply with Lahontan and Environmental Health requirements as a condition of development entitlements. The statement that existing contamination problems will result in a loss of development potential, thereby affecting the ability to establish a redevelopment area, provide financing, and finance needed roadway improvements is an issue that is irrelevant to the contents of the EIR, in addition to being highly speculative and unsubstantiated by factual evidence. Establishment of a Redevelopment area including the DSA would not be adversely affected by the existence of contaminated soil, in fact one of the functions of a Redevelopment agency is to facilitate cleanup of contamination. Proposed road improvements in the DSA will be primarily financed through road mitigation fees, which are generated Town -wide as new development occurs. These fees are not dependant on development of the mill site. Financing of streetscape improvements in the DSA will be a public-private partnership in the form of an assessment district, in -lieu fees, and impact fees. Primary contributors to these financing methods will be existing business owners, and entrepreneurs who convert existing residential structures to new businesses in the downtown core. These financing mechanisms are not dependent on the contribution of fees from undeveloped parcels. In addition, the economic growth fueled by implementation of the Specific Plan will likely result in an increase in property values in the DSA, which will provide increased incentives for cleanup of existing contamination problems. 9. The primary pollutant generated by the additional rail traffic through Town is in the form of particulate matter. The increased rail traffic is not an effect attributable to implementation of the Downtown Specific Plan, however the pollutants generated by increased rail traffic could arguably add to the existing pollutant levels. In March 1996, the Northern Sierra Air Quality Management District provided emissions calculations related to the increase in air pollutant emissions resulting from the Union Pacific / Southern Pacific railroad merger. The pollutant of concern in the Truckee air basin is PM 10, The District estimated primary PM 10 emissions from the additional locomotives and from increases in traffic idling caused by gate down conditions. In summary, the PM 10 emissions from the projected increase in train traffic will be approximately 120 lbs. Per day, and the increase in PM 10 from traffic congestion will be approximately 1 lb. Per day. As is stated in the response to comment 92 from Letter #3, the total cumulative PM 10 emissions from the Town are estimated to be 7,108 lbs. Per day. The increased rail traffic emissions represents 1.7% of the total emissions estimated to be generated on a cumulative basis. While this represents an addition to the PM 10 problem, it is a fairly small percentage of the expected total. In order to mitigate the impacts of increased rail traffic on air quality, Union Pacific Railroad has contributed '$300,000 to the Town of Truckee to be used for the purpose of reducing PM10 generation in Town. In regard to developing effective mitigation measures for the PM10 problem in Truckee, please reference response to continent 95 for letter 43. 10. A noise analysis for the existing railway line running through the DSA is contained- in Volume 11 of the Town General Plan, which was incorporated by reference into the DEIR. This noise analysis was based on approximately 10 trains per day, and showed an "unacceptable„ Attachment S — Final EIR Page 10 1 1-1 1-1 t u Ll 1 noise level of 66.6 dB CNEL at a distance of 200 feet from the rail lines. Jim Brennan of Brown Buntin Acoustics was consulted regarding the effect of increased train traffic though the DSA. He has estimated that if the rail merger increases the train traffic though the DSA to 25 trains per day, this will increase the ambient noise levels by approximately 5dB. Because sound pressure levels are defined as logarithmic numbers, the values cannot be directly added or subtracted. Two noise sources have two times the energy of one source, and 10 times the logarithm of two equals three. Therefore, if the noise level at 200 feet was 66.6 dB CNEL at 200 feet with 10 trains per day, it will increase to 69.6 d13 CNEL at the same distance with 20 trains per day, and 71 dB CNEL at 25 trains per day. The noise contour for the 66.6 dB CNEL, will extend to 275 feet. As explained on page 8-2 of the DEIR, new development could be exposed to significant noise levels in areas adjacent to the UP rail line. Noise levels for new development will be mitigated to acceptable levels as a condition of issuance of development entitlements, as described by the mitigation measures on page 8-3 of the DEIR. 11. Chapter 9 of the DEIR describes the vegetation and wildlife species present in the DSA. The riparian areas adjacent to the Truckee River and it tributaries of Donner Creek and Trout Creek are identified as biologically sensitive areas in the DEIR. A map showing the specific location of the Truckee River, Trout Creek, and Donner Creek is contained in Figure 6.3 of Volume II Specific Plan. As is appropriate for a program level EIR, mitigation measures are included on page 9-4 of the DEIR in the form of policy direction and zoning standards establishing setbacks from the Truckee River with the express purpose of protecting riparian vegetation and river ecology. The DEIR states on page 1-2 that new discretionary development projects will be subject to further environmental review at the application stage. This will allow necessary site specific analysis of impacts when development proposals are more defined and less speculative. 12. Due to the lack of specific examples of the "base data" requested in this comment, it is assumed that the commenter is referencing the information requested in comments 1 - 11. Please reference responses to these comments. Chapter 13 of the DEIR describes the purpose of project alternatives under CEQA and the specific alternatives evaluated. As is stated in this chapter, none of the project alternatives evaluated will reduce the significant unmitigable impacts identified to less than significant levels. la. The following responses are based on the criteria contained in Article 9 of the CEQA Guidelines regarding the content requirements of an EIR. 1) It is not the function of a program EIR to determine the development feasibility for any given area. 2) It is not the function of a program EIR to determine the precise level of development appropriate for any given area. 3) See response to comment # 8. 4) Neither the DEIR nor the Downtown Specific Plan propose reducing development on areas outside the Downtown Specific Plan. 14. Please reference the responses to individual comments listed above regarding noise, air quality, soil contamination, and biological resources. The traffic analysis for the DEIR is contained in Chapter 4 and appendix A of the document_ Attachment B — Final FIR Plage I I Tony Lashnrock August 11, 1.9 9 7 Page 3 Please do not hesitate to call me with any questions regarding these comments. Si' ce=elY yours, P : Xinauit ec: Jeremy G. Sullivan, Esq. Christine Smith, Esq. Thomas E. Greenland, Esq, Don Lightwine Frank Ridlev ,Tim Mataa ,�- -7 Land (;se ptanrjing Entibernents Ph. (209) 523-332' 4 No. Santa Ant Ave. Fax: 1209) 32-5-x645 est. Ca 95354 Rzgus t 11, 1991 Town of Truckee 11570 Horner Pass. Road Truckee, Califorzla 96161 Attn: Elizabeth Eddins, Town Pla=er CQm=n ty Development Departm- cant L J RE: COMMENTS TO DC�1NI TOWN SPECIr T_C PLAN CFA7 :' E_R Dear Planners and Council; On behalf cf the Bright parcel (#19-390-12), ttsa--k you for tue Opportunity to provide comments to the Downtown Specific Pian Draft EIR. In addition tc our comments below, we would like to reference any EIR related issues izz our Letter of August 4, 1997 requesting zcning and other changes in the DSP and Zoning Ordinance. C3�PTER is Page 1--2; para.4: Re est to add "Su Zemental EIR'' to List ofrp ocesses for Dossible additional environmental review. This additional st �a' - cedura t.anda� �. p.c defined by C?QA might be an appropriate evtion during the 20 -year life of this Szeci�ic Plan. Table 1.1 pg 1-12: RegUest that "Program Po3icv 2.(;.q" -be Current wa di .ng "clu'st--r residential development alone; the River" seems vague. Letts eliminate any future carfusicn by noting that "bu7ld ng placement, Raj � L r-st CQnsu I t i rg PHCNF= NO. Aug. ii Lcc7 07: I7PN PS Draft I7vwrntown EIR Co=ents; Aug. 11, !997 Ron West Consulting, for Bright parcel . appropriate cluet¢rinq azd/cr of er land planning concepts should be consider: ed to address Fiver frontage issue oown-cwn River ficn�are parze,s will 2 I a?ready be subject to the Dcwntown planned oeve?opment overlay Zane, and an e.Ytensive variety of oche- EIR Program Policies also address River frontage. The wcrdini g of6f the niz:i of pclJcies should allow good, clear cc=ur-icat=ons as development occ;:rs in the "future. Table 1..1 pq 1-19:. Request that the "imnlememtatioxz TjMj- n� for pracram Policy 4-3.5,2 gedes'trian & Bike Br:.d a across Raver at Location #2I he chance -ed from 4-•7 years, to 1-3 ears _ Considering the Large number of EIR progw am/po l ,-cies included i^ the 1-3 year timeframe., it appears that the pattern of f utuy e de,7e loptne^t W4 ! 1 somewhat dr '; ve actua? order of these Prccrams. in the event that devel--pmen t of t e Bright parcal does begin in the nett few years, the public fundi g of this bridge should be underway within the 1-3 Year period. Table 1.1 pg 1-25: Re est that the "Imnle�se^tat%on T:.min ' for policy /Program 5C Segment Its be changed from B-13 vears to 4 years or SC7i]a1+eS� - ' As with the ita±n above, CagztQl Faci? it7 es Program budgets and priorities should c-ardirata public funding of improverme_^its as they are needed. The ;CM Rrn ues t CCn eu 1 t i rq ?; iHL;Nt NU. HU Q. 11 1.7 r 6CIZ : 1 1`�M P4 1 t t 1 Li C C Draft Dawntcwn EIR Comments: Aug. i?, 1997 Ron West C;nsultir.g , for Bright Parcel pub 1. access being requested to arid. tktrroug^ t:_ne Far fight parcel may require m,assessment3, :mzaC Z Fees & Redevel ov. ment Funds" funding to be directed to this area earlier than 8-12 gears. "Table 1.I pg 1-28: F-urtber clarification or defin-it3cn of * seccr.dary se=i ee I ineS " needed? Thos team may be very c? ear as stared, � or, pcsswbly a de-finition or referenca to Towr_ Standards ccul d he noted. C LITER 9: C. Impacts p'j 9-3: Rectuest clarify cation that Undevelo ed at cels are riot a ected to "imorave" Ricer habitats ( see paragraph 2 under C) . clearly, new development carrot be assumed to improve any adverse c�-,nditicns not causes: by their parce? s . CHAPTER 10 B. Cultural/Historic Resources Eva.luat .or Guidelines pg 10 Rewest ct�mmaent be addesi that in same circum tances ccnsultaticn wi `.b local Indian tribes ma as a brQrriate as wztia ocher Agencies. Again thank you for this I r vvv have a=7 questions, please cartact me anytime. Thank You Sincerely, Fran o ultant VM I S'lttt]V Z)IM;CtS} _AIN t.iuALj I r M,WfmAIZCr-jVIQ;V 1 VI j I I"ttU I �iidll�Y,A, IIiIL-AMQ- SPO Litton Drive. Ste. 320, P.(3. Box 2549 rass'Vauey, CA 95945 16) 274-9360, FAX. (916) Z74-7:46 Elizabeth Eddins, Town Planner August 11, 199-7 Town of Truckee Planning Division 11570 Donner Pass RoadIL -�.-- Truckee, Ca. 46161 ` ' IQ Re: Drat} Truckee Downtown Specific Pian „.......... .... Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the Draft Downtown Truckee Specific Plan. The Northern Sierra Air Quality Management District (the District) agrees with your findings that the proposed development could exacerbate exisdrrg PMIO pollutant levels in the Truckee-area- The ruckeearea`The District understands that it is hportant that the Specific Downtown Plan preferred alternative (Alternative mI) be implemented_ In fact, the proposed Flan states on Page 2-1 that if existing zoning was maintained, neither encouraging or discouraging development there would be a real potential for even greater environmental impacts due to ignoring additional commercial and residential growth in the DSA and the longstanding problems with parking and ;pedestrian access. However, the long term potential air quality impacts from the implementation- of this proposed plan could easily cause the Truckee area to be in violation of the federal air quality standards for PMIO. In addition to the strong passibility sof exceeding the federal standard for PMIO, Truck= has the distinct likelihood of exceeding the newly promulgated federal PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 microns or less, or fine particulate) air quality standard in the facture. Since the largest source of PMIO in the downtown Truckee area is from sanding materials placed on paved roads for traction, the higher emissions will likely come from the increased number of vehicles in the downtown area through the proposed addition of parking Iots and a new 3 -story parking garage. Although the Town of Truckee and the District are in the process of developing an Air Quality Management Plan which will assist in rningating some of these increased emissions, there will still be a net increase in PM 10 emissions due to a greater amount of traffic in the downtown area. Additionally, increasing the traffic in downtown Truckee could possibly impact the traffic on a regional basis. As the District requested in its November 1995, comment letter on the proposed EIR, a . quantitative analysis of PMIO emissions is necessanr to determine the air quality impacts of this Z plan. The analysis should calculate errussioh increases due to the proposed development, demonstrate the reduction in emissions with the implementation of the Truckee AQ14iP, and subtract further reductions from the regional bike1ped trail systern. The District would be happy to assist you in the methodology of this analysis. The Downtown Specific Plan states that since significant, uncontrollable impacts to Truckee air duality are highly likely at Statement of Overriding Considerations will be drafted prior to the final Specific Plan. The District obviously would like to review and comment on the Statement prior to final drafting of the Specific Plan, and would like the Statement and the hnal Specific Plan to contain a more quantitative analysis of PMIO emission levels. In addition to the above concerns, the district suggest the following detailed changes to the proposed Plan: . I On page 7-3, at the bottom of the second paragraph, a mitigation to control particulate matter from road sanding should be added; improved sweeping practices. I On Page 7-4, it is stated that "respirable particulate matter that originates as road dust will likely account for less than half of the increase in ?MIO generated in the DSA, because of the relatively small amount of new road -miles proposed (as well as the low travel speeds that occur) within the DSA." Emissions from paved roads actually rely on the average weight and amount of vehicles � on the road, as well as the amount of silt (materials less than 75 micrometers diameter) in the road dust. So with any increase in vehicle miles traveled (VMT) to the downtown area due to improved and increased parking lots, there will be an increase in emissions. Once again, the District would like to see estimates of VMT. The last sentence of the same paragraph states that "Vehicular emissions sources account for only 2°r4 of the PMIO generated on a town -wide basis." This should be modified to state "Vehicular tailpipe erriissicns... basis.- In conclusion, the final Downtown Specific Plan will play a key role in determining the future air quality in Truckee_ It is important that the Plan calculate the PMIO emissions from the } development of the Plan's preferred alternative in order to demonstrate how the proposed developments in the plan will affect the air quality. The District looks forward to reviewing the Statement of Ovem-iding Considerations and the emission calculations. t Sincerely, I Rodney A. Fill Air Pollution Control Officer Con:.Ire^rs on the Downtown Tr uc?�ee Specific Plan Draft EIR by Embrey B_ `=Breeze" Cross Truckee Downtown Circulation Studv AUG 11 1997 R Esistina Traffic Volumes - Pie 3 LSC used February 7 and 14, 1996 traAilc counts to calfmare their traffic model. These are Wednesday tures and do not truly refect our average daily and hourly counts for the winter period. By personal observation, our winter time weekend peak hour and daily traffic is much higher than the mid -week counts. These counts were factored by Caltrans i average and daily counts for the months of January, April, pad July to estimate or project summer weekday peak Dour and daily volumes. Did the Caltrans counts include weekend traffic? If so, the projections may be flawed. Also, if we are concerned about peak traffic, shouldn't we be focusing on Aug=L a affic taunts, and looking at peak weekend periods when gridlock occurs, rather than traditional urban commute hours. Has any consideration been given to validating our projected existing conditions by doing summer counts? Previous Plans and Studies - page 24 There is a major inconsistency between the Big Springs at Northstar impact projections and those from Lahontan. Big Springs will add 26 ,peak hour trips from the addition of 178 housutg units, a factor of .146 trips per unit Lahontan projects _ 32 trips for 565 units, a factor of.588 trips per home. Whv the difference? Which is more accurate? Downtown Truckee Transvortation Yodel - page 22 In bullet =`r . it was stated that the calibrated Link volurnes were found to be within 15 3 percent of ground count volumes in the DSA. It was further stated that it is not uncommon for ground counts to vary from 14 to 15 percent from one day to the next. The cone lusion was then drawn that the model has a high level of accuracy. Couldn't a ' conclusion also be drawn that the model may be off by as much as 34 percent? During peak summer hours. there is an impact on traffic flows caused by vehicles searching for a piace to park. This aaf nc is generally slower and is internal to the DSA. How was this phenomena accounted for in the model"? Land Use Pro`ec rons/Traffic Generntion and Distribution - page 26 ' For the long grange transportation process, yex 2015 was chosen as the detailed planning ana.ivsis vear. I retail the Genemi Plan used Build Out for it's traffic modeling, partially because there was not enough data to accurately project growth through planning year 2015. The argument was also made that future mitigation should be based on build out cumbers rather than the planning year numbers. Why have we deviated from that plmlosophy here? t Fia,ure A- , - Page 52 I disagree with the assumption that vehicles traveling to Gateway or I-80 Westbound will no longer use the Bridge St. at Bade crossing once the Western Undercrossing is constructed. Other comments: There is another phenomenon occurring, which will have a major impact on the assumptions used in this study. Currently, just under 50% of the available housing is non-resident occupied. This percentase may well go dawn with the increasing number of 10 telecommuters that are locating in the Truckee area- If it does, the traffic generated per housing unit will increase by the increase in the percentage of full -tune residents. If the percentage doesn't change, there will be an increase in the rate of new home construction to accommodate this unplanned for increase in employment opportunities. I am concerned with the finding that construction of an Eastern Undercrossmg connecting i I with 3R 267 via East River Street precludes the need for a stop Tight at Bridge and I have always felt that the growth projections used were far too conservative, particularly in light of our historical performance. How can we justify an average housing growth rate of 2.3%, or just over 200 homes per year, when during the recession years of 1980- {� 1990 we had annual owth of 6.3%. Our recent history has shown that new home _oa construction is developing at a rate of closer to 350 to 400 homes per rear. My concerns ' are amplified when looking at the housing growth projections for areas outside the DSA of 2878 units or a projected 144 units per year. This is far less than half ofwhar is currewly occurring. Is it reasonable to expect that ,growth will slow down that dramatically, and if it does aor- how will that affect these projections? AIternarives Anaivsis l+fy couce:n expressed in earlier comments is focused on the statement of page 33 which states. "It should be noted that ultimate development of the general plan will result in the need for siana .inion, at a majority of the downtown intersections. regardless of the roadway netwcr',k improvements that are considered. However. since it is difficult to evaluate be'vond the 20 -year time frame. the maior focus of rhe discussion regarding each alternarive relates to the year 20 t 5 olanninz horizon." What if the assumptions which — drive the analysis are wrong? Every Figure showing Alternatives 1 through 8 show a road connecting with SR 267 8 betweea Glenshire Dr. and Church St. Nowhere could I find discussion of how that route would cross Trout Creek, gar was the impact on the existing homes along Trout Creek mentioned. Furthermore, that route appears to align with Upper Jibboom St., which would be physically impossible. Fia,ure A- , - Page 52 I disagree with the assumption that vehicles traveling to Gateway or I-80 Westbound will no longer use the Bridge St. at Bade crossing once the Western Undercrossing is constructed. Other comments: There is another phenomenon occurring, which will have a major impact on the assumptions used in this study. Currently, just under 50% of the available housing is non-resident occupied. This percentase may well go dawn with the increasing number of 10 telecommuters that are locating in the Truckee area- If it does, the traffic generated per housing unit will increase by the increase in the percentage of full -tune residents. If the percentage doesn't change, there will be an increase in the rate of new home construction to accommodate this unplanned for increase in employment opportunities. I am concerned with the finding that construction of an Eastern Undercrossmg connecting i I with 3R 267 via East River Street precludes the need for a stop Tight at Bridge and F7 Commercial Row. Currendy. the most difficult movement in downtown is making a left band tut-- from East River to SR167. How is incressing the number of vehicles attempting that move going improve the situation? A stopl ht at that intersection. automatically triggers installation of a corresponding li6r at Commercial Row due to the safety issues of the at made railroad crossing oerweea them. TNL;kPF PC -2 Initiative Traffic naIvsis ;�vly Issues with this analysis are similar to those identified in the Downtown Circulation Study, The Demographics are based on the General Plan growth projections, which I have been csalleng ng s'mc-they were first presented. The argument to accent them has always bee-- that they would be a baseline estimate which can be trued un as we develop more historic data to use in future projections. Yet here we are, using this questionable estimate as a basis for treasuring the impact of the MAPF initiative on the Town as a whose, but also on the Downtown Specific Plan. The truth of the matter is we do not know what impact will be until we better understand the validity of the assumurions used in projecting those impacts. I The. -e' itself assumes that only a lithe over half of the allocated Commercial and Resort Hotel would be developed by 2015. Where did that assumation came from and is it valid.? One ;grocery store would use up almost 1001'a of the forecasted commercial. The report also assumes that only half of any development would be commercial ;with rhe other half being office and professional. Where did those assumptions come from, and are they valid? I recall in the General Pian discussions we discussed PC -2 accommodating auto -oriented commercial uses which would relieve trarTic on Donner Pass Road with the construction of the third egress out of Tahoe -Donner. Does this analysis reflect that? The assumption was made that Commercial development restricted on PC -2 would be relocated to PC -1. If that is the case. the Baird egress out of Tahoe -Donner will not be ne3riy as af'ective in relieving traffic on Donner Pass Road, and a four lane bridge will most likely be necessary, across I-80. I think it is more likely that more intense auto - oriented Commercial development will occur on the NE11 Site. Current analysis uses mixed use trip generation. Shouldn't we be evaluating Auto Oriented Community 5ervinQ Comtr:ercial trpgeneration rates in this scerrario? Also. will that sort of tntersiried use be consistent with the cora ='ty vision of a Pedestrian Oriented Tourist & Community Serving !rimed Use Development in the DSA. i] 13 14, I,� SYL` ' ER 1=,OENG1NE-1-Q1NG, INC. 11 P L A N �4 E R S I C I V I L a N G N E C R 5 146VACA Clio TAUCXE=- IAugust 11, 1397 Truckee Community Development Department 115 , 0 Bonner Pass Road Truckee, CA 96161 Attn: Tonv L,ashbrook, Community Development Director Re: Downtown Specific Plan Draft EIR Comments S.E.I. File No. 854.9 Dear Tang: The following are concerns regarding the eontcnt of Truckee's Downtown Specific Ptan Draft Environmental Impact Report: Cbaptgr 1: We are coact.—pied that the proposed Downtowns Specific Plan is not a Specific Plan. The Office Planniisg Research (OPR) di5ti--sQuiShes community plans, area plans, and specific plans as different documents. A specific plan is "a hybrid pclic^� St teJllerrl Uird/or. , regulator tool tl at is often used ro badness a single project such as urharr infr`ll develc►pmerrt or a planned community. Asa result, its emphasis is air concrete standards and development criteria to supplement those of the general pian lis text and diagrams address laird use f(including open space), infrastructure, standards for development, and natural resource conservation and implementation measures. " The two primary properties within the Downtown Specific Plan are the ms`ll site and the hilltop property and ye! both- properties are designated as roaster plan areas. Specific 2 development standards and development criteria are not accompanied or specifically defined in the downtown tc xt. Without such, identifying the potential environmental impacts associated with development of these properties is difficult I 101 Prevtcerce +mre Pa. Sucre;= TC64 C=m erc cd Raw. 5uit4& 29 Nevcca Civ. CA 1;5r.69 Truckee. CA 94111 M 1A) iAA-,SPS, I . CAX r91 61 ')&A-A71A (9lei) 582 -JW ug -11-97 04: 7,8P Sylvester Engirziet?^iriti; inn si^ 2S=- 873E P.02 Therefore, it would appear more appropriate that chis plan be entitled "Community" or "Area 2 - Plan" rather than "Specific PIan." Chapter I states that the Draft Ea is a "progi'atrt level" EIR and its intent is to evaluate broad plan policies and their associated environmental irnpac►s. It is intezided to provide specific environuzental analyses so that future Projects can use this base --riviro=erttal information to assess their poreatial impacts_ However, Truckee's Downtown Specific Plan Draft EIR does not contain any specinc site analysis to make such a concept reality. The Draft EIR relies on past studies contained in Truc?cee's General Plan. These studies do not provide sufficient detail to evaluate the cause and effect of impierueµtation of the Downtown Specific Plan. It also does nit allow the public to conclude that development of these properties are obtainable. Without being able to determine what level of development cut actually occur on these properties the potentials to provide redevelopment projects, determine tumzarion fees, and firta-tce public improvements is not realistic. ' The EIR must address the direct and cumulative effects of the potential buildout of ' development proposed on any specific property. Liming the content of this EIR to a 20- year projcc:ian does not allow the public or regulatory agencies the ability to evaluate the realistic Implementation of this plan. Impacts whether direct, indirect or cumulative can only be evaluated based on the full buildout of any proposed prograrn. We surest that the undeveloped areas with=in the Downtown Specific Pian be specified with a type, sire, and location of land uses. so that the true impacts associated with this plarning ' program, can be evaluated. 3rking- The Circulation and Parking Section of the Draft EIR assumes ccrtam improvements will take place i.e., Highway ?67 bypass, Tahoe/Donner connector, and buildout of the mill. site. The only project that has any degree of certainty, at this time, is the Highway 267 bypass. Without commitment in terms of fundinz, right-of-way, and project feasibility for the � Tahoe/Donner connector, we cannot assume this roadway will be in place. Also, without detailed specifications and plans for the mill site and hilltop area, we cannor assume the volumes of trafic to be jererated by these areas and their re?ated incidental impacts such as, air quality, noise, etc. The EIR mus also evaluate the potential impacts without the assumptions specified above_ This is particularly germane since the General Plan Policies restrict or suggest limitation on development outside the Downtown Specific Plan. area. �J 7 a traf�ic ana.ivsis was conducted during the p.m. we_sdav period_ While this is rR , appropriate for planning purposes, Truckee experiences significant traffic congesrion during peak vacation periods. A.s such, e.•nemen- cy response ti3rte is impaired, rhe ability to purchase r, goods and s�rnces is altered, and air quality conditions degrade_ Development of these properties without the assumptions, identified above, being complemented could crate a significant adverse eaviroiunental impact. An analysis of this type would determine if the roadway assumptions are in fact mitiaarion measures for the Downtown Plan or just a separate project. ' Ground water and soil contamination are a. known issue in the downtown area. Sail invesigation on the McManus property is a clear indicator of such. Relying on policies that require soils and ground water investigations be conducted when individual development occurs does not provide anv level of c..7=ry that such issues are not considered si=i.f cant If significant soil contamination does Vis, then development potential for these areas is sigaufrcantly reduced. Tris would directly affect the a'biliry to provide fmancing, establish a redevelopment area, and finance the level of road improvements as identified in the Traffic and Circulation Analvsis. Some degee of specificities is newded to ensure that these areas proposed for development are indeed capable of being developed. Chapter 7 -fir Quo. There does not appear to be an air qualify resource evaluation associated with the actual physical conditions that exist in Truckee at this time. The ©raf, EM relies on the air quality assessmenT contained in the General Plan EIR. However, sianific int changes have occurred since adaption of that plan. The primary concern is die Union Pacific and Southern Pacific Railway merger_ We suggest an Urbernis 3 or simlar analysis be conducted to quantify the particular air quality impacts that will be associated with the intended use. Only then can specific mitigation- measures be apo(led. r Y i !�• A noise assessment should be. conducted that depicts the existing conditions in the downtown area. T'ne EIR is relying on the noise study conducted in Trackee's General Plan. That anaivsis does not reflect the current and fu=e.condifions of increased train traffic resulting from the Union Pacific'Soutae:n Paci:ac merger. ug -•11-97 Ga: ISP 3yiwez-::er E-7G.4nee"Ir-IG Inc 516 255 873,5 P.04 CEQA Guidelines, Section 15125, Sub-Secdon 2, requires that project alternatives be ■ analvzed. Alternatives are for tae purpose of evaluating what changes in the project could ■ lessen environmental impacts. Sub-Secrion C of the above referenc--d CEQA Guidelines Z2 requires Ea's to include sufficient InfQrnation about how each alternative would cause or reduce potential si&nifrcant environmental impacts. Therefore, without appropriate base data to detennine the degree of environmentai impacts, it is impossible to determine what project alternatives could reduce potential impacts. A noise study should include an up to date ambient noise level reading and noise contour mag along the railroad tracks to dere_nnine if the potential uses will coincide with. the General Pian Policies. It is reasonable to believe that noise from increased train cmfnc will be an adverse use d= may have been permissible previously, but would not be permissible under ' tate ctm=::lt and fu=e conditions. Verification from Union Pacific as to the fi=e use should be quantified. Once the ambience is established, then noise modeling can take place to deterr mine which land is significantly impacted from noise polladon and what uses in the plan are appropriate in these t impacted areas. lent noise le els ma A noise study that depicts existing amb s noise sensitive areas, and list p mitigation measures to reduce noise ,impacts is appropriate to determine- whether the proposed land uses identified in the plan are in fact achievable. Without such a noise study significant adverse impacts may occur. chapcgr.9 i i 1Scenic it did`rtot appear that a Biological Inventory In rune N1ng the content of the' Draft EIIt Pp r3' or Site Reconnaissance was conducted to detertr n6 the biological sensitivity of lands within the Oowntown Plan. This is pe.unent to areas along Trout Creek and the Trucks-. liver Corridor. Identification of flood hazard areas, potential wetland areas and sensitive wildlife l j habitar in these corridors is important to detennine whether anticipated buildout in the plan will adversely effect these areas. We suggest that a Biologicai' Inventory and an Environinental Constraints Map be prepared to identify general areas of concern. Without such base information this document is not suitable for -ti =.a- for future environmental assessments. p. Ch:QW CE�AIternatives; CEQA Guidelines, Section 15125, Sub-Secdon 2, requires that project alternatives be ■ analvzed. Alternatives are for tae purpose of evaluating what changes in the project could ■ lessen environmental impacts. Sub-Secrion C of the above referenc--d CEQA Guidelines Z2 requires Ea's to include sufficient InfQrnation about how each alternative would cause or reduce potential si&nifrcant environmental impacts. Therefore, without appropriate base data to detennine the degree of environmentai impacts, it is impossible to determine what project alternatives could reduce potential impacts. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 in the primary areas identified for development in the Downtown Specific Plan area have not be -...a aaalyzed to sufficient degree of detail to determine; 1) if these areas are capable of development; 2) what leve! of 'development can occur in these areas; 3) to what 13 die i.nfi-astructure and improvements would be reduced if these areas are not developed to their full potential; and 4) what is the cause and effect of reducing development ou areas outside the Downtown Specific Pian if these properties cannot be developed to their full potential. Specific studies in noise, air quality, traffic, soil: contamination, and an biological invesrigaaon are needed to fully evaluate the cause and effect of impl=nentation of this plan.. Very truly yours, SYL VESTER ENGiNEERiNG, LNC. i Dale T. Creighton, A.i.C_P. Mice President DTC:Sb. 'Ri1i"I r_�4 tl cht:� 1 'r'1t.1NSPOR rA I()N rt.nNNIAK; TRAFFtf; rN+ciYr2:a:rvc roNsaTLTANI—i 2690 tike Forest Fiend PO Pox WS Tahoe City, CA 75145 9161583-46S FAX. 91V -q3-5%6 TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM DATE. SepterTnber 2.1997 TO: ELzabeth. Eddins, Dirc=r of Planning, Town of Trucket FROM: Daniel P. Wilkins, F.E. SUBJECT: South R.ivcr StrectlBridge Street Traffic Analysis ZN TR O D U CTI O NIS U NLNIARY As requcsted, LSC, Inc. has performed a traffic analysis of the South River Street/Bridge Street inrersecrion in the Town of Truckcc. The purpose of the analysis was to evaluate the potential for traf is impacts that could he caused by development on South River Stre-et both to the east and `o the west of 5ndge Street. To perform this analysis, LSC, Inc. evaluated three development scenarras, as follows: • Exis Ina Conditions (14 Single Family Dwelling Units (SFDU's) to the west ai Bridge Street, and l6 SFDU's to the east of Bridge She-_t)- 2015 heet)_24l5 conditions assuming the land Use projections in the Town of Truckee year 20 15 traffic model. To the west of Bridge Street this cassis of development of a cvl iuriny park, development'of44 Multi Family Dwelling Units (MFDU's); and deJeiQgment of an additional 3 SFDU's. To the cast of Bridge Strect, this includes development of 2 additional SFDU's, and construction of a limited amount of community commercial space. ' • 2015 conditions assuming an expanded 1cvc! of developmtint, that would include all lard use ;de-nnBcd in the year 2015 transportation model and an additional I � SFDU's and a iD room resort lintel to the west of Bridge Strctt. TO the east of Bridge Street, all land use would remain the same zm in the Town of Truckee Year 2015 T rafiic Model. YCM LSC Tahoe FE -UNE No. Sep. 01 1557 71: 44FM F'2 . - 9 South Five-, btreA..JF3rzdge Stre�-.� Traffic Page 7 _ September ?, 1937 To per the analysis. LSC:. Inc. determined trip gene-ation distribution, t p s rioution, ana asstg�:raent for each of the above development scenarios. Trip generation rates `or each oFtine land use categories , identified above were obtained, from the Tawe, of Truckee transportation de. -nand model, with the exception of the lodging land useripe, for which trip ;ene;Mtion rates we— obtained from the ITE Trip Generarion Manual 5th Edition (as there is no specific rate for this Iand use type in the Town's ' modcl) 71he trip gene:adon rates were than applied to the laud use quantities identifiers for each of the three land use scenarios- Table l presents trip anneration estimates for each of the alternatives 17 considered. 1 The trip generation estimates were thea distributed to the roadway network assuming that 75 percc:it of the traffic accessing South River Street would be oriented northward towards downtown Truckce, ' with the rernaining 23 percent oriented southward towards Marts Valley; this distribution is consistent with other traffic studies conducted along this corridor. Thorough .movements along Bridge Street were estimated by determining the coca] arrival and dep€irture volumes on the southera Bridge Street leg of the 13ridge Street/West River Street intersection. It was assumed that the Stye Route 267 Bypass, the Western Underpass, and the Tahoe Donner connection to Bridge Street would ' all be in place for the year 2015 roadway network assumptions. Tus corresponds to Alternative I of the,Downrown Truck --c Circulation .Study performed by LSC, Inc in 1996. Estimated turning, move:�enrs at the Brio c Street/South River Street � ' b reet intersection for each of the three development scenarios are presented in Figure I. These turning movements were evaluated using the Highway Capacity Softwa_,c to determine intersection Icvcls-ox-service(LOS} assuming each of the three development scenarios. Table 2 presents the results of the intersection LOS. As shown in Table 2, existing intersection LOS is LOS A. Under the year ?(315 land use scenario , identified in the Truckee Downtown Circulation Study, SOS is expected to deteriorate to LOS B, with LCIS F rnove:nents occurring for eastbound left urging movements. Under the modified Year 2015 lana use scenario, LOS would deteriorate to LOS D; again, a LOS of 1 would be provided for eastbound left turning traft-c_ For the Year "015 traffic analysis, it is assumed that the eastbound South River Str r approach to ' Bridge Street would be striped with a left turn pocket, as well as a throttghlright tura lane. This improvement could be accomplished within existing right-of-way, and possibly within rhe existing pavement width through the addition of lane striping. Although it was not asstmed for this trac ' analysis, it may also be desirable from a safety standpoirit to provide a northbound left turn pocket for traffic traveling from northbound Bridge Street to westbound South Rive. Streyt. 71 -his immoverrent should. however, be evaluated more carefully through a detailed traffic analysis which would be required of any sizeable development proposal located along trite South River Street corridor. ' We trust that this analysis is helpful ir. evaluating, the ramifications associated with the potential change of land use along South River Stmet to the west of Bridge Street. We would be happy to address any questions or concerns you or others may have regarding our methodology or conclusions. Thank you for this opportunity to -assist the Town of Truckee. B:tSRk-SRN, ,-�QRT.tro th! A r- a ca e _4 _4 AL � - e0 in ., c � a . � CIO, .§� C4o- LLJ � a ca e AL � e0 in c � a . � CIO, .§� C4o- LLJ � .g � } . ® $ � } � 2 � & = � $ � J a ca e c CIO, C4o- LLJ .g � } . ® } � & � $ � iC;" - L5C i ahC.e PHCNE X10. : g165c=,sEc Sep. 01 1SC- 01:477 F5 r 4 S3 f6i�l� 61 � I C7� 44 .l r Cy � d w K1 C N tLi iI. I 1 i .t !17 O d Q %n Ij a5 f � 'SOS 10 � N Mul � x �lY I N f '= C r C CL N a N LO [v ' cc ? Y c+1 Q yy tn 3.0 z. w m 47 Rte -0 m uj IA to W s(s C] N a" C in ® cp C � tit M U J Z z Z t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i South River S1reVvEridge Street Traffic Page 3 September 2. 1997 TABLE 1: Bridge SlrealSouth River Strut Lv;el of Service Sumnwry Intersection Scenario Delay LOS (SeclVeh� Eaisriag Conditions 0.1 A Eastbound Approach 22.3 I O I Westbound Approac.� 12.4 C Northbound leli Turn .5.3 B Southbotmd lcfc turn 4.9 I A I Year 1015 Traffic Model � 6.4 B IEastbound lei turn � 199.0 F Eastbound rhrough and right torn 9. ,4 'Westbound Auproach 18.6 C Northbound left tura I 7.1 � B Southbound left turn 4.9 A Modified Year 2015 I 22.7 D i Eastbound Zeit turn 558.6 I F Eastbound tf=ougft and richt turn 9.8 13 Westbound Approach 19.3 C Niorthbound left tum I 7.4 Southbound let turn' f 4.9 I A I Source: LSC. inc. B. Corrections and Additions to the Draft EIR 1. Revise DEIR: Page 7-3 as follows: According to the Truckee General Plan, approximately 1445 tons of PMio is currently generated each year on a Town -wide basis. `° a;;ate► . r<ync•�1eti •.,r , ...�,r �,,,.-.; . � 'CYLl CCrfC�S' 8 [ZTTL�. itYy-rLS -' - liag. ' ' 5 a;aotie f .10 w0 113 e P"1� pI�QE'O[SO1T©•Y'S4 c r� tD e'aiCah Z'eaf, an th@ aver-ageResidential wavdstoves are a major source ofPM10 pollution. Given the proposed residential buildout of the DSA of over 600 dwelling units, the additional PMio to be generated from this source at buildout would be nearly 15 tons per year. Actual levels should be substantially less than this because of further mitigation measures such as restrictions on the number of chimneys permitted per residential unit and new EPA standards for woodstoves. Nevertheless, associated impacts would still be significant. Road dust °` and construction activities % are the other major contributors to PMio levels. Construction and demolition might produce a higher percentage of the DSA's particulate matter during the build out phases of plan development, as this type of activity will likely be intensive (but short term) at certain times. Respirable particulate matter that originates as road dust will likely account for less then half of the increase in MO generated in the DSA, because of the relatively small amount of new road -miles proposed (as well as the low travel speeds that occur) within the DSA. Vehicular emissions sources for account for only 22,40 a small portion of the Mo o generated on a Town -wide basis. 2. The fallowing attachments provide information which is appended to the Draft EIR subsequent to its circulation in order to address issues raised during public hearings. This information clarifies the information contained in the Draft EIR and does not represent significant new information requiring recirculation of the Draft EIR. Exhibit B-1 — South River Street Traffic Analysis by LSC Exhibit 8-2 -- Analysis of Highway 267 Ramp Closure by LSC 3. The following additional mitigation measure is added to the Final EIR: Should the 1-801 Hwy 267 ramps be closed by Caltrans, any nonresidential development project within the bSA over 10, 000 square feet in size, or any residential project over 30 units in size, will be required to do a subsequent tri, is ana vsis prior to approval to ' ensure that traffic impacts are adequately evaluated and mitigated. Attachment B — Final EIR Page 13 t 1 1 1 t '1-ttAlY4?f)R_'A'1 10N ?t., NNTfV(: & TRA F;1C rN1 r1NFZR1NC CONSULTANTS '2690 Laky Forest nand PO Box 5175 Trhor City, CA 96145 91614-93-4053 PAY_ q 16i583-5'%6 TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM DATE: September 2, 1997 TO: Elizabeth Eddins, Director of Planning, Town ol'Truckee FROM: Daniel P. Wilkins, P.E_ STJBjL• CT: South River StrecJBridge Street Traffic , lialysis INTRODUCTIONiSUi LNIARY As requested, LSC, inc, has performed a traffic analysis of the South Rive: Street/Bridge Street intersection in the Town of Truckee. The purpose of the analysis was to evaluate the potential for traffic impacts :hat could be caused by deveiopmeat.on South River Scree: both to the east and to the west of Bridge Street. To perform this analysis, LSC, Inc. evaluated threq development scenarios, as follows: • Existing Conditions (14 Single Faxnily Dwelling Units (SFDU's) to the west of Bridge Street, and 15 SFDU's to the east of Bridge Street). • 2015 conditions assuming the land use proje4 ions in the Town of Truckee year 20t5 traffic model. 'To the west of Bridge Street this consists of development of a cOrnnzunity park, deveiopme-r'lt of 44 Multi Family Dwelling Units (2MFDU's), and development of an addidonal 3 SFDU's. To the =St of Bridge Street, this includes developmenr of 2 .additional SFDU's, and construction of a limited amount of community commercial space. 2015 conditions assuming an cxpwidcd (erel ofdevelcermunt, that would include all land use identified in d, e year 2015 tmnsponation model and an additional 13 SFDU's and a 70 room resort hotel to the west of Bridge Street To the east of Bridge Street, all land use would remain the same as in the Town of Truckee Year 2015 Traffic Model.. ROM L,SC i ahce r`• -'CNE NO - South t`Zive: StrcetfBridge Street Traffic 51C�Z275S66 Sep. 221 1597 01:44PM P2 Page 2 September 2, 1997 To per -Form the analysis. LSC. inc. determine: ti -4 eerieration, distribution, and =ignmenr for each of the above development sc--=los. Trip generation rates For each of the land use categories idenr tied above were obtained frorn the Towa of Truckee transportation demand model, with the exception of the lodging land use type, for which trip ;eae.atian rates wen: obtained from the IT'S Trip Gene,— tion _ anual 5th Edition (as there is no specific ;ate 5,or this Sand use type in the Town's model) The trip on. cration rates were diad applied to the land use qua.nttties identified for Lath of the three land use scenarios. Table l presents trip gen..cratioa esd=tes far each of the alie:nauves considered. The trip generation eszniates were then distributed to the roadway networt assuming that 75 cercdnt of rhe traffic accessing South Rive. Street would be oriented northward towards downtown Truckee with the remaining 25 percent oriented southward towards Martis Valley; this distribution is consistent with other traffic studies conducted along this corridor. Through inoveme.^.ts :lon2 Bridge Street were estimated by de'.vrrnining the total arrival and departure volumes Qn the southern Bridge Street leg of the Bridge Street/West River Street intersection. It was assumed :hat the Stagy Route 267 Bypass, the Western Unde. ,ass, and the Tahoe Donner c nncc.ion to Bridge Street would all be in place for the year 2015 roadway network assumptions. This co-esponds to Alternative l or the -Downtown T'ruek,-c Circulation Srua.v performed by LSA::, Inc in 1996. Estimated. turning movernienrs at the Bridgc StreetfS0uth Rave, Street intersection for each of the three deve?oprnent scenarios are presented in Figure 1. These turning rnoveme;tts were evaluated using the Highway Capacity Software to determine intersection levels-oi servjice (LQ$j assuming each of the three development scenarios. Table 2 presents the results of the intersection IDS. As shown iri Table 2, existing intersection LOS is LOS A. Under the year 2015 land use scenario identified in the Truckee Downtown Circulation Study, LOS is expected to deteriorate to LOS B, with LOS F movements occurring for eastbound left turning movern-ents_ lirider the modified Year 2015 lana: use scenario, LOS would deteriorate to LOS D-, again, a LOS of F would be provided for eastbound left turning traffic. For the Shear -_,015 traffic analysis, it is assumed that the eastbour;d South River Street approach to Bridge Street would be striped with a left turn pocket, as well as a through/right turn lane... This improvement could be accamplished within existing right-of-way, and possibly widiin me-xisting paveinent width through the addition of lane striping. Although it was not assumed for this tmir, analysis, it may also be desirable from a safety standpoint to provide a northbound left turn uockat for traff-ic traveling fi•oin northbound Bridge Street to westbound South River Street. This irnprovemenr should, however, be evaluated more carefully through a detaiied traffic analysis which would be required of any sizeable development proposal located along he South River Stree corridor-. We trust that [his analysis is helpful in evaluating the ramifications associated with the potential change of land use along South Rive. Street to the west of Bridge Street. We would be happy to address any questions or concerns you or others_ may have regarding our methodology or conclusions. Thank'you for this opportunity to assist the Town of Truckee. EA.1,RV5RRE-30 tT.MZ;.M 7 t 11 I 1 L fl 11 t 2 5 d ^ . k s f � z a ■ � _ � � o 2 5 ! k f � z a � S . o � E � � �- � ® 2 V J ~ f � � �q j . 7 04 ` @ � � ■ ¢ A.0 2 � - � � 2 . � @ � � ~ f •� � . - �§ o � ; _ � � £ f @ � � LL / � � � � ¥ . _cz % � � PHCINE ING. 131e5-ZZ35GE Ser- 01 1557 $I: 4. -,Ph•! FS +a m w ca a � aj Q em , " 4 m Q ti C w a C7 ff ' �1 i r e NC{ `m Q � 4? a• PT d C O �'! L3 rD d m u7 d d O u7 W C3 �c x - N (D `v - CI eye ry a "" m m m p��a ca ni v e •[G i 47 ui 7D- mNr � ca +Jl w N z y y ?V C cr c Q tL! LCl� c O 41j co T O v q' c Y ...-. Di=� 4`7 SV A a Q 1 em r r mer N G7 ^ LU I lm 1l o � a j rt7 �, LU O y t9 _ } - QE7 y 7; r +. �� ca 0 L6 u' m a c ?m a -j w em c° ° z South Fiver Street/Bridge Street TraF;tc Page 3 September z. 1997 TABLE 1: Brr"dg, a Street/South River Street ,Leve! of Service Summary Inters ion Scenario Delay LOS (SeclVehj Existing Conditions 0.1 A Eastbound Approach Westbound Aoproac;t ;? Northbound left tum S.3 B Southbound left turn I 4.9 + A Year 2015 Traffic Model � 5.4 � Eastbound ler tura LI 99. 0 F Eastbound through and right turn 9.4 is Wesrbound Approach 18.6 C Northbound !eft tura 7 1 3 Southbound left turn 4.9 A Ml odified Year 2015 22.7 D Eastbound left tum 558.6 F Eastbound through and right turn 93 I3 Westbound Approach � 19.8 C Northbound lel turn � 7.4 B 5omeh1baund lent tum f 4.9 A Source: LSC, Frac t t TRANSPORTATION PLANNING & TRAFFIC FANGMEEREVG C©NSU1 T CMTS 2690 Lake Forest Road P'0 Box 3875 Tahoe City, CA 96145 9161583-4033 F.A.X. 91615&3-5966 TECHNICAL MEMORANDUM DATE: October 6, 1997 TO: Tony Lashbrook, Community Development .Director, Town of Truckee FROM: Daniel P. Wilkins, P.E. SUBJECT: State Route 267 Bypass/Interstate 80 Interchange Design Traffic Issues INTRODUCTION As requested, LSC, Inc. has performed an analysis of traffic issues related to three interchange alternatives at the Interstate 80/proposed State Route 267 Bypass Interchange. The interchange alternatives evaluated were as follows: Interim Interchange Design - This is the design that was proposed by Caltrans approximately four years ago, that was assumed for the traffic analysis in the Downtown Specific Pian. Thi9s design does not contain a direct connection from the proposed State Route 267 Bypass to State Route 89 north. A schematic of this design is shown in Figure 1. Ultimate Interchange Design - This is the design that Caltrans is currently - proposing, which includes a split diamond interchange with two lane on and off ramps between Interstate 80 and the State Route 267 Bypass. Under this design, the existing State Route 267/Interstate 80 interchange would be eliminated. This design is intended to accommodate a four lane cross section of the State Route 267 Bypass at a point in the future when the Bypass is widened. A'schematic of this design is shown in Figure 2. Modified Ultimate Interchange Design - This is a design which would modify the Ultimate Interchancre design to allow the existing State Route 267/Interstate 80 eastbound off and westbound on ramps to remain in place. A schematic of this design is shown in Figure 3. Mr. Tony Lashbrook Page 2 October 6, 1997 In order to perform a quantitative analysis of the traffic flow implications of each of the above alternatives, the roadway link network in the Town of Truckee Transportation Demand Model used upon the Tmode12 Software Package) was coded to represent each of the above design alternatives. The year 2015 land use database was then used in conjunction with the coded link network to evaluate travel trends in the historic downtown area of Truckee for each of the design alternatives. For this analysis, it was assumed that the western underpass, and the Tahoe Donner connector roads to Bridge Street and Highway 89 north were in place as part of the 20 year roadway network. Estimated roadway link volumes for the Interim, Ultimate, and Modified Ultimate Interchange designs are presented in Figures 1 through 3. GOMCPARISON OF ALTERNATIVES Ultimate Interchange Design The link volumes presented in Figure 1 (Interim Interchange design) represent the traffic volume data used in the Truckee Downtown Circulation Study, and therefore reflect traffic data used in developing the Truckee Downtown Specific Plan.. Link volumes presented in Figure 2 (Ultimate Interchange Design) represent expected year 2015 traffic volumes assuming the currently planned State Route 267 Bypass interchange design. Figure 4 presents the absolute and percentage change in traffic volumes between the Interim and Ultimate Interchange configurations. As shown, the Ultimate Interchange design configuration creates a substantial shift in travel patterns through Downtown Truckee. The following presents a listing of major shifts in traffic volumes between Interim and Ultimate Interchange configurations: East-West Travel - With the Ultimate Interchange, traffic from the Mill Site and the Glenshire and Olympic Heights subdivisions destined for the Interstate 80 corridor west of Historic Downtown would predominantly travel through the Historic Downtown via. Commercial Row and the Central Truckee freeway interchange. This is due to the increased travel distance required to access the Interstate 80/State Route 267 Bypass interchange from these areas, which creates a redistribution of traffic under. the Ultimate Interchange design. The increased travel distance to access the Interstate is approximately 3/4 of a mile in length with additional turning movements required at intersections. If it is assumed that an average travel speed of 30 miles per hour can be maintainted along the roadway sections and through the intersections, this would result in an increase in travel time of 1 minute and 30 seconds over existing conditions. This is a significant enough increase to cause the aforementioned shift in travel paths to occur. Under the Interim Interchange design, this traffic is predominantly oriented to the existing State Route 2671 Interstate 80 Interchange. The Ultimate Interchange Design reduces traffic on Interstate 80 between the Central Truckee and existing State Route 267/Interstate 80 interchanges and increases traffic along Commercial Row in the t t t t t t t Mr. Tony Lashbrook Page 3 October 6, 1997 Historic Downtown District. This results in an increase in east -west traffic volumes of between 310 and 337 vehicles per hour (depending on location) along Commercial Row over the interim interchange design. an a percentage basis, this represents an increase of 31 to 57 percent. • North-South Travel - With the Ultimate Interchange, traffic from the Tahoe -Donner subdivision bound to and from Martis Valley would be more likely to use the State Route 267 Bypass than with the Interim Interchange design. This is due to the added convenience that the Ultimate Interchange provides via the connection to State Route 89 north. This results in a decrease in north -south traffic volumes of 163 vehicles per hour across the existing Bridge Street at -grade railroad crossing, representing aspproximately 16 percent of total traffic volume on this link. • Bridge Street/Commercial Row Intersection Traffic Volumes - This intersection is of particular importance as it meters tragic flow through the historic downtown area. As discussed above, east -west traffic volumes increase ;and north -south traffic volumes decrease at this intersection when comparing the Ultimate and interim Interchange designs. Total traffic volume through the intersection would increase by 174 vehicles per hour with the Ultimate design. As you know, the existing intersection has a non-standard three-way stop control, with the northbound approach to the intersection having right-of-way over each of the remaining three approaches. This intersection control was established to reduce the likelihood of northbound traffic being stopped on the Union Pacific Railroad tracks, which are located approximately 100 feet south of the intersection. The Ultimate Interchange design would reduce traffic volumes on the non-stop controlled approach to the intersection by 168 vehicles per hour, while increasing traffic volumes on the stop controlled approaches by 342 vehicles per hour over the Interim Interchange design. Modified Ultimate Interchange Design Link volumes presented. in Figure 3 Modified Ultimate Interchange Design) represent expected year 2015 traffic volumes assuming the currently planned bypass interchange design and retaining the existing eastbound off and westbound on -ramps at the State Route 267/Interstate 80 Interchange. Figure 5 presents the absolute and percentage change in traffic volumes between the Interun and Modified Ultimate Interchange configurations. Figure 6 presents the absolute and percentage change in traffic volumes between the Ultimate and Modified Ultimate Interchange configurations. As shown, the Modified Ultimate Interchange design configuration reduces traffic volumes in the historic downtown area for both north -south and east -west traffic movements. The following presents a listing of major shifts in travel patterns between interchange configurations: t Mr. Tony Lashbrook . . Page 4 October 6, 1997 1 East-West Travel - With the Modified Ultimate Interchange, traffic generated by the Old Mill Site and the Glenshire and Olympic Heights subdivisions, which is destined for the interstate 80 corridor to the west of Downtown, would tend to use the existing eastbound off and westbound on -ramps at the existing State Route 267/Interstate 80 interchange as this would require less travel time than travel along Commercial Row. The retention of these ramps eliminates the circuitous access patterns between these geographic areas which would be created by the Ultimate Interchange Design. This would have the effect of reducing traffic volumes along the Commercial Row Corridor from the Ultimate Interchange design by 354 to 400 vehicles per hour (34 to 40 percent). Resulting traffic volumes would actually be slightly lower than those assumed in the Truckee Downtown Circulation Study. North-South Travel - With the Modified Ultimate Interchange, traffic from the Tahoe -Donner subdivision bound to and from Martis Valley would be more likely to use the State Route 267 Bypass than with the Interim Interchange design. This is due to the added convenience that the Modified Ultimate Interchange provides via the connection to State Route 89 north. This results in a decrease in north -south traffic volumes of 215 vehicles per hour across the existing Bridge Street at -grade railroad crossing. On a percentage basis, this represents a decrease of 32 percent in the northbound direction, and 7 percent in the southbound direction over the Interim Interchange design. North-South traffic flows are very similar between the Modified Ultimate and Ultimate Interchange configurations Bridge Street/Commercial Row Intersection Traffic Volumes - As discussed above, both east -west and north -south traffic volumes decrease at this intersection when comparing the Modified Ultimate and Interim Interchange designs. Total traffic volume through the intersection would decrease by 250 vehicles per hour, mostly due to the reduction in north -south volumes. The Ultimate Interchange design would reduce traffic volumes on the non-stop controlled approach to the intersection by 154 vehicles per hour, and decrease traffic volumes on the stop controlled approaches by 86 vehicles per hour over the Interim Interchange design. When compared to the Ultimate Interchange design, the Modified Ultimate Design would reduce total traffic volume by 424 vehicles per hour through this intersection. To put this in perspective, Table I presents total intersection volume through the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection for existing conditions and each of the alternatives under consideration: As shown, existing traffic volumes at this intersection are 1,731 vehicles per hour. It should be noted that this represents near capacity conditions through this intersection, as evidenced by extensive queuing which occurs at this intersection during peals F Mr. Tony Lashbrook Page 5 October 6, 1997 demand periods. As is also shown, the year 2015 Ultimate Interchange demand scenario would result in a traffic demand increase of 325 vehicles per hour over existing conditions, while the Modified Ultimate Interchange design would reduce existing demand at this intersection by nearly 100 vehicles per hour. Table 1: Bridge Street/Couranercial Row Traffic Volume Comparison Scenario Total Hourly Intersection Traffic Volume Change From Existing Emsting Conditions 1,731 Year 2015 Interim Interchange 1,882 X151 Year 2415 Ultimate Interchange Year 2015 Modified Ultimate Interchange 2,056 1,632 +325 -99 ' IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES/STRATEGIES Retention of the emsting eastbound off and westbound on -ramps would provide significant circulation benefits to the Historic Downtown area by maintaining a convenient Interstate 80 portal to the Old Mill Site and Glenshire and Olympic Heights Subdivisions. Absent these ramps, the preferred east -west travel route across the Historic Downtown area would be along Commercial Row instead of the Interstate 80 corridor. This has the effect of diverting east -west regional traffic flow from the Interstate 80 corridor, and through the Historic Downtown area, and the Bridge - Street'Comercial Row intersection (which is the most congested intersection in the Town of Truckee). Interchange Spacing The two primary issues related to maintaining the existing eastbound off' and westbound on -ramps are Caltrans design guidelines which discourage construction of partial interchanges and guidelines which suggest a two mile spacing between successive interchanges. In relation to the guideline which discourages construction of partial interchanges, it has been our understanding that the primary reason for this guideline is that motorists who exit Interstate 80 eastbound (to purchase gas, for instance) and wish to immediately regain access to the Interstate are unable to do so because the interchange does not accommodate the reentry movement. It is argued that this in tum can cause motorists to try and gain access to the interstate via the exit ramp, creating a hazardous situation. In this instance, maintaining the eastbound off and westbound on -ramps while abandoning the existing eastbound on and westbound off -ramps would create a partial diamond interchange. However, it must be recognized that the eastbound on and westbound off movements can still be accommodated at the proposed State Route 267 Bypassaterstate 80 interchange (Where these movements would occur whether or not the existing ramps remain). The increased danger of wrong i 1 Mr. Tony Lashbrook Page 6 October 6, 1997 1 way movements at the partial interchange could be minimized by providing adequate signing in the vicinity of the partial interchange that would direct eastbound traffic to the proposed Bypass interchange located 112. mile away. A similar condition exists along the SR 49120 Golden Center Freeway in Nevada City. In relation to the guideline which encourages interchange spacing of two miles in rural areas, it is my understanding that this is driven primarily by freeway operational issues and a desire to eliminate weaving and lane overloads which can occur in tight interchange spacing. A secondary consideration regarding interchange spacing is the provision of adequate signing for successive interchanges. In regard to these points, it should be recognized that maintaining the existing eastbound off and westbound on ramps would not create a weaving section on the freeway. It would, however, create successive on -ramps and successive off -ramps very similar in spacing to what would occur at a partial cloverleaf interchange. From the freeway users perspective this interchange would be similar to a partial cloverleaf interchange in the westbound direction. In the eastbound direction the ramp configuration would also be similar to a partial cloverleaf configuration with the deviation that the signing for the successive off -ramps would call for two separate destinations (IE. Historic Truckee and State Route 2.67/Lake Tahoe). Ramp Spacing Another issue driving the ramp closures is related to ramp spacing, and auxiliary lane additions necessary to accommodate a two lane off -ramp in the eastbound direction, and a two lane on-ramp in the westbound direction. According to Caltrans standards, it is desirable to maintain ramp spacing of approximately 114 mile between off -ramps (although the minimum identified in the Caltrans Highway Design Manual is 1,000 feet). Minimum spacing between on -ramps should also be approximately 1,204 feet. Eastbound Off Ramps As discussed above, the eastbound off ramp proposed in the current Caltrans design calls for a two- lane off -ramp. Based upon the Town of Truckee Travel Demand Model, traffic demand on the eastbound off -ramp is 371 vehicles per hour during peak Summer demand periods assuming the Ultimate Interchange configuration. Note that a typical single lane off -ramp is capable of handling 1,600 to 1,800 vehicles per hour, and a two lane off -ramp is capable of Dandling approximately 3,000 vehicles per hour. Based upon this information, it would seem that the two lane ramp is not required from a traffic capacity standpoint, assuming 20 year traffic forecasts (although a two lane cross section may be required beyond that time frame if the Bypass is widened to four lanes). The two lane design may be driven by a construction staging issue which would temporarily use the freeway ramps as the freeway mainline during the time period that the freeway overpass of the proposed Bypass alignment is being constructed. For this reason, we -have assumed that the two-lane off -ramp will be required as a part of the overall project. If it is truly a construction staging issue which drives the two lane ramp cross section, it would be possible to construct the ramp as a two lane cross sectionfor construction staging, but t t t Ll 11 Mr. Tony Lashbrook Page 7 October 6, 1997 stripe the ramp as a single lane diverge for final freeway operations. This would eliminate the need for freeway widening required to develop a two lane off ramp to Caltrans Design Standards. This would also allow the existing eastbound off -ramp to remain open with minor realignment of the nose of the ramp to create adequate spacing between the diverge points on the successive off -ramps. If the two lane ramp is to remain under final freeway operations (as presented in current design plans), it would be necessary to develop an additional lane along the edge of the existing freeway (referred to as an auxiliary lane) which would allow the two lane ofd ramp to function properly. The development of this auxiliary lane would require modification of the existing off -ramp, as portions of the existing off -ramp are located where the new auxiliary lane would be constructed. It would, however, be possible to relocate the "nose' or gore point of the existing off -ramp approximately 300 feet to the west so that the gore point of the existing off -ramp would intersect with the edge of the proposed auxiliary lane. This design would require extension of the proposed auxiliary lane approximately 1,200 feet to the west of the currently planned terminus. The design would provide approximately 1,200 feet of spacing between the successive off -ramps (in accordance with Caltrans Design: Standards), and it appears that all improvements could occur within existing Caltrans Right -of Way. This last point would need to be verified through a more detailed design process, as the drawings that we were working from did not provide adequate detail as to property line locations. Field surveys of the area, however, indicate that these improvements could be accomplished within existing right -of --way. Westbound On -Ramp As with the proposed eastbound off -ramp, the proposed westbound on-ramp from the proposed State Route 267 Bypass to westbound Interstate 80 is currently planned as a two lane ori -ramp. This would provide substantially more on-ramp capacity than the Bypass could deliver, As a two-lane on-ramp requires a substantially longer distance for merging, the on-ramp does not fully merge onto the freeway until a point approximately 1,200 feet west of the merge point of the existing westbound ars-ramp. A portion of the existing on-ramp would have to be replaced by lane additions required for construction of the proposed on-ramp, thereby necessitating elimination of the existing on-ramp. In order to maintain the existing westbound on-ramp,'the proposed ramp could be redesigned as a hook ramp as shown in the State Route 267 Design Alternatives mento submitted to the Town of Truckee by LSC, Inc. approximately two weeks ago. This would allow the existing westbound on- ramp to remain in its existing location. It should be noted that the capacity of the proposed hook- rarx!p would be approximately 1,500 vehicles per hour, and possibly less if freeway mainline volumes are high at the merge point. By comparison, the capacity of the proposed two lane on-ramp would be approximately 3,000 vehicles per hour. It_ should be noted that the existing on-ramp (which has a capacity of 1,600 to 1,800 vph) would remain, so that the combined ori -ramp capacity to the freeway would remain approximately the same. The hook ramp design could be improved in the future by modifying the merge point to the freeway into a lane addition, which would increase total, ramp capacity. 1 Mr. Tony Lashbrook Page 8 October 5, 1997 1 A potential negative aspect of the hook ramp design is that it requires the planned freeway overpass structure to be approximately 15 to 18 feet wider than is shown in the current design plans. The additional width is necessary to accommodate the on-ramp across the structure. Even if the ]soak ramp were not to be built at this time, it may be desirable to provide the additional structure width to, allow for a loop ramp addition in the future, which Caltrans has identified as a probable long term need. It should also be noted that although the structure costs would be higher with this alternative, roadway widening along the freeway would be much less extensive, thereby reducing that portion of the project cost. The construction staging for this alternative would be modified from the proposed Caltrans design. As mentioned previously, construction staging plans currently call for the proposed freeway ramps to be temporarily used as Interstate 80 while the existing Interstate 80 alignment is being regraded and the Interstate 80 structures over the proposed bypass alignment are built. With the hook ramp alternative, this staging concept would not be possible for the westbound ramps. It would instead be necessary to construct the Interstate 80 structures in two phases, with the eastbound structure, in conjunction with the eastbound ramps, being constructed first. At this point, the eastbound ramps could be designated as eastbound Interstate 80, and the eastbound mainline could be temporarily designated as westbound Interstate 80. This would also require temporary pavement transitions to be built between the existing eastbound and westbound mainlines. At this point, the westbound structure and ramps could be constructed free of interference of Interstate 80 mainline traffic. Another alternative to the hook ramp design would be to maintain the split diamond configuration proposed in the Caltrans Design. This would allow Caltrans to implement its original construction phasing plan. However, instead of the westbound on-ramp being a two lane on-ramp for final freeway operations, it could be striped as'a standard one lane on-ramp with a merge. This would eliminate the need for a lane addition on the freeway, while still maintaining the current construction L staging plan, and allowing the existing westbound on-ramp to remain in its existing location (although the nose of the existing ramp may also require reconfiguration to obtain adequate on-ramp spacing). It should be pointed out that this design would not preclude freeway widening from occuring in the future to accomodate two lane on ramps when either the bypass is widened to four lanes, or traffic volumes dictate the need for this improvement. IMPLICATIONS TO THE DOWNTOWN SPECIFIC PLAN As discussed above, the Interium Interchange design was assumed in all circulation studies performed during the.development of the Downtown Specific Plan. As such, the traffic volumes which the Downtown Circulation Study was based upon are different than those which would Occur with the Ultimate and Modified Ultimate interchange designs. With the Modified Ultimate interchange design, traffic volumes at critical intersections in the Downtown Study Area are comparable or lower than those identified in the Downtown Circulation Study. t 1 t �I Mr. Tony Lashbrook Page 9 October 6, 1997 With the Ultimate interchange design, traffic volumes along Bridge Street are lower, but traffic volumes along Commercial Row are substantially higher than those identified in the Downtown Circulation Study. Based upon preliminary analysis, the level of traffic demand that would be generated along Commercial Row with the Ultimate interchange design could be mitigated at the Commercial Row/Bridge Street intersection through construction of improved intersection geometry and installation of a traffic signal. This is the same conclusion that was identified for this intersection in the Downtown Circulation Study for the year 2015 traffic demand estimates. Construction of the Ultimate interchange would, however, require these improvements in a shorter time period than with the Modified Ultimate interchange. Since year 2015 traffic volumes could be rrl tigated with intersection improvements and signalization for any of the three interchange alternatives, the conclusions of the Downtown Circulation Study would remain valid. It should, however, be pointed out that this analysis has been performed only for the Year 2015, and the General Plan Buildout scenario has not been specifically evaluated. CONCLUSIONS As discussed above, retention of the existing eastbound off and westbound on -ramps would provide significant circulation benefits to the historic downtown area by maintaining a convenient Interstate 80 portal to the Old Mill Site and Glenshire and Olympic Heights subdivisions. Absent these ramps, the preferred east -west travel route across the historic downtown area is along Commercial Row instead of the Interstate 80 corridor_ This has the effect of diverting east -west regional traffic flow off the Interstate 80 corridor and through the historic downtown area including the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection, This diversion of traffic effectively means that the Bridge Street/Commercial Row intersection will reach its practical operating capacity and create congestion along Commercial Row until delay increases to a point where it is more travel time effective to use Interstate 80 and the proposed State Route 267 Bypass Ultimate Interchange Design to cross downtown. From a design standpoint, it would be possible to develop a safe, functional design that would allow these existing ramps to remain open. This could be designed in a safe and functional manner, although it would be non-standard from a Caltrans and an FHWA standpoint die to partial interchange and interchange spacing guidelines. As discussed above, the substantial impacts associated with eliminating the existing eastbound off and westbound on ramps on historic downtown Truckee can be avoided without creating substantial safety or operational issues on the State Highway and Interstate network. If we can be of additional assistance regarding this matter, please fuel free to call us at 583-4053. 11 11 z w wO vi 4 a-wY, S � 3 C7 W Z 0 t-, � � w � 0. p z �` o cf J Ir mza aM € d L3� CC z o Ln 1 L I I t., �r n -- 'JC saDQSflOd Ad LQ LAJ d'. N F► ALO d ! a r ZL c1 r� � a r• E i 1 I 4 � r t i r r' - rn l z z w wO vi 4 a-wY, S � 3 C7 W Z 0 t-, � � w � 0. p z �` o cf J Ir mza aM € d L3� CC z o Ln 1 L I I t., �r n -- 'JC saDQSflOd Ad LQ LAJ d'. N F► ALO d ! a r ZL c1 r� � a r• 1 } IN ea a144 m �l � F Lj 0 LLJ H Leal L W 0 Lu d Q cr_ <ui Z Qo u ' o W a -10� ¢ W Q vll < ¢ CL dU ? 4 N 11 li t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 v l� r 1 1 1 1 t t i ATTACHMENT C TOWN OF TRUCKEE California RESOLUTION NO. 97-37 A RESOLUTION OF THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF TRUCKEE CERTIFYING THE FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT FOR THE DOWNTOWN TRUCKEE SPECIFIC PLAN WHEREAS, the Town Council has received and reviewed the Final Environmental Impact Report for the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan, attached as Exhibit B to the staff report containing this Resolution; and WHEREAS, the availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Report was duly noticed in the Sierra Sun to all affected property owners and through the State Clearinghouse as required; and WHEREAS, the Final Environmental Impact Report consists of the Draft Environmental Impact Report, the comments received on the Draft Environmental Impact Report during the 45 day public review period and through the State Clearinghouse, and the responses to each comment received; and WHEREAS, the Final Environmental Impact Report was prepared for the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act and said Environmental Impact Report complies with the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act and all applicable State and Municipal Guidelines; and WHEREAS, the Final Environmental Impact Report indicates significant environmental effects would result from approval of the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan; and WHEREAS, the California Environmental Quality Act and State and Town Guidelines adopted pursuant thereto require the Truckee Town Council to make certain findings where the Environmental Impact Report identifies one or more significant effects which would or would likely result from approval of the Downtown Specific Plan; and WHEREAS, the substantial evidence and statements of fact relied upon by the Town Council to support the above findings are located in the record of these proceedings, including but not limited to the Statement of Facts and Findings set forth in Exhibit 1 to this Resolution; and WHEREAS, the mitigation measures to prevent identified significant impacts, and the mitigation monitoring program required by Public Resources Code Section 21081.6 are set forth in Exhibit 2, Mitigation Measures and Mitigation Monitoring Program; and. WHEREAS, all significant effects on the environment have been eliminated or substantially lessened where feasible, and for every significant effect found to be unavoidable there are overriding considerations for Downtown Specific Plan approval which are set forth in Exhibit 3, Statement of Overriding Considerations; and WHEREAS, the Town Council has reviewed and accepted the recommendation of the Town of Truckee Planning Commission to certify the Final Environmental Impact Report for the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan; and WHEREAS, the Town Council has considered the information in the Final EIR prior to approving the Downtown Truckee Specific Pian.. NOW THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE TOWN COUNCIL OF THE TOWN OF TRUCKEE as follows: 1. The Final Environmental Impact Report for the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan is hereby certified based on the findings contained herein. PASSED AND ADOPTED by the Town of Truckee Town Council on this day of , 1997 by the following vote: AYES: NOES: ABSENT; it i] f] 1 1 Robert W. Drake, Mayor i ATTEST: Stephen L. Wright, Town Clerk , ,ATTACHMENTS: Exhibit C-1 Statement of Facts and Findings Exhibit C-2 Mitigation Measures and Mitigation Monitoring Program Exhibit C-3 Statement of Overriding Considerations EXHIBIT C-1 STATEMENT OF FACTS AND FINDINGS SIGNIFICANT ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF THE PROPOSED PROJECT, FINDINGS WITH RESPECT TO SAID EFFECTS, AND STATEMENT OF FACTS IN SUPPORT. THEREOF, ALL WITH RESPECT TO THE DOWNTOWN TRUCKEE SPECIFIC PLAN, L BACKGROUND The Downtown Truckee Specific Plan Environmental Impact Report (EIR) analyzes the potential impacts associated with the adoption of the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan. 1. CEQA Requirements State CEQA Guidelines promulgated pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) provide in part: No public agency shall approve or carry out a project for which an EIR has been completed which identifies one or more significant effects of the project unless the public agency makes one or more written findings for each of those significant effects, accompanied by a brief explanation of the rationale for each finding. (Section 21081 of the California Environmental Quality Act and Section 15491 of the CEQA Guidelines). The Final EIR identifies certain significant environmental effects, which may occur as a result of the project. Therefore, findings are set forth herein in Exhibit 1 pursuant to Section 15491 of the CEQA. Guidelines. As certain significant impacts cannot be reduced to a less than significant level, a Statement of Overriding Considerations is provided in Exhibit 3. Mitigation Measures referenced herein and a Mitigation Monitoring program are contained in Exhibit 2. As required in Public Resources Code Section 21081.6, the Town, in adopting these findings, also adopts a monitoring and reporting program designed to ensure that, during implementation of the Dowmown Truckee Specific Plan, the Town, private developers, and other responsible parties implement the adopted mitigation measures. t2. Required Findings The Town has made one of the following findings for each potentially significant impact and provides facts in support of each finding, in accordance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15491: a. Changes or alterations have been required in or incorporated into the Specific Plan, which mitigate or substantially lessen the significant environmental effects thereof. Town of Truckee Resolution 97-37 Page 3 i b. Even with mitigation, the magnitude of certain impacts will not be reduced to a less than significant level. Specific economic, social, or other considerations make mitigation of certain impacts to a less than significant level infeasible. 3. The Record For the purposes of CEQA and the findings hereinafter set forth, the Record for the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan consists of the following. a. All relevant staff reports, minutes, technical reports, and other pLmning documents related to the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan which are available to the public in accordance with the California Public Records Act; b. All CEQA documents prepared for the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan, and ail documents on which the CEQA documents rely by reference, and Response to Comments, all which collectively represent part of the Final EIR. c. All written comments concerning the CEQA documents received by the Town from public agencies and interested members of the public during the public comment and review period on the Draft EIR, and during the public comment and review period on the Final EIR.- d. These Findings and Statement of Overriding Considerations adopted in connection with the Downtown Truckee Specific Plaza; and e. Testimonyreceived b the Planning Commission and th y g e City Council at noticed public hearings held on the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan. i All other publicly released information and publicly available documents or testimony submitted to the City supporting or augmenting the environmental documents prepared pursuant to CEQA. 4. Discretionary Action The Discretionary actions for the proposed project involve adoption of the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan, Volumes Z & 3. Town of Truckee Resolution 97-37 Page 4 1 1 II. SIGNIFICANT EFFECTS, FINDINGS, AND STATEMENTS OF FACT For the following impacts #1 through 410, the finding is made that changes or alterations have been required in or incorporated into the Specific Plan which mitigate or substantially lessen the significant environmental effects thereof. I. Significant Effect: Development accommodated by the Downtown Specific Plan will result in an increase in the population within the DSA. The Downtown Specific Plan implements the goals and policies of the Town of Truckee General Plan, which was formulated to accommodate projected growth in all land use categories to the year 2015, Projected growth for the year 2015 was based on detailed demographic and economic studies for Truckee, contained in Volume III of the General Plan, and reflects a best estimate as to future growth trends. Population growth will result in potentially significant impacts in areas identified and discussed in items 2 through 10 herein. Statement of Fact: Additional population growth does not constitute a significant impact of its own accord, however it is directly linked to the significant effects identified in 92 -- 10 below. 2. Significant Effect: The Downtown.. Specific Plan could result in land use compatibility conflicts. Land use incompatibility occurs when the activities related to one land use negatively impact a different nearby land use. Such incompatibility may result from noise, odors, public access, traffic patterns, and lighting. Land Uses that create potential incompatibilities are commercial, industrial, schools, public facilities, recreational uses, timber harvesting, ruining, etc., in close proximity to sensitive uses such as residential areas and wildlife habitat. Statement of Fact: Potential conflicts for most of these uses have been addressed in the DSA zoning standards (Specific Plan Volume 3) through the establishment of conditional use permit, which is intended to address compatibility issues with adjacent development. Specific .Plan policies which mitigate this impact to a less than significant level are 2.13.3 &16, 2.E.2 &5. 3. Significant Impact: Additional development could result in an increase in soil erosion and land instability. Statement of Fact: The following specific plait policies will mitigate soils impacts to a less than significant level: 7.C. 1&2, 71.1. 4. Significant Impact: Additional development accommodated by the Specific Plan will result in an increase in traffic noise, and an increase in stationary -source noise generators and Town of Truckee Resolution 97-37 Page 3 ambient noise. Statement of Fact: The following Specific Plan policies mitigate impacts from an increase in noise levels to less than significant levels: 7.D.1-4 5. Significant Impact:, Sensitive Biological Resources could be disturbed or eliminated as a result of new development accommodated by the Specific Plan. In surnmasy, impacts to wildlife and plant species could occur in the following areas: loss of habitat and forage lands, habitat degradation due to encroaching urbanization, direct mortality and/or injury of sensitive species, habitat fragmentation and obstruction of movement corridors, and harassment of wildlife by humans, pets, and livestock. Statement of Fact: The following Specific Plan policies mitigate potentially significant biological impacts to less than significant levels: 2.B.3, 2.0.1, 7,9,10, 7.B 1-7. 5. Significant 1m act: Scenic Resources could be degraded by new development accommodated by the Specific Plan. Statement of Fact: The fallowing Specific Plan policies mitigate potentially significant scenic resource impacts to a less than significant level: General Plan Policies identified in Section 7.G. 7. Significant Impact: New development could result in an increase in surface and ground water pollution, including the following: increase in pollutant laden urban storm water runoff, increase in the potential for erosion and sedimentation of waterways, increase in the potential for toxic spills. 8. 9. Statement of Fact: The following Specific Plan policies mitigate potentially significant impacts to water quality to less than significant levels: 7.C. 1&2. Significant Impact: Cultural and Historic Resources could be destroyed or degraded by new development accommodated by the Specific Plan. Statement of Fact: The following Specific Plan policies address impacts to cultural resources: Chapter 8: all policies in all sections. Si nificant Impact-, Growth accommodated by the Specific Plan will result in increased demand for public services in the areas of schools, sewer service, water service, fire and police protection, parks, and energy supplies, and solid waste production. Statement of Fact: The following Specific Plan policies mitigate impacts to public services Town of Truckee Resolution 97.37 Page 4 [7 t t t r i] t t 1 [1 t w than significant level: All policies in sections 6B 6D 6E. 6 F and 5 G. to a less h grufican p , , 10. Significant Impact: New Development accommodated by the General Plan could expose people to natural hazards such as avalanches, wildfire, flooding, and erosion - Statement of rasion_Statement.of Fact: The following Specific Plan policies mitigate potential impacts from natural hazards to a less than significant level: All policies in Section 6.E, Policies 6G 1-4. Policy 7F.2. For the fallowing impacts #11 and 012, the finding is made that even with mitigation proposed in the Final EIR, the magnitude of the impacts will not be reduced to a less than significant level. Specific economic, social, or other considerations make mitigation of these impacts to a less than significant level infeasible. 11. Significant Impact: Growth accommodated by the Downtown Specific Plan will create - additional traffic, resulting in and increase in Level of Service deficiencies. A detailed analysis of the Traffic Impacts of the Downtown Specific Plan is contained in Volume 4 of the Specific Plan (Draft EIR). Statement of Fact: The impacts of the Specific Plan on traffic will be partially mitigated by the following policies: Because of the existing LDS deficiencies during peak hours at the main intersections in Town, specified in Volume 4, pages 4-2 and 4-3, this impact cannot be fully mitigated to a less than significant level. Regional traffic, which is not related to growth in Truckee, such as traffic traveling to ski resorts and Lake Tahoe, passes through Downtown Truckee. The Town is unable to significantly reduce these regional through trips prior to construction of the Highway 267 Bypass. In addition, intersection improvements and roadway widening which would improve Level of Service above F at the subject intersections in the short terra are either infeasible due to project costs which would exceed the Town's available funds for roadway improvements, or would have unacceptable effects on community character in the Downtown. area. The project alternatives evaluated do not reduce the subject impacts to a less than significant level. Specific considerations; as discussed in Section III of this Exhibit, make infeasible the project alternatives. Benefits of the project (overriding considerations), as described in Exhibit C of this resolution, outweigh any remaining unmitigated environmental impacts. 1.2. Significant Impact: New development will result in an increase in air pollutants, including the following: generation of air pollution from vehicular traffic; generation of particulate matter from wood burning stoves, fires, road sanding, travel on unpaved roads, construction activities, and generation of odors from industrial uses. Statement of Fact: Because particulate based air pollution is a regional issue which extends Town of Truckee Resolution 97-37 Page 5 beyond the boundaries of the DSA, the Downtown Specific Plan EIR identifies the following General Plan policies which address impacts to air quality: All policies under Conservation and Open Space Goal. 11. Impacts from pollutants of CO and Nox are less than significant, as is supported by evidence in the Truckee General Plan, Volume II, part 3, pages 19-21. Even with mitigation contained in the Truckee General Plan, it cannot be clearly demonstrated at this point in time that the magnitude of the air quality impacts from particulate matter (P1vI10) will be reduced to a less than significant level. Existing levels of PIM 10 have exceeded State and Federal standards in Truckee. Even with mitigation in the Truckee General Plan which requires 100% mitigation of PM10 impacts created by new discretionary projects, reduction of existing PM10 levels will be required to reduce the impact to a less than significant Ievel. General Plan policies require preparation of a Truckee Air Quality Management Plan to address reductions in existing PM10 levels, however until the Pian is completed and adopted it is not possible to conclusively demonstrate that existing PM10 levels will be reduced to a less than significant level. Specific economic, social, or ether considerations make immediate mitigation of this impact to a less than significant level infeasible. Reducing existing levels of PM10 will require a combination of approaches including removal of old woodstoves in existing residences, limitations on open burning, and improved street sweeping procedures. These measures will be researched and fully evaluated during preparation of the Town's Air Quality Management Plan. The Air Quality Plan must undergo full public review and ultimate Town Council adoption before ordinances can be put into place to implement reductions in existing PMl0 levels. Delaying the Downtown Specific Plan adoption until adoption and implementation of the Air Quality Management Plan is not feasible or practical in light of the pressing need for a comprehensive plan for the Downtown Study Area, and in light of the significant benefits of adopting the Downtown Specific Plan as outlined in Exhibit C. The project alternatives did not reduce the impacts to a less than significant level. Specific considerations, as discussed in Section III of this Exhibit, make infeasible the project alternatives which would reduce the impact. Benefits of the project (overriding considerations), as described in Exhibit 3 of this Resolution, outweigh any reining unmitigated environmental impacts. III. ALTERNATIVES The Final EIR, in compliance with CEQA Guidelines Section 15126, analyzed the following alternatives in addition to the proposed Downtown, Truckee Specific Plan. 1. No Proiect: The "No Project" alternative would maintain the existing zoning within the DSA. This alternative would maintain zoning which is inconsistent with the Town of Truckee General Plan, adopted in February 1996..Adoption of the Downtown Specific Plan is intended to Town of Truckee Resolution 97-37 Page 6 ri t t t t 11' L LI t t LI address long standing problems with land uses and environmental problems in the DSA, therefore the no project alternative would preclude implementation of important Specific Plan policies which re intended to mitigate long standing environmental problems. The amount of industrial development accommodated in the DSA would be substantially higher under this alternative, since existing industrially zoned areas would remain unchanged. The amount of infill residential and commercial uses would be reduced under this alternative, due to the maintenance of large areas of industrial zoning. Significant and unmitigable environmental impacts would remain with this alternative, and all other environmental impacts identified in this EIR would be unmitigated due to the lack of environmental protection policies put in place by.the proposed Downtown Specific Plan. Impacts on trafffic circulation and air quality (PMIO) would remain significant and unmitigable under this alternative. Adoption of this alternative is not feasible or practical due to the fact that the Downtown Study Area zoning would be inconsistent with the Town of Truckee General Plan, and specific goals and policies contained in the Town General Plan relating to the Downtown Study Area would not be implemented. 2. Reduced Growth: The "Reduced Growth" alternative would reduce the development potential of the DSA by 2. This alternative would result in a smaller amount of projected growth being accommodated in the DSA, primarily in the Mill Site and Hilltop master plan areas. Under this alternative the Specific Plan policies to address long standing environmental and land use problems would be adopted, but the Town of Truckee General Plan direction to accommodate infill growth would not be implemented to the fullest extent possible. Potential environmental impacts under this alternative may be reduced slightly, however the significant and unmitigable impacts would remain. Adoption of this alternative is not feasible or practical due to the fact that specific goals and policies contained in the Town General Plan relating to directing infill growth into the Downtown Study Area would not be implemented. Town of Truckee Resolution 97-37 Page 7 . w Lay ca a a i tee„ y u `ac m vo na w� tia �a = _ ri O}L` •F 0 I ��tiyy[CV �'0y� {d�6 VA - I I II4 tiB Y� R Wj '� � Zlo TiG 5 :9 rfj i J C] G C) W D n_ y rZ w o a m m �.^• � � 1 9 � 'el O C V D a i ^� r,7 V w i C! m � G W� V r .uV J.V. 75. 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G N 1-4 t6 C6 -•d t t 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 Chapter 5 Alternatives Analysis The following discussion constitutes the roadway alternatives analysis portion of the downtown circulation study. The operational traffic characteristics of the various roadway network alternatives that have been considered in this study are presented. In developing the alternatives analysis, the following study guidelines were followed: As much as possible while providing for adequate circulation and traffic safety, downtown streets should preserve the historic and scenic qualities of the area. M. In general terms, taus goal can best be attained by dispersing traffic, rather than concentrating traffic. ■ To the maximum degree possible, through traffic on the downtown roadways should be eliminated. . The year 2015 was chosen as a 20 -year transportation network planning horizon. This is typical for community transportation studies. Four -lane roadways should be avoided. I. Double left turn lanes should be avoided. To the extent possible, traffic circles should be used as an alternative to signalization. Signalization of intersections is assumed to be driven by capacity deficiencies. ■ All intersections in the downtown area need to operate at LOS F or better, as per the town Level Of Service policy. Following is a description of each of the roadway alternatives that has been considered. No BUILD After the traffic generation and distribution analysis was completed, the next step in evaluating the Truckee roadway network was to determine future year roadway operational characteristics. The first step in this process is to evaluate future year traffic conditions assuming a no build scenario (no new roadways). To perform this analysis, projected year 2015 and general plan intersection Level Of Service were evaluated for thirteen downtown study area intersections. The results of this analysis are presented in Figure 12.. In general, this analysis indicates that, if no new roadways are constructed in Truckee, State Route 267 from interstate 80 to Martis Valley would need to be widened to four lanes and signalized, or allowed to operate in a state of gridlock during peak demand hours. ALTERNATIVE I - PROGRAMMED ROADWAY IMPROVEMENTS The next step in evaluating the future Truckee transportation network was to perforin an intersection analysis at the thirteen downtown study area intersections assuming existing. planned, but not yet constructed, roadways to be in place for the future analysis years. The three major roadway improvements that are currently in the planning and design phases in Truckee are: Truckee Downtown Circulation S LSC. lnc. Page 31 % k \ � \ z TmakelDowntown Cir culcaion5nAdv LSC. Inc. Page 32 � c ■ •� � & $ .� � � � � » .� � } . . . � � ƒ � E J « } E .@ f / A ° § c �U _ �§ VI } . � o fktnL } Cl §[ \ � — G 3 _ § C14§ �2 a 0 o &C } & Q 3 < < / \ \ \ \ 2 11 i : � O w � % k \ � \ z TmakelDowntown Cir culcaion5nAdv LSC. Inc. Page 32 � ■ •� .� � � � » .� � � . . � � % k \ � \ z TmakelDowntown Cir culcaion5nAdv LSC. Inc. Page 32 EXHIBIT C-2 MITIGATION MEASURES AND MITIGATION MONITORING PROGRAM ' The following matrix table identifies all policies of the Downtown Specific Plan which implement the mitigation measures listed in Table 1.1 of Volume 4 of the Downtown Specific Plan (Draft EIR), and the additional mitigation measures added in response to public comments on the Draft EIR. These mitigation measures have been adopted by the Town Council in order to mitigate or avoid. to the best feasible extent possible, significant effects on the environment which may result from future actions 1 1 1 1.1 1 emanating from the Downtown Specific Plan. Section .2108 1.6 of the California Environmental Quality Act requires the Town Council to adopt a reporting or monitoring program for all adopted mitigation measures to ensure compliance with those mitigation measures during project implementation. Because the Downtown Specific Plan is a planning document, the mitigation measures are directly incorporated into the Specific Plan as policies. The matrix table is structured to provide information on each policy and mitigation measure to meet the requirements of a monitoring or reporting program. The following information is provided: 1. Program 1 Policy: A Specific Plan policy which has been identified in Table I of the Final Environmental Impact Report to implement a mitigation measure. 2. Summary of Policy: A description of the policies which serve as mitigation measure(s) contained in the Downtown Specific Plan 3. Implemented by: The manner in which the Specific Pian policy will be implemented by future actions of the Town. 4. Responsible Dept: The Town Department responsible for administering and implementing the Specific Plan policy. 5. Decision -Maker: The authority body which will Hulce the ultimate decision on implementing the Specific Plan policy. 6. Implementation Timing: An estimate of the timeframe in which the Specific Plan policy will be implemented. 7. Potential Funding Source: A list of the possible funding sources for implementation of the subject policy. ..The Town Council or its designated decision-making bodies must determine that every discretionary action considered within the DSA, including public projects, is consistent with the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan before such an action may be approved. This determination for Downtown Specific Plan consistency will ensure that each project is consistent with the policies of the Downtown Truckee Specific Plan and the identified mitigation measures are properly implemented. Town of Truckee Resolution 97-37 Page 8 :. 'oA 3 ^! c•] C'Y '�?< ir7 10 tom! OD ^� St hl N N Cti N N (V N N ..... k N 7 Id fl °� au nn vu ron m UD m fi cu ^ to r U v m m m w ra V d M r im Yi0 m '.pprs `" DG :W :. 'oA 3 ^! c•] C'Y '�?< ir7 10 tom! OD ^� St hl N N Cti N N (V N N I. goWM f43.sr 3+n -415S t iJ 1 1 t t 1 L L.n&W o=cz s 0-F F-Azm Y. M- I VAULT a MON rV031MZY ST, r � rim 7OB-6768 r�urus� zi, ,ccs; BY FXX: 9 l 6 _gR; -7710 : C TO 7OLLOW 2Y MAIC Tony lash -.rock, Director Depaz-tme at of Co=unity Development: Town of Tzruckee 11570 Donner Pass Roar: Truckee, CA 96161 Dear Mr_ Lashbrack: ;"Qwn cE Tzuckee p town Saec 17 plan Draft Tnvi onmen-ta- 2mpact Report This latter contains the comments of Union. Pacific Railroad ("UP") an. the Draft c vironmental 1=7cac t Recon ("Draf t £IR") for the May, 1997 draft w of the Dont: w7n Trucked Specific Plan ("the Pian"). UP will be providing comments on the Plan itself in a separate transmittal. As a major stakeholder -Jr., the Town., UP appreciates this opportunity to participate in development of t o Town's General Plan and to contribute to the success at the Dcwrt.,own Speci-fic. Plan. UP is concerned that two of the proposals in the Plan will impact railroad operations, and that thesa ' impacts have not been adequately addressed in the Draft EIR. The first of these proposals concerns the develcpment of the :sill Site. The Plan proposes the development: of Sa0 mu'ti-family residential, units and 250 lodging units at the Mill Site. Sae Plan, Val+,=e 2, Chanter 2, Pages ?3, 18 (Table 2-1). No precise location is indicated for this development, but'the Mill Site includes promerty both within and adjacent to t :e Hail ovn Track. 1n addition, within the area of the Balloon Track, plan proposes a public park with an Outdoor ice skating rink servir.q as a pond in the su:umer. See Plan, Voi�ne 2, Cha tar 2, Page 11. Thls .concept is further developed in C::a-pter 9, wh oh shows t :a area within the Balloon Track crntaining five t1liree-story off -ice, civic, and artist loft buildings, three road crossings,. and a central pond. See Plan, Volume 2, C!iapter 9, Pages 6, 11 (Figure 9.4) . c d6C P.0:3 LAW 0 -_1CTS of PAUL M. Tony Lashbrook August Z1, 1997 Page 2 Development within the Ballcon Track, as well as residential and lodging develccment in the area of the Balloon Track, Lncludnq at -grade vehicle and pedestLian crossings, may present unacceptable conflicts with railroad operations on the Balloon Tack. As stated in our letter of ,Tune 17, 1996, UP . may have locomotives and other railroad equipment operating or idling 2 continuously on the Sallcon Track for as much as a week at a time, pa-ticuyarl.y in ner icds of had weat. er when rail road snow clearing equipment must be kept in a state of constant readiness. While the Plan would commit the Town to achieving this type and level of development, no discussion is included in the 7-2R of the impacts of this development on railroad operations cn t^e Balloon Track or on the public safety ccncew ns raised by the three at -- grade crossings, and anly the most general discussion is included in the EZR concerning the potenti-al land use that may result from tte Mix of ra4lroad, residential, and recreational' uses on the x411 Site. y The Plan also proposes an at --grade pedestrian crwssing of LTP's main line tracks at Spring Street. This crossing W©uld connect the Cowntown C mmercial Row with commercial development along West River Street. jp=e Pian, Volume 2, Chapter 2, Page 7;. Chapter 4, Page 2-3 (F4qura 4.1). AL -grade crossingsare widely acknowledged in the railr.,�ad industry as a safety concern, and the indust --y has a nationwide pr❑gram of elimi.nati.ng them whenever possible. This crossing wi11 be used by tourists unfamiliar with the pattern of Iccal train operations, and some of them will have unsupervised small children. In winter, piles of snow from t -rack and walkway snow clearing may block the sight and muffle the sound of Approaching trains. Even with modern safety devices, an at -grade crossing such as ttis has the potentia= for accidents resulting in serious inj'uries or death. Given the number and frequency of trains running through the - Dcwnt^wn, the intensity of cammerci.al development manned for the area, and the existence of the present Bridge Street grade crossing a block away, the EIR should e.tamine the necessity for an additional grade crossing, the impacts of a pedestrian grade crossing on public safety, and tate possible means of mAtigating these impacts. The ETR should also examine alternatives such as an overhead or undergo. ound pedestr. iar. crossing- rossing.UP UPacknowledges 'Llat its assistance will be recuired in order for the Tcwr, to properly consider nese questions, and UP would be pleased to work with the Town's planning staff. and ....1 consultants in this regard.